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I will try to answer your "original" question in a roundabout way by stating that the period after the Napoleonic wars was "healthier" for France in diplomatic terms. This was true even though France lost back essentially all the territory she gained after the French Revolution. From at least the time of Louis XIV (if not XIII) until the time of Napoleon, ...


3

For the most part, France lost all of her Napoleanic territorial gains at the end. By the terms of the Treaty of Paris, concluded after the Hundred Days, France was reduced to her pre-revolution 1790 borders, with the exception of a couple of tiny enclaves surrounded by French territory that they were still allowed to keep. They had been allowed to keep a ...


0

Prussia was a great beneficiary. It had been a rising power for most of the 18th century, but its progress was set back by the Napoleonic wars, regime. Prussia was a "conservative" state that benefited for Metternich's reactionary tendencies, but the most dynamic of conservative states that also included Russia, Austria-Hungary and the Ottoman empire. As ...


4

As the wikipedia article on consols mentions, Britain actually started issuing these perpetual bonds in 1751. So their use during the Napoleonic Wars some fifty or so years later was far from unprecedented. As noted in the comments, the attractiveness of this style of loan (to the borrower) was a combination of the low interest rate and putting the ...


0

Why did Britain decide to issue perpetual bonds during Napoleonic era? They needed money to pay for war expenses. It was possible to sell the bonds without the promise to pay back the principle. Cheap year by year! Smart but unwise, see Greece today. Interest could be lowered at will, so no reason ever to pay back. Year by year there never was a ...


12

I don't have details for 1792, but the following are from James' Naval History for January 1793 (so probably good enough to get an idea of the relative strengths of the fleets). These cover the principal fleets. At Brest Ready or fitting for Sea; 1 120-gun ship of the line 2 110-gun ships of the line 4 80-gun ships of the line 12 74-gun ships of the line ...


8

France was given a lenient peace because of its importance in the European balance of power, and the fear that punishing France too much would end up giving too much power to some other European country. This was the feeling after the removal of Napoleon, who was seen as the problem, not "France." For instance, England felt that France could be a useful ...


22

The attitude in the early 19 century was somewhat different. No one considered these wars as wars "against France", I mean against the French people. These were the wars against Napoleon, and earlier the wars against the revolutionary government. So there was no notion that "France should be punished". Many French emigres were on the coalition side. It is ...



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