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First, what is an official attitude, and did one exist in Williamite England? In modern times, governments try to influence public opinion by the use of spokesmen in democracies, and propaganda in dictatorships. They have a 'line' on this or that issue which they repeat, hoping to make it catch on. I suppose this is what you'd call an official attitude. ...


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Yes, it appears they did. Wikipedia's caption on the map below reads: Italian territory claims by Italian irredentism activists in the 1930s, including Nice, Ticino and Dalmatia in green, Malta in red, and later also claimed Corsica in purple "Ticino" is of course the Italian name for what German-speakers call "Tessin". How hard this was pushed ...


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Officially, If you were a Muslim in Greece, you could be exempt from compulsory deportation if you were: part of the ethnic Albanian community a resident of Thrace The Greek government had placed no restrictions on religious conversions via marriage or baptism in the same fashion that the Turkish government did. Last minute conversions to prevent ...


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The Glorious Revolution in the UK where Mary II (although mostly by her husband William of Orange, later William III) deposed her brother, James II & VII. I'm not entirely sure if it fulfils your criteria, there was not much more than a skirmish during the actual revolution, but it did result in the Jacobite uprising in Scotland and the Williamite war ...


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In 1822, Dom Pedro I led a revolution of Brazil against its mother country, Portugal, that was (nominally) headed by his father.


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Louis Philippe II the Duke of Orléans, who avidly supported the French Revolution - arguably, the quintessential revolution of the modern era. As First Prince of the Blood, he was one of the most senior members of the ruling Bourbon dynasty. In fact his son would assume the French throne in 1830. I think he qualifies both as a royal and member of the high ...



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