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Note that the first Congressional nominating caucus was in 1796, and was only to select a VP nominee. Thus the "King Caucus" system really only operated for POTUS candidates for 6 election cycles (1800-1820). In the USA, the presidential election is essentially a set of separate elections where every state simultaneously votes for its state's choice of ...


4

. . . . The election of 1824 brought an end to both the Democratic-Republican-dominated “era of good feeling” and the use of a congressional caucus as a nominating device. Although the Democratic- Republican caucus nominated William Crawford of Georgia as its candidate, three other candidates (John Quincy Adams, Henry Clay, and Andrew Jackson) ...


2

For the most part yes, as their fundamental issue in both cases was support for segregation and white supremecy. They were a bit different in theory, in that the AIP was founded as a conservative (far right) party that then courted southern whites, while the Dixiecrats were formed out of the southern Democratic party. However, in practice they both drew all ...


1

It boils down to simple mathematics. The US electoral system is mostly based on a winner-takes-all approach (BTW, that's mostly not written into the Constitution, but rather evolved ad-hoc, for similar mathematical reasons). In a winner-takes-all system, only the two biggest vote-getters will ever have meaningful influence, so it is natural for a dualism to ...



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