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2

In theory, history should not enter into this. China signed the UNCLOS, which specifies exactly what their territorial rights are in that area. They clearly did so with enthusiasm, as they were one of the charter signers way back in 1982. If they didn't want to abide by that agreement, they shouldn't have promised to do so. The US (or history prior to 16 ...


8

All of the factors you mentioned did play a role in the loss of the ships. But the largest factor in the ships themselves actually blowing up was the absolute horrendousness in the ammunition handling of the battle-cruisers and basically every other British ship. To that point, the battle-cruisers also had less armour than battleships which made it easier ...


2

Tom Au has offered a solid answer about the narrow view regarding colonial claims, but those are in 2016 mostly irrelevant. What is more relevant are claims, current and future, made under the current protocols for territorial waters of UN members and exclusive economic zones. This informs the rights to resources in seas and continental shelves. (ILOS is ...


7

Prior to 1930 (1946), actually, the U.S. had claims in this area, through its possession of the Philippines. This is because the Philippines are one of 10 so-called ASEAN (Southeast Asian) nations. Even to this day, the U.S. has certain treaty rights in the Philippines. That is to say that the U.S. retains a defensive interest in Philippine affairs, even ...


1

There's an underlying question of "why would a commander choose to charge through a minefield?" The main purpose of a minefield is not to stop an attack, but to slow it down and restrict the attacker's movement while they carefully pick their way through it. A good minefield is placed in restricted terrain with clear fields of fire from the defenders, ...


2

He didn't, and didn't plan to. The minefield at the entrance to Mobile Bay was well-known and clearly marked. Its purpose wasn't to sink attacking ships, but to force them close to the guns of Fort Morgan, where they could easily be sunk by artillery fire. Farragut's initial plan for the battle was for two columns of ships to enter the bay through the ...


7

Speaking as a former military aviation-type person myself, I can assure you that the U.S. Navy (and uncle sam's airplane army, which was one of the unofficial names of the branch I first served in, the USAF) had and have, STACKS of regulations governing when and where to land if your home carrier is unavailable. I cannot speak of direct or familial ...


1

There were airfields being built starting with Gudalcanal of course. As the War progressed many more Airfields would be created...some of which are even airports today. If you Google search "Navy Seabees" you'll understand an amazing expertise that US servicemen gained by fighting the "island hopping campaign"...one that had a major impact back here in the ...


37

Yes, the bit in Master and Commander was based upon the real life action between the 14-gun H.M.B Speedy and a Spanish 32-gun Xebec-frigate named El Gamo in 1801. The British commander, Lord Thomas Cochrane, pulled off a series of bluffs to allow his ship to get along side. The Spanish captain was supposedly killed by the first broadside fired by the Speedy ...


12

Aircraft losses in carrier battles could be staggering. At Midway the United States lost the Yorktown with a capacity of 90 planes, but they also lost 113 carrier planes. Some of the surviving aircraft from Yorktown landed on Enterprise, refueled and rearmed, and attacked the Japanese again in the afternoon. A slightly different principle applied during ...


12

This happened many times during the period of World War 2, such as in the Battle of Coral Sea and Battle of Midway (Japan versus United States). During the Battle of Coral Sea the aircraft carrier of Japan, IJN Shoho was destroyed while its aircraft still in the air. They didn't have the technology to communicate to locate their main force. So they ditched ...


-1

The Manchu Dynasty used flags to coordinate their massive Armies which conquered all of China in and around 1600. Since the Portuguese had already sailed as far by then it is interesting to speculate that Europe had developed an advanced system of "flagging techniques" prior to the Manchu...and perhaps used in this engagement which lasted for some time. (...


7

There's very little concrete evidence about how command and control of the Spanish Armada worked, or indeed, how naval tactical control was exerted during that period, which pre-dates what we now call the Age of Sail. Most of the documentation that has survived from the Armada is correspondence that is essentially at the political level, i.e. between the ...


4

For battle plans and such, they used dispatch boats (which they then called "Aviso" or "Adviso", as in advice boat). These would carry orders from shore to ship and from ship to ship. For maneuvers, like Pieter said: flags and horns. Lanterns at night for guiding purposes - as seen here, resulting in a scattered English fleet when Drake snuffed it for more ...



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