Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

6

Common knowledge: The One Time Pad is in theory unbreakable (and in practice if properly managed - I'm looking at you Soviet Union). This is a Poly-alphabetic substitution cipher with a random key (in effect infinity long).


6

It really depends on what you mean by "supposed to be practically in charge". Supposed by whom ? If the war rages on and the leader does not even know, then one can confidently say that the leader does not hold the actual power, which is instead in the hands of people who perfectly know that the leader is not actually leading. One situation which is similar ...


4

I am considering this a reference request for seminal works on "power" in historiography. The most well known recent theorist of "power" as a historical determinant is Foucault. In Foucault's work power seems to be organised by a historical context of possibilities of knowledge, an "episteme," that orders how people perceive and enact power. I do not ...


4

Hmm. That's a tricky one for many reasons, which I'll hope to elucidate: One bit of "low hanging fruit" you may want to explore first is taking a look at publications such as Time, Life, and Newsweek at your local library. While you're unlikely to find every gubernatorial, Senate, or House candidate there, you'll likely find pictures of some of the major ...


3

I assume your interest is primarily in Marxist social democracy as opposed to Marxist bolshevism or Marxist council communism. Regarding social democracy: "Welfare" is a suspicious term for an avowedly Marxist party like the 1925 SPD (Germany). The Heidelberg Program (1925, http://www.marxists.org/deutsch/geschichte/deutsch/spd/1925/heidelberg.htm ) ...


3

I wouldn't call it "unique," but Hitler adopted the "Keynesian" prescription of "pump-priming" a depressed economy through government spending. Even if it was for military spending (which to Hitler, was a form of "investment.") This started in 1933-34, and pre-dated Keynes' 1936 tome, "A General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money." This gave Nazi ...


2

Keynes' views were widely mis-represented by his disciples, notably Joan Robinson, who was well to the left of him. Keynes was actually "orthodox" in many ways. With his emphasis on "money," he was actually closer to Milton Friedman than to the "Keynesian" doctrine he is associated with. Where he differed from "orthodoxy" was in promoting deficit-financed ...


2

Ever heard the phrase 'generals are always fighting the last war'? It's poignant applied to France and Britain's strategy during the Second World War, when they assumed, based on WW1, that the advantage would always be to the side using a defensive strategy. That's why they constructed the 'Maginot Line' and refused to attack Germany. Have you heard the ...


2

Short Answer: Jefferson was anti-Jacksonian. Madison was neither Jacksonian nor anti-Jacksonian. Longer Answer: By 1828, every serious contender for the presidency was a member of the Republican Party, so the supporters of Jackson called themselves “Friends of Jackson” or “Jacksonians” to differentiate themselves from the "Administration Republicans" or ...


1

Jefferson and Madison were not Jacksonians in any meaningful sense. Jefferson was President from 1801 to 1809 and died in 1826 before Jackson assumed the presidency. Madison was President from 1809 to 1817 Jackson from 1829 to 1837 I didn't find an easy source for the first use of the term "Jacksonian", but I'm willing to bet that the term as it it ...


1

First, a caveat; religion isn't like Height or Eye Color - you can't measure it. And "religious leaders" don't have a position, they have a constellation of positions. Criteria #3 is, in my opinion, useless; any discussion of #3 is purely about opinion; there is no way to determine what an individual's metaphysical belief might be at any given moment. ...


1

Gustav I of Sweden switched from Catholicism to Protestantism. Initially it was a conflict over the arch bishop Gustav Trolle who Gustav exiled from Sweden as Trolle took sides for the king of Denmark and was regarded as a traitor to the Swedish people. At the Council of Västerås in 1527, the monarch was given the right to confiscate property donated to the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible