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Antony Beevor launched a book which covers the whole war. It is interesting not only because he has good writing skills, but also because he had access to British secret documents that were not available during 20th century.


1

Original SS (like Leibstandarte) units were better than common Herr divisions, because they had not only better weapons but also because they had more (volunteer) men. These units were quite effective in combat because they were more risk-takers, but the cost was that they had more losses as well. I'd say that compared to elite units of german Army, like ...


3

I am aware that these units often had priority for reinforcements and supplies, but how effective were they in combat compared to non-SS formations? It depends on which formations are being compared. The best Waffen-SS units (e.g. Das Reich, LSSAH, Wiking) were every bit as good as the best Heer units (Grossdeutschland, Lehr, Deutsches Afrika ...


1

Heer had an excellent tradition of troop replenishment (training reinforcements before throwing them into battle). However, as the war progressed, Heer started to founder under the mounting pressure of numeric and material superiority of the Red Army (also, the losses among battle veterans mounted and the troops became weaker). Hitler, faced with a ...


0

One reason why Hitler did not become an Austrian nationalist was because it was impossible at that time. When Hitler was a child and a young adult deciding his world views, there was no Austrian nation, but an Austrian Empire containing citizens of many nationalities. So Hitler could have become an Austrian Imperialist as he was more or less taught in ...


3

There are a couple of different questions here ... Could people view public records? A very qualified yes. Some people could view some public records. Public life had to go on. People bought and sold houses, not just during Arianization. There were ordinary civil and criminal trials, not just political trials. Could people sue the state? A qualified yes. ...


3

I have one reference about "sue the Government" in the Nazi Germany, though it is not about eugenics. When Jewish professors were dismissed, David Hilbert (the most famous German mathematician of the time), who was 71 in 1933 asked his colleagues: why don't you sue the government? Everyone looked at him as if he lost his mind. Reference: Constance Reid, ...


-1

Look at history Manstein was a true soldier not a political figure. This was shown by Churchill appreciating this fact and contributing to his defense during the war crimes trial. If Germany had won the war how many American and English high ranking figures would have been on trial? The man was dedicated soldier and should be respected for his genius.


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My take is that it's a casual, and perhaps older version of the Nazi salute. Hitler talks about the origin of the salute, which he refers to as the "German Salute", which is recorded in Hitler's Table Talk, a collection of notes on his monologues, which is freely available online. The military salute is not a fortunate gesture. I imposed the German ...


1

In 1941, future President Harry Truman reportedly advocated a "bait and bleed" strategy that, "If we see that Germany is winning we ought to help Russia, and if Russia is winning we ought to help Germany, and that way let them kill as many as possible." General George Patton suggested re-arming 26 German divisions and working with them to kick back the ...


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This is explained in the Wikipedia article. In summary, the Nazi salute by anyone but Hitler symbolized their offering of their loyalty to Hitler. Hitler's salute symbolized his acceptance of that loyalty.


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My father served on the Eastern Front from 1943-45, as a non-commissioned officer for one of the Axis minor allies. He had at least heard rumors of a plan to surrender to the Western Allies, who would then unite with Germany to drive the Red Army out of Europe. It is a fact that the Western Allies were not going to go for such a plan, but it is indicative ...


1

I mean, apart from the fact the British and Americans met, planned, collaborated, shared intelligence etc separately from the Russians, which, yes, was a problem for the Soviet Union Stalin in his letter to Roosevelt on 7th April 1945 cited yet another reason to doubt the loyalty of USA: It is hard to agree that the absence of German resistance on ...



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