Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

28

According to this page which cites "Steckel, Richard H. and Roderick Floud (eds.)Health and Welfare during Industrialization Chicago : University of Chicago, 1997" as a source, the average height of a Frenchman between 1800 and 1820 was 164.1 cm. According to the French historian, Marcel Dunan (1963): "If one refers to the Memoirs of Marchand, t. II, ...


11

In 1799, Napoleon went from Egypt where his bases were, through modern Israel to Acre (Acco) 1799. In Acre he attempted a siege, lost it, and returned to Egypt. Acre was the Northernmost point he reached in Israel. Napoleon was not in Israel before of after 1799. Other places he passed through in Israel were: Gaza, Jaffa, Haifa, Mount Tabor, River Jordan. ...


10

Considering he escaped from an island prison and re-rallied the country, putting him in the Bastille (in the middle of France) and then leaving and demobilzing your army would quite obviously have been a Bad Idea. As for not executing him...I don't think they could really do that either. His only real "crime" was leading armies against them and losing. If ...


8

According to this source, Napoleon was particularly indebted to Sun Tzu for the combination of "Chang" and Ch'i. http://www.lesc.net/blog/napoleon-and-sun-tzu-gary-gagliardi-science-strategy-institute That is, the combination of a direct attack, which could be repulsed with difficulty, followed by a "smaller," but more lethal surprise attack that would ...


7

France was in 1792 attacked by a coalition of states, that included several Italian states. Although the Papal States and Republic of Venice was not amongst them, Naples and Sicily was. This put the Papal States as well as Venice in the middle of the war between Austria and France, since Venice was located between France and Austria and the Papal States ...


6

As far as I know, David's correct - the wargame as we know it today was invented shortly after Napoleon's time by a Prussian man named Reiswitz. Without knowing your source on this, I see three possibilities for Napoleon's wargames: 1) It was something like chess (variations were popular at the time), which could provide the psychological insight you ...


5

Napoleon WAS imprisoned. The first time, at Elba, was under "house arrest." Security was lax, and he escaped and started the "100 Days." The British didn't make the same mistake the second time. The venue chosen for his exile was St. Helena Island in the South Atlantic, one of the most isolated places in the world. It is more than 1000 miles from Angola to ...


4

Modern Israel, Egypt, Palestine and Syria were all part of the Ottoman Empire during the time of Napoleon. Under him, the French led an expedition from Malta to Egypt, which later travelled through modern Israel, capturing several port cities on the way. The answer is then yes, Napoleon tried and succeeded in taking a couple of cities in what is modern ...


4

Bonaparte's biographer Vincent Cronin's mentions the British naval blockade but no further preventive countermeasures (that I could find upon brief reconsultation). Perhaps this is because this is a one-volume biography of a (in some ways :) big subject. As to Sidney Smith's role (he is also mentioned in the Wikipedia article), his biographer Tom Pocock ...


4

Following-up on @FelixGoldberg's answer I found this in Sources and Notes of Vincent Cronin's Napoleon: The remark attributed to N[apoleon], "I know men, and I tell you that Jesus Christ was not a man" is apocryphal. [Robert-Antoine de] Beauterne, who coined it never met N[apoleon]. This is good enough evidence for me; it suggests the following: ...


4

You will have a difficult time convincing me that Napoleon was the best battlefield technician of all time, when he was only the third best French practitioner of that art during the Napoleonic Era; Davout and likely Desaix would head that list. Similarly as a dynastic founder Napoleon's complete ineptitude at diplomacy place him a long ways down that list. ...


4

They are termed camp followers and have followed armies since before Ramses II at Kadesh. Modern armies travel with long tails of official logistical services - cooks, tailors, smiths, armourers, teamsters, nurses, physicians & surgeons, etc. - that in earlier times were provided by civilian camp followers, but wives, children, mistresses and others ...


3

That painting is of Napoleon Bonaparte. He is portrayed with a hand-in-waistcoat gesture, common to the portraits of men from the 18th and 19th centuries. That is pretty much the only reason that can be validified. There are many other theories for why Napoleon often hid his hand (including stomach pain, irritated skin, and more), but the only reason that ...


2

According to Napoleon: His Army and His Generals: Their Unexamples Military Career (Jean Charles Dominique de Lacretelle, Page 382), Napoleon played vingtun "21" (aka Blackjack) and chess when he was being taken into exhile. As a somewhat complex strategy game, it would be a telling example of a general's behavior, though I don't have proof that he played it ...


2

A very interesting question. Not much I can say at the moment, but according to this apparently serious website which gives an annotated list of Napoleonic memoirs, Bertrand did write a book. Bertrand, General Henri-Gratien, comte (1773-1844): Haythornthwaite calls him the most loyal of Napoleon's followers. He served in many of the campaigns, and ...


2

Both. First off, address the bias. There is a substantial fraction of historians who think that Napoleon's armpits smelled like air freshener and posies sprung up in his footsteps. They believe that the word "wrong" is defined as "disagrees with Napoleon", and discussing Napoleon's failings is not just an intellectual but also a moral hazard. I'm not fond ...


1

Religion: Based on Carlyle's accounts, the French foray into an organized from of Deism was essentially stillborn. In Chapter 3.6.IV he writes: But on the day they call Decadi, New-Sabbath, 20 Prairial, 8th June (1794) by old style....his day, if it please Heaven, we are to have, on improved Anti-Chaumette principles: a New Religion. Catholicism ...


1

Stone walls do not a prison make, Nor iron bars a cage; Minds innocent and quiet take That for an hermitage; To Althea, from Prison Napoleon was imprisoned. He could not travel beyond the confines of the island, nor could anyone visit him. "Prison" isn't defined by the quality of the cell, but by the restrictions on liberties and the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible