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13

Let's split this into two questions. First, is it plausible that a population of Russian emigrants from the White émigré population would sing this Soviet song. And second, was it the intention of the film makers to portray the Russian emigrants as influenced by Soviet culture. According to Wikipedia, Russian Americans came to America in four waves: the ...


8

Vuvuzela and the Melodica spring to mind. Plastic aerophones like the Vuvuzela have been around since the 1960's, obviously similar looking brass instruments have been around for a long time, but specifically Vuvuzelas meet your criteria. They're a bit of a gimmic, but were very popular at the 2010 World Cup and have seen widespread use. More Melodica's ...


7

The earliest copy of this melody is from 1893, with the song "Good morning to all" by Patty Hill and Mildred J. Hill. It was published in a songbook titled Song Stories for the Kindergarten. The lyrics to "Happy Birthday to you" appears in the early 20th century. The first reliable source for these lyrics being used with the "Good morning" melody is from ...


7

From what I have been able to research, numerous sources such as this and this trace back rap to the griots of pre-colonial, western Africa. Griots were essentially poets and bards who communicated history and political messages through song. According to the article "Politics of Diaspora: Sahwari poets and postcolonial transformations of a trans-Saharan ...


6

My answer is that this is just a dramatization with little to no research done by the producing team. The tradition of playing the winning team's national anthem was not begun until the 1932 Olympics (a common misconception is that the tradition started at the 1924 Olympics). So, in other words, it is impossible that the Star Spangled Banner was played at ...


5

It means "Dawn", quite simply, with an elided "of the" to keep the rhythm.


3

Four String Acoustic Bass Guitar (I used to play one, so I know it's new). See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acoustic_bass_guitar "The first modern acoustic bass guitar was developed in the mid-1950s by Kay of Chicago[citation needed] but the design did not show up again in a production instrument until the early 1960s when Ernie Ball of San Luis Obispo, ...


3

I guess the Sousaphone just barely doesn't make it. It was first created in either 1893 or 1898, depending on who you believe. The Mellophone, a common marching band instrument, was first sold in 1957.


3

Wearers of the Zoot suit were not really "hip" (in the usual sense of the word). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zoot_suit They were mainly Latinos and African-Americans, who wore them as a protest against oppression, rather than as a cultural statement, although some elements of jazz, slang, and "lifestyle" issues accompanied them. With the onset of World ...


3

This is not political, this is nostalgic. I am an immigrant from Russia, and I've seen many, many times older immigrants singing or playing Soviet era songs, including Katyusha. One can hate the regime one and still love the country. Many songs, especially with mild or none political content, are being loved for the music and the music of the language many ...


2

Here's a link to 36 USC Section 301, regarding the national anthem: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/36/301 There are a number of references in the code about the "military salute." It seems like the Star Spangled Banner was chosen for its "martialness." The Olympics probably weren't a factor. The song was adopted by an act of Congress in 1931, a ...


2

Mozart played mainly at the court of Queen Maria Theresa of Austria. But she had a daughter, Marie Antoinette, who was Queen of France (and who hosted Mozart on a tour). http://www.enchantedlearning.com/music/bios/mozart/ It's unlikely that Mozart was "never" popular in France before World War II. What MAY have been true is that Mozart, who had his ups and ...


1

There are enough mentionings of Mozart e.g. in the Wikipedia article on Frédéric Chopin (1810–1849), another child prodigy, classical music composer, and pianist who died young, to convince me that Mozart was studied and taken seriously for one by the French musical elite in the (early) 19th century, i.e. well before WW II. Seven-year-old "little Chopin" ...


1

There is a difference in Wikipedia between "hip" and "hipster" but I suspect that would be cleared up with an edit. "Hip" means "in the know" as in part of a sub-culture. The definition of "hipster" as used in the 40's as a jazz aficionado and etceteras (as someone above has posted) would have been the use within the jazz community and there were certainly ...



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