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Here is a reducto ad Absurbum of the idea that "train" only refers to a railroad train. J.R.R. Tolkien, writer of Lord of the Rings, was a professional philologist and knew the meanings of words. In the Silmarillion chapter on the Dagor Bragollach, "The Battle of Sudden Flame", Tolkien describes a sudden attack by Morgoth, the original Dark Lord, on his ...


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When looking at why the UN does (or usually does not) do things, it's important to know two things: only resolutions by the UN Security Council are binding, and all of the permanent members have veto power. The permanent members at the time were the People's Republic of China, France, Russia, UK, and the US. With the Cold War just having ended, this was a ...


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In his lectures on iTunesU (link), Steven B. Smith reports that Aristotle wrote about many different systems of government that predated the Athenians.


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I'll differ with Anixx here. There's no evidence that democracy was the "most ancient" form of government. Anything about that is pure speculation. The origins of democracy are almost definitely in the council of kings. The Senate of the Roman Republic, for example, started out as a council of elders convened to advise the king. Elites in any situation ...


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Its not in any way a given that the desirability of a government should coincide with the length of time it manages to stick around for. Never-the-less, ancient democracies had pretty good track records as far as governments go. Sparta lasted for 400 years, Athens for 250, the Roman Republic for almost 500 years. If you include states with even more limited ...



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