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Certainly, social and economic conditions in England are responsible for this. Wikipedia says this shortly: By the early 17th century, England was a centralized state, in which much of the feudal order of Medieval Europe had been swept away. (the article Capitalism). Similar process went on in Holland, Germany and France, but Germany was not a ...


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It was clearly a remarkable period for English scientific thought, but historians of science bicker about why. One very good reason might be the work of Sir Francis Bacon, essentialy the founding father of British 'natural philosophy. By the 1640's he had followers, described by Robert Boyle as the 'invisible college', which may refer to a group of early ...



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