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18

The actual quote which is attributed to Mayer Amschel Rothschild is: Permit me to issue and control the money of a nation, and I care not who makes its laws! A number of sources (such as this one) claim that this statement was made in 1838 (which would have been a difficult feat as he would have been dead for 26 years by then). Wikiquote claims that ...


16

@YannisRizos answered the question. It is not known what he said, but the result was that the Roman masses became very angry with Caesar's murderers, burnt down their houses and made them flee from he city. Livius Appian's transcript of Mark Anthony's funeral oration, suggests that Shakespeare wrote for the stage, not for historical accuracy (although ...


13

It does look suspicious to me. It's tough to put my finger on, but the phraseology doesn't look very 18th century. It doesn't sound like other Jefferson writing to me either. Also Jefferson is a rather conveniently famous and beloved figure to tag it onto if you aren't sure (or don't happen to like who really said it...) With a fairly thorough googling, I ...


10

You are possibly referring to this: After visiting these two places you can easily see how that within a few years Hitler will emerge from the hatred that surrounds him now as one of the most significant figures who ever lived. He had boundless ambition for his country, which rendered him a menace to the peace of the world, but he had a mystery ...


9

I am not well enough read in French history and governance to offer a good answer, so I shall offer a poor answer. My understanding of the comment is that all the governance of France originated in and was legitimized by Louis. What we now call the legislative, executive and judicial functions of the government were vested in Louis' person. Any of these ...


8

If you'll take Ken Jennings as a source (as he does seem to know his literature), he not only agrees that there is no evidence that Louis XIV said this, but goes a step further and says that Louis XIV probably wouldn't have said it. He claims not only that it wasn't true that the French monarch was equivalent to the state, but that Louis XIV probably didn't ...


8

A quick Google search solves this question. Pausing at the tomb of Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette, he [John J. Pershing] was reputed to have uttered the famous line "Lafayette, we are here," a line spoken, in fact, by his aide, Colonel Charles E. Stanton. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_J._Pershing That statement cites ...


7

Wikiquote renders it No one dances sober, unless he is insane. The quotation is Nemo enim fere saltat sobrius, nisi forte insanit. from Pro Murena vi.13, 63 BC. Cato has accused L. Murena of dancing, and Cicero replies that Murena is accused of dancing but not of activities that would be precursors to dancing. Cicero says no sane man would ...


6

According to Google Books the book "Respectfully Quoted: A Dictionary of Quotations" edited by Suzy Platt says that this came from a letter to S Stanwood Menken in 1917 and was read by Roosevelt's sister to a national meeting that same year. Sounds legit.


6

Short Answer The Kidnapper is the United States/Roosevelt. The Hooligan is Britain/Churchill. The Bully was the Soviet Union/Stalin. For reference, this is the original passage from Chiang's diary: 聯合國中之四國,我為最弱,甚以弱者遇拐子、流氓與土霸為可危,也識知:人非自強,任何人亦不能為助。而國家之不求自強,則無論為敵為友,皆一汝為俎上之肉,可不戒懼? Of the four members of the United Nations, we are the weakest; it is ...


5

Those words were spoken by Adlai E. Stevenson in one of his campaign speeches for the 1952 U.S. presidential election. The full quote is as follows: What do we mean by patriotism in the context of our times? I venture to suggest that what we mean is a sense of national responsibility which will enable America to remain master of her power--to walk with ...


5

This quote is being attributed to Winston Churchill, e.g. here: http://runmen.mmm-tasty.ru/entries/3465785. The Russian text on that page is literally the one you asked about (and the book you were reading is apparently this one). While it sounds like something that Churchill could have said given the British WW2 history, all the citations have a newer date ...


5

It is pretty hard to prove a negative in the social sciences (consider how many people still believe the The Protocols of the Elders of Zion hoax!) but I would bet that Brzezinski never said anything like that - this is an extremely stupid thing to say, and I don't think he is that stupid. The "New world order" was the expression used by Bush-1 to describe ...


5

As was already mentioned, the quote comes from letter to S. Stanwood Menken, dated 1917-01-10. You can read the full wording of the letter at Theodore Roosevelt Digital Library. Your quote is on the page 2.


3

http://www.ji.lviv.ua/n14texts/brzez-pr.htm Here is an original Brzezinski speech on ceremony of giving him the status of honorary citizen of Lviv (in ukrainian). There's no word about the U.S. hegemony and no word against Russia, only about Ukraine as outpost of the West, google translate will help you;)


3

If Louis XIV did indeed say such a thing, what can we make of it? Actually, I could see where his statement makes a bit of sense. Under modern political theory there are multiple roles in government: Head of State, Head of Government, Commander in Chief, etc. Under a parlimentarty system, typically these may all be different people. However, for a true ...


3

The most all encompassing quote I can find is this: The newspaper report that about a fortnight ago my eldest son Harilal, now nearing fifty years, accepted Islam and that on Friday last 29th May in the midst of a large congregation in the Juma Masjid at Bombay he was permitted to announce his acceptance amid great acclamation and that after his speech ...


2

Yes, I'm having trouble too locating it in the 1839 L'Organisation du travail. The earliest mention I've been able to find is from Louis Blanc 1851 brochure Plus de Girondins page 92: http://books.google.ca/books?id=KFc9AAAAcAAJ&pg=PA92 supported by the French Wikipedia ...


2

The quote is from the chapter on Demosthenes on Lives of the Ten Orators, by Pseudo-Plutarch: γενόμενος δὲ καὶ ἐν τῇ Ὀλυμπιακῇ πανηγύρει καὶ ἀκούσας Λαμάχου τοῦ Τερειναίου Φιλίππου καὶ Ἀλεξάνδρου ἐγκώμιον ἀναγινώσκοντος Θηβαίων δὲ καὶ Ὀλυνθίων κατατρέχοντος, παραναστὰς ἀρχαίων ποιητῶν μαρτυρίας προηνέγκατο περὶ τῶν Θηβαίοις καὶ Ὀλυνθίοις καλῶς ...


2

The saying is apocryphal and was originated by the populist author T. Cushing Daniel in his testimony before the U.S. Congress in 1911 in hearings on House Resolution 314 (whether financiers were restricting trade by domination of the money supply). This is what Daniel said: William Pitt made this statement: "Let the American people go into their ...


2

Yes, Christopher Marlowe wrote that. He was rather interested in Niccolò Machiavelli, and Tamburlaine (the play) reflects a bit of this influence, in the sense that it was a criticism of Machiavellian thoughts. His Tamburlaine (the character) can and has been seen as a sort of Machiavellian chivalrous mass murdering hero/villain, and the passage in question ...


1

The original Russian version is Железной рукой загоним человечество к счастью. The images Google found: all show fragments of the same photograph which absolutely could NOT have been made in Solovki. The reason is that the orthography of the text is the old (pre-revolutionary) one. By 1923 when the prison camp was created, the new orthography was quite ...


1

America was the kidnapper, Russia was the hooligan, and Britain was the bully. Chiang was most afraid of America, because its affluence made it easy to seduce or corrupt Chinese people, particularly "young" people. "Kidnapper" was arguably a bad translation; "Pied Piper" or even "hijacker" would have been better. Russia was the hooligan because of its many ...


1

What he (probably) meant by it (who can say for sure now?) is that of all the possible means a government has to control and influence its people, the issueing of money is the most powerful one. Even more powerful than law. By creating new money, the government can decrease the value of the existing money in circulation, thereby lowering the buying power of ...



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