Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

16

Origins of Pan-Slavism Speaking as a (western) Slav, panslavism was indeed a big topic in 19th century politics. The primary reason for this seems to have been that outside of Russia, most Slavic populations were not in fact in their own nation states, but rather were subjugated by other national groups. This included, for instance, Czechs under Austrian ...


10

There were popular uprisings by English peasants (and other common folk) against the monarchy in the years preceding the Wars of the Roses (1455-1487). These rebellions give an indication of the political consciousness of some English peasants in the 15th century. The period from 1440-1480 was a time of economic depression in England known as the Great ...


9

There's not really a "specific reason" since he lost favour over some period of time, rather immediately in response to a single event. But some generally agreed factors were Stalin's paranoia and intolerance of dissent, as well as and Molotov's own personality. Vyacheslav Molotov is well known to be stubborn and independent minded. He argued with Stalin ...


6

It wasn't just about the Slavs; people everywhere were feeling this way. It essentially happened because the idea of Nationalism: that people in ethnically, geographically, culturally, and linguistically coherent areas should owe their allegiance only to their own single native governments, became a popular sentiment worldwide. Ethnic nationalism was in ...


6

Common knowledge: The One Time Pad is in theory unbreakable (and in practice if properly managed - I'm looking at you Soviet Union). This is a Poly-alphabetic substitution cipher with a random key (in effect infinity long).


5

This is a bit of a tricky question. Before speaking of historical views of homosexuality, it is very important to understand what is being spoken about. Prior to the 20th century, there really was no concept of homosexuality as we understand it today. In the late 19th century, the concept of homosexuality as an actual orientation was first proposed and ...


4

Short Answer: Jefferson was anti-Jacksonian. Madison was neither Jacksonian nor anti-Jacksonian. Longer Answer: By 1828, every serious contender for the presidency was a member of the Republican Party, so the supporters of Jackson called themselves “Friends of Jackson” or “Jacksonians” to differentiate themselves from the "Administration Republicans" or ...


4

I am considering this a reference request for seminal works on "power" in historiography. The most well known recent theorist of "power" as a historical determinant is Foucault. In Foucault's work power seems to be organised by a historical context of possibilities of knowledge, an "episteme," that orders how people perceive and enact power. I do not ...


3

I wouldn't call it "unique," but Hitler adopted the "Keynesian" prescription of "pump-priming" a depressed economy through government spending. Even if it was for military spending (which to Hitler, was a form of "investment.") This started in 1933-34, and pre-dated Keynes' 1936 tome, "A General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money." This gave Nazi ...


2

Keynes' views were widely mis-represented by his disciples, notably Joan Robinson, who was well to the left of him. Keynes was actually "orthodox" in many ways. With his emphasis on "money," he was actually closer to Milton Friedman than to the "Keynesian" doctrine he is associated with. Where he differed from "orthodoxy" was in promoting deficit-financed ...


2

Terminal train stations were built in continental Europe because many railroads connected only two cities in the early to mid 19th century. There were not many rail lines, and the stations built were terminal stations. As the railroad network increased, the terminal stations could not be converted to passthrough anymore.


2

Ever heard the phrase 'generals are always fighting the last war'? It's poignant applied to France and Britain's strategy during the Second World War, when they assumed, based on WW1, that the advantage would always be to the side using a defensive strategy. That's why they constructed the 'Maginot Line' and refused to attack Germany. Have you heard the ...


2

For a rather long while slavic peoples were a popular target for slave trade (hence the word "slave"), genocidal endeavours (such as Ottoman campaigns to Bulgaria and the Caucasus) and overlordship (such as the case of Czech republic under Austria, or, interestingly enough, Belarus under Poland). Pan-slavism developed as a form of multi-nationalism, if you ...


1

There certainly were other "pan" movements. German unification and the early expansion of Nazi Germany was driven by uniting all German speakers under one flag. Italy had a Italia Irridenta movement that looked to grabbing land from Austria Hungary. Mussolini parlayed some of this into the Fascist Party.


1

One elector went for Ronald Reagan in 1976--the first time he ran, not when he won the race.: from Wikipedia on the 1976 Electoral College results: Washington Elector Mike Padden, pledged for Republicans Gerald Ford and Bob Dole, cast his presidential electoral vote for Ronald Reagan, who had challenged Ford for the Republican nomination. He cast ...


1

It boils down to simple mathematics. The US electoral system is mostly based on a winner-takes-all approach (BTW, that's mostly not written into the Constitution, but rather evolved ad-hoc, for similar mathematical reasons). In a winner-takes-all system, only the two biggest vote-getters will ever have meaningful influence, so it is natural for a dualism to ...


1

First, a caveat; religion isn't like Height or Eye Color - you can't measure it. And "religious leaders" don't have a position, they have a constellation of positions. Criteria #3 is, in my opinion, useless; any discussion of #3 is purely about opinion; there is no way to determine what an individual's metaphysical belief might be at any given moment. ...


1

Gustav I of Sweden switched from Catholicism to Protestantism. Initially it was a conflict over the arch bishop Gustav Trolle who Gustav exiled from Sweden as Trolle took sides for the king of Denmark and was regarded as a traitor to the Swedish people. At the Council of Västerås in 1527, the monarch was given the right to confiscate property donated to the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible