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1

I really doubt this is more than an urban legend for a few reasons: Bomber Command. The RAF had an explicit night-time area bombing strategy, targeting Dusseldorf multiple times (for example in September 1942 and July 1943). Unless the Old Town was very lucky it would have been flattened. Precision Bombing Isn't. In contrast to the RAF, the USAAF had a ...


2

Nobody mentioned that Hitler also withstood several internal party votings to the position of the party leader. It is difficult to say whether these votings were fair and what would happen if he failed to secure the majority, but at least we know that Mussolini was deposed by the internal party means.


0

Not Nazism, but I would point you to a man called Jakob Meckel, who was the founding instructor of the Japanese Army War College. Literally all of the Japanese Army high command then was his student, or his student's student, or so on. Their army high command was far more drawn to Prussia and Germany culturally than they were to the United States or ...


0

I'd like to start by saying that, at least up until 1942, neither of the two openly advocated racism against any ethnic or religious group. Nor do we find racism to be a salient feature in the society of the two countries at the time. Rather, much of the horrendous acts of World War 2 were done out of a mentality shaped by bigotry. It was generally believed ...


0

In many ways it was an alliance based on "my enemies enemy is my friend" After the Washington Naval Treaty Japan was very unhappy with the manner in which she was treated. In particular the UK was already distancing itself; having been strong allies in the Great War we were prepared to sacrifice this for a convenient political solution that saved us money ...


-2

You are asking several questions in your post and the subject line which have to be answered separately: What was the plan for foreigners? What actually happened to them? Did it matter if they were from friendly, hostile, or neutral countries? The Nazi goal was a world ruled by so-called 'germanic races', with some so-called 'lesser' races put in ...


14

I believe that your textbook used an inappropriate level of precision in the number 52. Even if there were documents with such a classification of their victims, using them would concede that Nazi definitions were an useful guide to their killings and persecutions. In the 1920s and early 1930s, the nazis were engaged in paramilitary violence which might be ...


23

Across the country, meaning only looking at victims in Germany and not the Nazi occupied territories, these were mainly Socialists, Jews, gypsies, certain religious groups, homosexuals, mentally handicapped people, pastors and priests who publicly voiced their resentment of the Nazis, German women who had a relationship with anyone deemed worthless by the ...


-2

Hitler went to war as he wanted "Lebensraum" for his people, literally, "living room" and for that he needed Russia, specifically the Ukraine and European Russia Maybe this is true, maybe he thought he needed Russia for its people but: Russia is rather cold. At least colder than Germany. In the "Mein Kampf" book he mentions that germanic people are not ...


-1

One clarification. Spain was not invaded by the Nazis because it was already Nazi. Between WWI and WWI the Spanish Civil Was happened. It was the communists against the royal crown. The communist defeated the royals (catholics, of course) and created the Spanish Republic. And when the communist were about to give the final blow to the royals, Franco, a ...


5

Most Nazi concentration camps were not death camps. The Nazis ran dozens and dozens of camps, but only 4 of the camps (Chelmno, Treblinka, Sobibor and Belzec) were intended solely for extermination purposes. All 4 existed in a state of extreme isolation and secrecy during the war. The work camp at Majdanek was converted to an extermination camp late in the ...


2

Both may well be true. It also depends on your definition of "death camp". While some camps were designed and built from the outset as extermination camps, and these had very little in the way of other facilities except some barracks for the workers, most were designed and built as prison facilities, work camps, and temporary holding facilities for prisoners ...


2

Dachau concentration camp was set up in 1933 to imprison political opponents of the Nazi regime, mainly communists. Non-communist Jews began to be sent there in 1938. Unlike Auschwitz, it was never a “death camp” in the strict sense of the word, but of course lots of prisoners died there.


11

The policies against the Jews developed gradually. The Wikipedia article on Holocaust gives a rather complete history. Complete extermination was decided on at the Wannsee conference in 1942. Many camps had a dual purpose, they were both labour camps and extermination camps, like the most well-known of them in Auschwitz-Birkenau. It is indeed hard to tell ...


2

Great question! In this case "Tea Drinker" is more precise. According to Hans Rothfels and Theordor Eschenburg in "Dokumentation: Zur Ermordung des Generals Schleicher, 'Vierteljahrshefte fur Zeitgeschichte,' Ernst Roehm, chief of the SA, wanted to continue the Nazi Revolution. This of course was problematic to Hitler who absolutely despised "Bolshevism." ...


4

I would first like to ask the OP, Fixed Point, what years you went to highschool (or whatever grade(s) was taught WW2), and if possible, what American state you learned it in? Myself, I went to 7th thru 11th grade in late 90's early 2000's in Florida, in a very small private christian school, where every book was a Beka book (you can look up that publisher, ...



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