Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

There are lots of dogs in paleolithic cave paintings. For example: Dogs can be used for hunting in the woods, like deer, but for hunting large herds in open areas like bison, they are not useful and are more of a nuisance than an aid. (Notice that in the above image the quarry is a deer, not an accident.) A recent journal article on the subject: New ...


3

First of all let me say that this is an excellent and well researched question. A quick recap from Wikipedia is handy: Outside the mainland of Afro-Eurasia, [...] megafaunal extinctions followed a distinctive landmass-by-landmass pattern that closely parallels the spread of humans into previously uninhabited regions of the world, and which shows no ...


3

Archaeologists may well have discovered very old signs of roped animals, but I do not think history is capable of pinpointing the exact moment it began. For one thing, the Stone Age is not exactly known for its record keeping. That said, there exists 8,000 year old rock arts of giraffes with a leash. If this was an representation of domestication ...


3

From a technical taxonomical point of view, it is impossible to have domestic dogs depicted in a Paleolithic cave painting, simply because domestication of plants and animals is one of the features of the Neolithic. So by definition, any art that depicts a canid is either Neolithic, or it is showing a wild relative such as a wolf. Now this is a bit overly ...


3

No, this interpretation is misleading. Let's say that you analyze the ancient level of inheritance where you had one hundred grand-grand-parents. Using mitochondrial DNA you can only research only one of these 100 grand-grand-parents, the single grand-grand-mother that is in the most maternal position in the tree. In other words only ...


2

This paper in Nature is fascinating - unfortunately, the chemical studies described were not performed on ancient East Asians, but it lines up with archaeological and anthropological evidence worldwide. There have only been two studies of Palaeolithic modern humans, Homo sapiens sapiens. A study of the isotope values of humans from the late Upper ...


1

Maybe; it depends a lot on how you define "species". A 'species' is generally understood as population where the all males and females can mate to produce fertile offspring -- at the very least, for large mammals. So for example, horses and donkeys can be mated, but mules (each the offspring of a male donkey and a female horse) are not fertile. However ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible