Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

9

Hormisdas is of Persian origin, and he possibly took the name to honor a Persian noble named Hormizd. In the tenth century we had a Pope Landus, or Lando, and various sources say that this name is of Anglo-Saxon origin. Lando was also his given name, however, and I find it unlikely than an Italian from Sabina would have been given an Anglo-Saxon name. What ...


7

Wikipedia has a complete list of Papal names. Counting this week's Francis, 81 different names have been used. There are some names that arguably may be Italian rather than Latin (eg:Lando), but none with undisputed roots outside of those three languages. Note that etymology Online actually lists Francis as French in origin, which would make it of Romantic ...


5

The French imprisoned both Pius VI and Pius VII. You should be able to find plenty of hits during the "pornocracy" between 867–1049 CE. Leo V was imprisoned by an antipope. John X was imprisoned at the height of the pornocracy as was poor Benedict VI. John IV was another unfortunate who was imprisoned by an antipope. Then there's infamous Formosus who, ...


4

Actually I've just found out about such situation. In 1303, Philip IV of France, who was in a long conflict with Pope Boniface VIII, decided to judge the pope for his blasphemies (as a politic consequence of the papal bull Unam Sanctam). He sent Guillaume de Nogaret with 1600 soldiers to Rome. Boniface VIII tried to escape, but was found in family residence ...


4

Pope Liberius was exiled to Thrace for a while in the mid 4th century. During the early middle ages it was not unheard of for the Byzantine emperor to send people to arrest (or murder) the Pope in Rome when he started acting too independently for the emperor's taste. A prime example is Pope Martin I, who was arrested on the orders of Emperor Constans II and ...


4

I can but skim the surface of the question but let's have a go at it. The Popes were at first the Bishops of Rome and as such did not wield any political power, even after the Roman Empire became Christian. Moreover, the Roman see was not even considered the highest-ranking one within the Church. However, with the fall of the Western Roman Empire a ...


4

According to this article, Pope Sylvester II (Gerbert d'Aurillac, c943-1003), is credited with re-introducing the abacus into Europe without an explicit use of the number zero. This was because it had not been introduced in the European mathematical vocabulary (Fibonacci did this around 1202, and it took centuries for it to become established), rather than ...


3

I found a few articles, here and here. The historical inaccuracies are quite extensive, ranging from anachronisms like tomatoes, to conspiracy theories regarding the knights templar.


3

This question is difficult because it is not clear what monarchy is absolute and whether such elected office should be called monarchy rather than something else (i.e., dictatorship). One of the basic features of monarchy is inheritance of the office. As such, all elected monarchs are quite borderline cases. That said, I can name the following cases upon ...


3

The incident you asked I suppose is the Westphalia treaty, or the Peace of Westphalia (1648). In the field of international relations the treaty is widely acknowledged as a big turning point in European history, as it established each nation as a sovereign states which hold sovereignty under its own. It happened before the Enlightenment era and closely ...


2

I believe in this matter, the Pope was acting much like we use the UN or international standards organizations like IETF or ISO today: as an independent international organization respected by all parties. The main factor that diminished this authority was the rise of the protestant northern countries (England, Holland, and much of Germany). Protestant ...


2

By the cast listing on IMDB, it's Charles VIII which makes sense as he started the Italian Wars. He was the last king of France to be a full Valois. The actor who plays him is a good 20 years older than Charles VIII would have been at the time.


2

The real key to the Pope becoming a temporal lord was not the Fall of the Western Empire, but later. When Odoacer became King in Italy after 476, and Theodoric the Ostrogoth after him, the Popes were normal (if influential) clerics and with land in and around Italy and Sicily. These rulers were Aryan Heretics, so the Orthodox Popes were restive but still not ...


2

As you rightly say, the history of the pope's temporal power is sure to be complicated, but I would think the following points should be noteworthy as an overview. To begin with, it is probably reasonable to assume that the Pope held non-trivial worldly authority ever since the Emperor Theodosius made the Christian church the state religion of the Roman ...


2

Around the turn of the 15th and 16th centuries, Popes such as Alexander VI and Julius II greatly expanded the territory, and resulting secular power of the Papal States.(The territory controlled by the Popes then encompassed most of north-central Italy except for Tuscany.) Coincidentally or otherwise, this coincided with the decline of Popes' temporal power. ...


2

We will not know it for sure until the KGB archives are open (and that will never happen). However, the Soviets were indiscriminately opportunistic in their ideological warfare (the motto being "We do not penny-pinch on ideology" - "На идеологии мы не экономим"), and it is hard to imagine that they would have passed an opportunity to discredit an adversary, ...


1

Most nobles of the Middle Ages felt that they owed allegiance to TWO kings: 1) the king of their country, and 2) God, their heavenly king, for whom the Pope was the "viceroy" (vice-king) for Christians. If anything, the Pope, as God's "representative" held greater sway over the nobles than the national king, because the Pope could quite literally tell the ...


1

This question needs a great deal more substantiation, but we can look to three fundamental factors that provided the base for the power of the Church and the Papacy in Medieval Western Europe: Catholic Justified Submission - precursor to The Divine Right of Kings was perhaps the most important single factor empowering the Church and the Pope in Medieval ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible