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In general, the treatment of Jewish POWs was at the "low end" of what it was for others of their "nationality." POWs who were Soviet Jews were treated very badly--because they were Soviets. Things were a bit worse for men who were both Soviets and Jews, but it was basically "Soviet" that determined their treatment. POWs who were American or British were ...


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The Jewish POWs of Western nations were separated from other POWs, moved to a separate camp at Berga and assigned more hard work. In about 2 months in one camp where the Jews were assigned mining works, 20% of them perished. This is compared to 2% of death rate among non-Jewish POWs. Fortunately to the imprisoned Jews, the war soon came to the end, so only ...


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British and American POW's were treated as POW's. Soviet Jewish POW's were usually treated as Jews, if their national origin could be determined. The justification was that Soviet Union did not sign the international convention about POW's. Of course, this was the official point of view, but actual treatment depended on commanders in the field. Official ...


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Nazi doctrine developed in the 1920s from pre-existing anti-semitic and other racist tendencies, and placed Jews amongst the Untermensch - essentially "not quite human". The Russians were categorised with Slavs, and were also "not quite human". Western Allied people (French, British, American) fell into a category that was considered to be compatible with ...


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I'll try to explain briefly the big picture, because the full answer would be book length. So this answer is simplified and designed to give you a good idea about where to keep learning. The Nazis had a concept of Scientific racism. This led them to define the "Jewish problem" and to therefore define Jews as sub-humans. They then created the ...



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