New answers tagged

1

I have 2 of my father's pictures from his service in the Royal Navy in WW2-they are identical to this and it is HMS Lysander-fleet minesweeper.


2

According to the Life of Lieut.-Admiral de Ruyter by G. Grinnell- Milne the wounding of the admiral was kept secret not only from the French but from the ships of his own fleet. The wound was very serious, badly mangling his foot and breaking his shin. Captain Callenburgh took over command of the Eendraught when the admiral was wounded and conducted the ...


2

For what it's worth, the Wikipedia article on inverted bows notes that Inverted bows maximize the length of waterline and hence the hull speed. Inverted bows were popular on battleships and large cruisers in the early 20th century. They fell out of favour, as they were very wet on high speeds and heavy seas, but have made a comeback on modern ship design. ...


4

Generals Scharnhorst and Gneisenau were co-founders of the German General Staff, having been appointed by King Frederick William III after Prussia's defeat by Napoleon in 1806. They reformed the Prussian army from a small, elite, professional army, to a semi-professional "mass" army that served the country better in later fighting against Napoleon, against ...


7

What was the reason of C-shaped bows in 19th century and WW1? Was it the same as a ram in ancient galleys? Why did everybody expect to ram enemy's ship? Were there any successful attempts in the age of heavy naval artillery? It actually depends on which ship you are talking about from that era. In the British naval world the HMS Dreadnought actually ...



Top 50 recent answers are included