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4

@NL7 has offered a fantastic answer, but I'd like to add one thing. Allocation of land was not "rational" - inheritance was complicated and it is entirely possible for a noble to have multiple non-contiguous parcels of land. It is entirely possible that a noble could inherit several strips of land that surround or enclose another noble's land.


14

Yes, the name of the process to which you are referring is subinfeudation. It's important to remember that most people only had a few meaningful things to trade - land, food, fighters, and protection. Feudalism is giving the people above you food and fighters and giving the people below you land and protection. The King was at the top and granted rights ...


0

Typically, nobles would leave their estates to their oldest sons in order to transfer them intact within a family line, and to SUPPRESS "cadet" branches. One major exception was when a younger son was unusually meritorious, particularly in battle, to the point of putting his older brothers to shame. One example was when Philip the Bold, the youngest son of ...


2

Under the feudal system, the second model was operative. The king would subdivide his kingdom among his highest ranking nobles, usually dukes, sometimes marquis or counts, in exchange for their "fealty" (pledge of allegiance). The higher ranking nobles would, in turn, subdivide their holdings among lesser nobles, viscounts and barons for the same. These ...


2

The Catherine of Taranto article you mention refers to the Orsini article, which shows the Orsini coat of arms: See the references and links at the bottom of the page. Rely on the sources rather than Wikipedia in this case. Update: This article on François Guillaume de Castelnau de Clermont-Lodève, Archbishop of Narbonne, appears relevant. He was born ...



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