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Hitler split up his Eastern Front army... Bad decision.. He should have kept his army intact, took the oil fields of southern Russia and while having his army intact, he could have taken and kept Stalingrad... He tried to swallow a huge 5 course meal in one bite and inevitably choked to death.


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A number of things went wrong in the German advance on Stalingrad. One of them is that after Paulus made it to the Volga in late August, 1942, he was supposed to chase the Russians into Stalingrad where the Luftwaffe would supposedly bomb them to death. But the Luftwaffe bombed Stalingrad before the Russians retreated, which is to say that most of them ...


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The problem was that Stalingrad is actually a huge city. It lies for miles on the west bank of the Volga. The Volga in many places is a mile wide or more and if defenders are in the city it would be easy to supply them by barge from the river. Establishing a force on the east bank would have been pointless because there was nothing to attack there and there ...


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The answer is Hitler. He was obsessed with the political damage the falling of a city named "Stalingrad" would have upon Stalin and the USSR, and wanted it more or less destroyed, so he explicitly ordered von Paulus not to encircle the city and wait for it to die(as the normal procedure would be), but to capture and raze it. Paulus was hesitant, but ...


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The Germans changed the gauge from Russian to German and could then use their own equipment. http://www.lexikon-der-wehrmacht.de/Zusatz/Heer/Eisenbahnpioniere.htm shows Wehrmacht railroad engineers (the military sort of engineer) changing the gauge. Reichsbahn personnel, civilians and forced laborers were also used to change the gauge.


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As you asked, They did not have a treaty that "made" them attack their targets at specific times (they did have treaties of mutual protection though). But to answer why they did, Germany at that time figured that they had Britain bottled up and blockaded so it could do no harm to them, and they already controlled all of mainland Europe. They attacked the ...


8

Actually, the problems were worse than just rebuilding the railroads to narrow the gauge. Soviet stations, where trains were refuelled were too far apart for German engines - the larger Soviet engines carried more fuel and water and could go farther. The Germans had to rebuild the railroad to a narrower and also create new stations along the path to ...


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It was more of a nuisance, than a reason for defeat. The part of a track that is hard to build is the bed. To narrow a track, all you have to do is pull out the spikes, move the rail and drive the spikes back in again. The bigger problem for the Germans was that the rail system in Russia is a hub-and-spokes design where all roads lead to Rome, meaning ...


33

The overall answer is that the Soviets were not rich in railways and destroyed much of it as they retreated. The Germans anticipated this, and had railway commandos rebuild much of the Soviet trunk lines and some feeders to standard gauge. They also maintained several of the wide gauge lines if captured intact and with enough rolling stock. Some efforts, ...


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Both question and answer /comments appear very Americo-centric. I was born in 1949, just 2 years after the OP, and I cannot remember not knowing about the 2nd WW and the atrocities. We did not study the war at school, but as someone said, it was not "history" - it was our parent's and older siblings lived experience. Whilst the word "Holocaust" was not ...


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There appears to be an explanation in the book Generations by (the late) William Strauss and Neil Howe. It has to do with kinds of people, specifically generations, that became teachers immediately after World War II. The older of these two was the so-called World War II generation. This generation provided the soldiers that beat the Nazis, but having ...


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http://www.ihr.org/jhr/v15/v15n1p-2_Irving.html More and more episodes occurred to give him reasons to dislike Jews. After Horst Wessel, a young Nazi stormtrooper who composed the hymn that subsequently became the second national anthem of Nazi Germany, was murdered in early 1930 by a communist in Berlin, it was a Jew who gave refuge to the murderers when ...


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Smoking was allowed on the hydrogen filled zeppelin, the Hindenburg, but only in a specially made pressurized smoking room. the smoking room was separated from the rest of the passenger section by a double-door airlock. The smoking room was closely monitored at all times by a member of the zeppelin’s staff, and only one electric lighter was ...



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