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5

Splitting up western Germany like that would've weakened western Germany as a counter to East Germany. Quickly after the war the allies saw the benefit of a strong West Germany against the Soviet bloc. This is why the plan to reduce Germany into a pastoral society with massive starvation was quietly abandoned and Marshall Plan aid became a thing instead. ...


3

The structure of post-war Germany was defined by the Allied governments and leaders, not by the Germans. Half of Wurtemberg was in the French zone, the other half in the US zone. This is what Stuttgart, one of the principal cities in Wurtemberg, looked like in 1945: People were literally building huts out of rubble as shelters. Just finding water was a ...


1

This question depend on what you mean by control. Just before the Japanese invaded Manchuria, the Nationalists controlled the most territory. But usually its a local warlord pledging to obey the government, so in reality the Nanjing government doesn't really have much control over local issues. But these warlords were made generals of the government and ...


0

Here's the thing. They made plans to kill Zhang too, if the communists came close to getting him. Yang was only killed after the president at the time, Li, ordered his release. So we can conclude Chiang was willing to keep them under guard, but will not tolerate letting them go alive.


5

tl;dr: There are multiple reasons for Chiang to treat them different. They differed in their culpability, their readiness to make amends, and their connections. Connections Chang Hsueh-liang had an extremely valuable connection in the person of Soong May-ling, the wife of Chiang Kai-shek. The two had met in Shanghai in 1925, and kept up a life long ...


1

It boils down to simple mathematics. The US electoral system is mostly based on a winner-takes-all approach (BTW, that's mostly not written into the Constitution, but rather evolved ad-hoc, for similar mathematical reasons). In a winner-takes-all system, only the two biggest vote-getters will ever have meaningful influence, so it is natural for a dualism to ...


6

The maximum extent of de facto Nationalist control in China was achieved around 1946. This is after the Second Sino-Japanese War ended, and before the Second Chinese Civil War began in earnest. At this point, the Nationalist Government had recovered all of its pre-war territories (at the height of the Nanking Decade), and made several major additions ...


1

If we're talking about the Kuomintang, then what's known as the Nanking Decade was when they held maximum power. In the very early republic Yuan Shikai controlled more territory, but not for long as his inability to stop the exploitation of China by foreign powers and his general conservatism made him very unpopular. Source: China in war and revolution, by ...


5

The shape of borders reflects the history and commerce at the time. In the eastern US, borders are often formed by geographic features because transportation at the time was very relevant - and transportation largely depended on waterways. For instance, the northern border of Indiana is straight - but it's about 10 miles further north than it would be as an ...


1

CGP Grey has a video about this nice border between Canada and the USA, and how it isn't that straight as you think. https://youtu.be/qMkYlIA7mgw edit: In this video Grey explains why the border between Canada and the US is supposed to be straight, why it isn't and some rather odd analogies.


20

Natural borders such as bodies of water prevailed where there were PEOPLE living around them. For instance, much of the eastern end of the U.S. Canadian border was defined by the Great Lakes and the St. Lawrence River. On the Maine-Canadian border, it was defined by forests used by Maine (or Canadian) loggers. In such instances, "strong fences make good ...


8

The only place you really have the large straight-line International border is West of the Great Lakes (up until Vancouver)1. Probably the most succinct reason it was made that way, rather than at natural boundaries like everywhere else, was that neither side actually had any citizens settled in that area yet. Originally (post-Louisiana Purchase), the USA ...


29

States Borders First off, most Canadian or American states' borders are not particularly straight. Even when they are supposed to be straight, there are often nooks and crannies. But indeed there's a tendency to use simple straight borders when creating a territorial entity from scratch, especially on the basis of longitude and latitudes. We see this in ...


16

I found May 1941 issues of the Izvestiya newspaper at libinfo.org, and the coverage of WWII at that time seems quite neutral. Regarding the questions, No official reaction of the Soviet authorities is mentioned at all, so I assume that if any sort of congratulations, condolescences or whatsoever were made, they were made nonpublicly. Yes, they did, and ...


5

Political expediency. A common, populist explanation is that Aurangzeb Alamgir was religiously conservative, as taninamdar has noted. However, this is certainly not the whole picture. Though his personal religious outlook may well have been an underlying bias, political considerations were at least equally important reasons for Aurangzeb's policies - if not ...


4

Yes. There was at least one case from the very start, during the 1886 election. This was of course the birth year of the Liberal Unionists, and they formed a close alliance with the Conservatives thereafter. Despite the Conservative Chief Whip's promise, three of the 93 were opposed by Conservatives, and two lost their seats to Conservatives. Those two ...


1

One of the primary aims of the Government of India Act was to weaken the rising Indian governing class, specifically, the Congress Party. For instance, Burma was separated from India altogether, and a number of Indian provinces were subdivided for "gerrymandering purposes. The idea of having "separate but equal" electorates for the classes at the bottom was ...


1

You need to realize that the Government of India Act was passed by Britain, not India, since India was a British colony at the time. Whatever Gandhi worked out with the other Indians has no effect on what the Brits do unless they convinced them it's for better for British interests, which they didn't.



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