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The answer is based on my talks with people of Polish origins in East Prussia and Upper Silesia and might not represent all the cases. I also do understand the answer does not cite any sources. Since about late 1944 it was clear that the territories west of Poznań and Łódź are going to be in Poland. The Allied forces which were present in Western (of 1939) ...


3

In most cases it was regional. Entire towns and provinces were expelled if they were German. When you are expelling hundreds of thousands of people at once, you don't have the time to be going person by person. You just ship out the whole county. In cases where population was mixed, the name would usually indicate whether the person was German or Polish. If ...


1

I have performed some research and in fact it seems it was not very common, and if it was - being an unintentional result of mistakes or to make life simpler for officers. In comments I've shown an example. One of main characters of All Quiet on the Western Front by E. Remarque (Am Westen nichts neues), being a Polish from Poznań (Posen), named Stanisław ...


1

Before the war, the province of Silesia was united. The League of Nation imposed autonomy of the Province of Upper Silesia within Prussia: It was separated from the Province of Lower Silesia which was almost exclusively German. A polish majority remained in almost all districts of the Upper Silesia province: Only the districts of Falkenberg, Neisse, ...


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I've found one contemporary source in the university library but it seems to be extremely biased. It's a slim 30-pages brochure called "The Poles in Germany and the Germans in Poland" by one George Kurnatowski, a political science professor from Warsaw, published in 1927. Prof. Kurnatowski is strenuosly trying to show that the Poles in Germany are ...



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