Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

13

It does look suspicious to me. It's tough to put my finger on, but the phraseology doesn't look very 18th century. It doesn't sound like other Jefferson writing to me either. Also Jefferson is a rather conveniently famous and beloved figure to tag it onto if you aren't sure (or don't happen to like who really said it...) With a fairly thorough googling, I ...


11

The actual quote which is attributed to Mayer Amschel Rothschild is: Permit me to issue and control the money of a nation, and I care not who makes its laws! A number of sources (such as this one) claim that this statement was made in 1838 (which would have been a difficult feat as he would have been dead for 26 years by then). Wikiquote claims that ...


8

A quick Google search solves this question. Pausing at the tomb of Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette, he [John J. Pershing] was reputed to have uttered the famous line "Lafayette, we are here," a line spoken, in fact, by his aide, Colonel Charles E. Stanton. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_J._Pershing That statement cites ...


6

Wikiquote renders it No one dances sober, unless he is insane. The quotation is Nemo enim fere saltat sobrius, nisi forte insanit. from Pro Murena vi.13, 63 BC. Cato has accused L. Murena of dancing, and Cicero replies that Murena is accused of dancing but not of activities that would be precursors to dancing. Cicero says no sane man would ...


5

I am not well enough read in French history and governance to offer a good answer, so I shall offer a poor answer. My understanding of the comment is that all the governance of France originated in and was legitimized by Louis. What we now call the legislative, executive and judicial functions of the government were vested in Louis' person. Any of these ...


5

If you'll take Ken Jennings as a source (as he does seem to know his literature), he not only agrees that there is no evidence that Louis XIV said this, but goes a step further and says that Louis XIV probably wouldn't have said it. He claims not only that it wasn't true that the French monarch was equivalent to the state, but that Louis XIV probably didn't ...


5

Those words were spoken by Adlai E. Stevenson in one of his campaign speeches for the 1952 U.S. presidential election. The full quote is as follows: What do we mean by patriotism in the context of our times? I venture to suggest that what we mean is a sense of national responsibility which will enable America to remain master of her power--to walk with ...


4

This quote is being attributed to Winston Churchill, e.g. here: http://runmen.mmm-tasty.ru/entries/3465785. The Russian text on that page is literally the one you asked about (and the book you were reading is apparently this one). While it sounds like something that Churchill could have said given the British WW2 history, all the citations have a newer date ...


3

The most all encompassing quote I can find is this: The newspaper report that about a fortnight ago my eldest son Harilal, now nearing fifty years, accepted Islam and that on Friday last 29th May in the midst of a large congregation in the Juma Masjid at Bombay he was permitted to announce his acceptance amid great acclamation and that after his speech ...


2

If Louis XIV did indeed say such a thing, what can we make of it? Actually, I could see where his statement makes a bit of sense. Under modern political theory there are multiple roles in government: Head of State, Head of Government, Commander in Chief, etc. Under a parlimentarty system, typically these may all be different people. However, for a true ...


2

Yes, I'm having trouble too locating it in the 1839 L'Organisation du travail. The earliest mention I've been able to find is from Louis Blanc 1851 brochure Plus de Girondins page 92: http://books.google.ca/books?id=KFc9AAAAcAAJ&pg=PA92 supported by the French Wikipedia ...


2

The quote is from the chapter on Demosthenes on Lives of the Ten Orators, by Pseudo-Plutarch: γενόμενος δὲ καὶ ἐν τῇ Ὀλυμπιακῇ πανηγύρει καὶ ἀκούσας Λαμάχου τοῦ Τερειναίου Φιλίππου καὶ Ἀλεξάνδρου ἐγκώμιον ἀναγινώσκοντος Θηβαίων δὲ καὶ Ὀλυνθίων κατατρέχοντος, παραναστὰς ἀρχαίων ποιητῶν μαρτυρίας προηνέγκατο περὶ τῶν Θηβαίοις καὶ Ὀλυνθίοις καλῶς ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible