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I saw a documentary a few years ago - sorry, no idea who made it - postulating that during the last ice age very early humans could have sailed/walked/paddled along the edge of the ice sheet to reach America from Northern Europe. Why not? Also, people in boats could be blown over the Atlantic in a storm, supposing they had something to eat in the boat or ...


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The most sophisticated alternative theory is perhaps that of Florentino Ameghino who postulated an autochthonous evolution of species based on skeletal anthropology and diggings according to the following chart: German anthropologists, led by Hermann Burmeister, opposed this theory. Burmeister proposed a catastrophe theory of human evolution, similar to ...


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Many prominent men of science in the 19th century believed that the Indians' ancestors had always been in America. This belief draws on the theory of polygenism--that the several races had independent origins as separate species. "Scientific" polygenism also had a religious aspect called "Pre-Adamism." Polygenists/Pre-Adamists didn't need to posit ancient ...


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Early post-contact beliefs contained an unhealthy dose of myths and legends, e.g. Atlantis or that Native Americans descended from the lost tribes of Israel. These were displaced as rationalism developed, but suspicion that the Old World populated the Americas grew over time (for the alternate view, that the Natives had always been in the New World, see ...


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How would you know this? For most tribes, being illiterate and having no writings, the only way would be to ask them, and of course by that time they would know about you, so you have spoiled the experiment, so to speak. That said, the Mayans did have codices that recorded their myths and fables, notably the Popul Vuh, sometimes called "The Dawn of Life", ...


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There is a Wikipedia article on the subject of Pre-Columbian metallurgy. I would go farther than you in saying that ALL, not "most", new world indigenous cultures were based on non-metallic technology. It is true a few isolated cases of copper ornaments and such have been found, but in general, I know of no widespread use of metal tools or weapons anywhere ...


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There was a great deal of diversity in native agricultural practices, even in an area as narrow as "the East Coast." William Cronon estimates that the crop-raising Indians of southern New England maintained 287 persons per hundred square miles, while the nonagricultural natives of Maine sustained populations of 41 persons per hundred square miles. Of ...


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Farming isn't a matter of what you "require", it's a matter of how much you can get. When you are a farmer, you are always trying to grow more, because the more you can grow, the more you can sell, and the more you sell, the more money you have. Non-farmers sometimes have nutty ideas like the idea that farmers are some kind of self-reliant hermits who grow ...



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