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In the Hebrew square script, the first line of the stele says אנכ.משע.בנ.כמש[מלכ].מלכ.מאב.הד The letters "מלכ" (m-l-k) are indeed repeated twice, but none of these two copies is a part of the true name of the father which is just "Chemosh". The line really says "I am Mesha son of King Chemosh, the king of Moab the Dibonite". The word "King" is probably ...


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Depending of how you state the events, a candidate could the War of Spanish Succession. Philip V of Spain was recognized by the Crown of Aragon as King, but he was deeply distrusted (in part of being French, in part because the Borbon dinasty had imposed centralism in France) and later the Crown of Aragon came to support Charles II. Of course, depending of ...


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The Bishops war between the Covenanters and the Episcopals, in 17th century Scotland. I stand to be corrected, but I don't think the Covenanters had a candidate to replace Charles. So we can say that they accepted he was head of state. The English were against the Covenanters (although it was more complicated than that). England and Scotland had separate ...


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The best and closest examples are likely to be civil wars in realms that consisted of two or more kingdoms in personal union. Thus it may be a matter of interpretation how well they satisfy your question. During the 30 years war Emperor Ferdinand II was king of (part of) Hungary,etc., and Bohemia, Archduke of Austria, etc. At one point Hungarian Rebel ...


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There was a referendum to restore the Albanian monarchy in 1997, following a period of severe unrest. The official results of the referendum had the motion failing by a 2-1 margin; the monarchists then claimed that the result was invalid, riots broke out, and the crown prince Leka fled the country and was tried in absentia for inciting rebellion. The ...


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Are you restricting your question to a certain time period? If not, then there are a number of examples, besides those already given in the other answers, which could qualify: France has vacillated between a republic and a monarchy several times; the First Republic was succeeded by the First Empire under Napoleon, after which the Bourbon kingdom was ...


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He did not say it. The bon mot was well known in France and was originated by Voltaire in Chapter 24 of his book Siecle de Louis XIV which was published in 1751. According to Voltaire's account Louis XIV said this in a speech before the parliament on April 13, 1865, which would have been 85 years previously to when Voltaire wrote it. In the actual speech ...



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