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The German military -- and indeed large parts of its economy -- were built up through short-term financial schemes. By the time the military was ready to attack on any front, those schemes were about to run out. Going to war, putting banks under direct control of the government etc. was the only way to keep the whole economy from collapsing. At the same ...


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It is worth pointing out that Germany would always have been at a huge disadvantage in a war of attrition against the USSR, they have vastly few people smaller industrial base and tactical depth. Even if they had resource wealth of the whole Middle East and Africa they would have run out of men in a year or two, what mattered more was trying to catch ...


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Britain had ridiculous amounts of coal production and Hitler was just trying not to piss them off. There was never any question that the Allies would win, and the USSR was just an easier target. Furthermore, the UK controlled the med and this made Africa nearly inaccessible. Pugsville lists additional good logistical reasons why Soviet resources were ...


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Because he wasn't a good strategic thinker and was more of an impulsive, borderline crazy, person(i even read a theory that associated his different behaviours with the use of different drugs, and frankly, it even made a little sense). In Nazi Germany, most decisions were taken by Hitler, based on his own perceptions of reality and facts, and he rarely ...


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1/ Hitler wanted to invade the soviet union and he was not a think things through throughly and take his time sort of guy,he lacked patience 2/he underestimated the difficulties in invading the soviet union and he believed the whole rotten structure would collapse. 3/Nazi Germany, it's Government, the army were run by 'yes men' no one was really going to ...


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"Eugenics," unfortunately, was a subject that was "accepted" if not popular at the time. But "pro eugenics" was not the same as pro-Nazi, even though there were some overlaps. One Roosevelt ally who was also a believer was a man named Winston Churchill, who was clearly not a "Nazi sympathizer." Most eugenicists advocated "protective" measures toward the "...


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Osborne, as well as many others at the time, was a believer that Eugenics would lead to a better world for all. Eugenics had become a popular subject well before Hitler twisted it to his goals. Eugenics was widely accepted in the U.S. academic community.[7] By 1928 there were 376 separate university courses in some of the United States' leading ...


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Earlier in the war, executing "dissidents" might have brought the Nazis some sympathy. Not so in the last year, when Germany was losing, and everyone knew who the "culprits" were. The war and the Nazis were already unpopular, and publicly executing prominent dissidents would just have underlined these facts. Nor was leaving them alive an option, because ...


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The Nazis tracked Jews, and confined them to ghettos or other Jewish quarters, in preparation for rounding up and the "Final Solution." To try to escape this, some Jews "hid." That is, their identities were known, but not their whereabouts. The story told in "The Diary of Anne Frank" is a classic in this regard. Some Jews hid their identities, using false ...


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The 2011 TV documentary by Radio Berlin-Brandenburg "Das preussische Gestüt, Neustadt/Dosse" (The Prussian Stud in Neustadt on the Dosse) about one of the oldest still existing main breeding studs and riding schools in Germany has a segment on horses during WW2: Ab 1937 bestimmen die Kriegsvorbereitungen auch die Zucht in Neustadt/Dosse. [Zitat] ...


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http://www.cs.mcgill.ca/~rwest/link-suggestion/wpcd_2008-09_augmented/wp/a/Anschluss.htm Austria ceased to exist as a fully independent nation until late 1945. A Provisional Austrian Government was set up on April 27, 1945 and was legally recognized by the Allies in the following months, but it was not until 1955 that Austria regained full sovereignty.


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http://www.zdnet.com/article/the-wwii-german-army-was-80-horse-drawn-business-lessons-from-history/ Up until 1943 the Wermacht was only 20% motorized. However, this understates the importance of mechanized transport. Consider that a significant fraction of forces were held back for defending and occupying territory, and you'll see that the percentage of ...


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Answer to this question is same with the answer of the question "Why Allies doesn't have fighter aces scoring as high as Germans?" National policies. German pilots tended to return to the cockpit over and over again until they were killed, while very successful Allied pilots were routinely rotated back to training bases to educate cadet flyers.


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Pratt and Whitney Double Wasp engine. All German and British aircraft engines were water cooled...one hit to the cowling and their planes were done. The US Aircraft and their pilots kept being able to be sent back into theater, and given the emphasis on land battle and the vastness of Russia, the entire "air space" of Western Europe was ceded to the ...


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The Germans were enormously outnumbered. They were fighting an opponent with over ten times more oil production. At the time, the US was the largest oil producer in the world. Furthermore, the Allies were the ones focusing on strategic bombing. Germany didn't invest as much resources in air defense because it had a land war in the East going on which was ...



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