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4

In order to be strategically pointless, it must be the case that a victory the other way would have had a negligibly different effect on subsequent historical events. Consider the possibility that as the two British columns approach the French/Spanish line of battle a fluke shot explodes the magazine on Royal Sovereign at the head of the Lee Column (think ...


4

Japan was limited to a 3:5 ratio of BBs vs the United States. In the climactic battle they expected in the western Pacific with their war plan, they would have put the heavy cruisers in with the BBs in order to try and redress the balance. IJN heavy cruisers carried heavy torpedo batteries to attack US BBs and the 6 inch cruisers allowed under the London ...


0

Most of the "pre-missile" cruisers were HEAVY cruisers that emerged as a "cross" between battlecruisers and light cruisers. Battle cruisers represented an experiment in the design of ships with battleship caliber armament, that were faster than battleships (and presumably better for pursuit), at the sacrifice of armor protection. Admirals soon found that ...


2

Cruisers are built to be fast and be able to operate independently. A tin can (DD, DE) might be fast too, but they are fragile and can't carry much fuel. They often had to be topped off from Carriers or other large ships in an operation. Destroyers are also too small to have all the amenites you might need off on your own - certain equipment and medical ...


1

During the 1950s the main role was for shore bombardment, since cruisers had the biggest guns (battleships no longer being maintained). During the Korean War that was their most important function. Also, my guess is that strike forces liked to have them because of their logistics strength. Cruisers are big ships with all kinds of amenities like dentist ...


7

You have a very limited understanding of the employment of cruisers in the time frame you are interested in. As far as I am aware Guerre de Course was a rather minor role for (purpose built) cruisers in the 20th century. Their main roles appear to have been: Protection of trade (rather than raiding it) Scouting (before the dominance of aircraft) Acting as ...


1

The other answers are all correct and worth an upvote. Money, land-bound, defensive mentality were factors. However, I will add one key element the others have not mentioned, which is that it was a deliberate part of their strategy. Soviet military planners considered the United States to be a threat to their polity and they deliberately made an "anti-USA" ...


1

While this is unlikely to be the average, it should provide a relatively accurate impression of the kind of stores carried by and 18th Century ship. The Victualing Board of the Royal Navy allowed the following provisions for every person serving on one of His Majesty's Ships (per week): 7 Pounds Bisket 7 Gallons of Beer/Measures of Wine 4 Pounds Beef 2 ...


3

Before WWI torpedoes and torpedo boats had a much greater impact on naval tactics than submarines which were still generally considered a bit of a novelty. The Revolutionary War and Civil War examples were essentially weapons of desperation against a vastly superior blockading force and not particularly successful. Torpedo Boats were a different story as a ...


1

If you're willing to accept the Navy of South Carolina as being part of the US Navy, then the Indien/South Carolina, built in an Amsterdam shipyard in 1778, seems to meet your criteria. It was built to order as a warship rather than being converted from an existing merchant ship, for some government that eventually became the United States. The only thing ...


1

We still have an active shipyard on Guam and at Guantanamo. We have had other shipyards overseas in the past, but the rest of them have been turned over to the local government. The only exception is the shipyard on Pago Pago which was turned over to the Department of the Interior. http://www.shipbuildinghistory.com/history/shipyards/3public.htm


5

The Rodney actually fired torpedoes at the Bismarck during their battle, but missed. The torpedoes carried by Rodney & Nelson (a very unusual class of BB - all 3 primary turrets were fore and none were aft, they were the first to be designed specifically for the Naval Treaty limitaations, and they were the last battleships to be armed with torpedoes at ...


11

In researching the HMS Dorsetshire I came across a reference to "The Ship That Sank Herself" which lead to an article on ships that torpedoed themselves which includes the British light cruiser HMS Trinidad. HMS Trinidad was taking part in Arctic convoy duty in 1942 when she engaged the German destroyer Z-26. Although she sank the destroyer, one of the ...


11

In the Battle of Savo Island the Japanese cruisers repeatedly hit US and Australian ships with torpedoes. There was only 1 destroyer present versus 7 cruisers, and it is likely that most if not all of the torpedo hits that sunk 3 cruisers and led to another being scuttled were from the cruisers. Certainly the US Navy credited to them. Also: The British ...



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