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0

I think the answer is no, and in any case there are a variety of material and strategic factors, like a set of common enemies, that would make it hard to say that ideology was a driving force in the alliance between Germany and Japan. Asking as someone from the US, you also have to keep in mind that our perspective is biased. It's easy to focus on the ...


0

I think he was only partially right and this is because the units transferred were SS units. In the east, the SS fought both its racial and ideological enemies (the Bolshevik Jewry; which was mostly propaganda, but people believed it). There it was in its element, both as regards the savagery of fighting and the atrocities inflicted on the civilian ...


5

One answer would be that a military "contingency plan" of sorts was written into Fall Weiß itself - the operational plan for the invasion of Poland was written so as to begin no later than September 1st, 1939. However, it is probably very unlikely that the invasion of Poland would have been canceled if Treaty of Non-aggression hadn't been signed prior to ...


1

Hitler was not in the practice of making "detailed contingency plans". He was more of "failure is not an option" type guy. If you read Speer's book, "Inside the Third Reich" you will find that it makes clear Hitler considered the pact with the Soviet Union an essential precursor to attacking Poland. The strategic situation demanded this for several reasons. ...


0

First, the Soviet Union and Germany never agreed to attack Poland or share it. They agreed on spheres of influence, which would come into play with 'border changes'. Said 'border changes' did not mean an invasion. Hitler had accomplished much without war and there was little reason for him to think he would not get away with victimizing Poland with no ...


2

This was true of government, not so much of technical managers. However it is likely that a technical manager would have been a Party member because technocrat types tended to be attracted to the NSDAP because of its ideology of applying "science" to society and government, and its willingness to give power to "experts" to formulate and implement policies. ...


4

The Nazis did not spend that much time regarding Bulgaria. The country was important for access to Greece and, eventually maybe, Turkey and the Middle East. Its tobacco kept German soldiers in cigarettes. As long as it was docile, it wasn't worth Germany's attention. That was just the way Bulgaria liked it, since in return they got territory from Yugoslovia, ...


5

Yes and no. Reasons for YES: Both were anti-communist and had geopolitical claims against the Soviet Union. Both were rebelling against the international order created by established powers as established in the settlement of World War I. Both were obsessed with economic autarky and wanted to build land empires to achieve it. Germany vis-a-vis "the ...


-2

Did ideological similarity play a role in Imperial Japan's decision to ally with Nazi Germany? A: nope...they made this decision at a time were there was no Nazi Germany... the axis germany/italy/japan were basically formed at the end of WW1 as a result of the treaty of Versailles -> their claims has been ignored during the peace negotiations... ...


0

I would say no (well, you wanted a clear answer). The ideological differences between Germany and Japan (and Italy) was greater than the similarities. Keep in mind that at Winston Churchill hated Jews as much as Hitler and at that time racism was very common even as official policy. War makes strange bedfellows and the enemy of my enemy is my friend. There ...


6

Of course! There are major differences between the ideology of Germany, Japan and Italy, but there is one major similarity: they disliked the communists. If the immediate threat from the left was less than in Italy and Germany, it nevertheless is apparent that the establishment was alarmed by it. After 1918, when spontaneous riots over the rocketing ...


0

The common enemy was the U.S Japan's fuel supply was being blocked by the United States and the United States leadership was pro-Britain. If Hitler's ego had been restrained, he would not have declared war on the U.S. immediately after America declared war on Japan. So in reality it was more the friend of my enemy is my enemy. If Hitler had not declared war ...


8

No. For instance, you are wrong that Japan promoted racism on the official basis. In fact, throughout the war up to 1944 they conducted several international conferences against racism. This was very bold move given the position of Germany. Japan also was the government that proposed amendments to the League of Nations charter condemning racism (before the ...


15

The Japanese, Germans, and Italians primarily allied based on their late-bloomer status and desire for geopolitical revisionism. Whereas countries like England, France, Russia, and so forth had unified and developed empires in the centuries prior to industrialization, the Axis powers had not really unified and become politically and militarily centralized ...


22

I seriously doubt it. Japan was a traditional monarchy, philosophically and ideologically far closer to China than Germany. Of course both were mortal enemies and had been for centuries. Far more likely they were drawn together simply by the fact that both were shut out from the "international community" and felt slighted by the UK and US (and in case of ...


9

The Nazis certainly approved of Oliver Twist. As early as 1923 the principal Nazi newspaper Völkischer Beobachter printed a German translation of the book in instalments. See here: http://www.history.ac.uk/reviews/review/1535


6

The salaries stopped as soon as Flensburg government was dissolved. The officials and technical personnel went on with their lives - found other jobs, went home or emigrated. The buildings laid fallow until the Bundesrepublik & DDR were proclaimed in 1949, at what time they were turned to the East (in the Eastern Block) or West Germany (the rest of the ...



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