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1

The idea originated with the memorialist Fran├žoise Bertaut de Motteville who only entered the French court after Richelieu had died, so she was reporting rumors she heard from people who knew Richelieu personally. In her memoirs published in 1723, she wrote the following in volume one: Laffemas avoit promis au Ministre qu'il le tourmenteroit si bien ...


0

Regardless of the authenticity of the quote, I can see two interpretations: I am so skilled in twisting words that I can make even the most innocent phrase look like treason Language is so ambiguous and prone to misinterpretation that it is possible to twist even the most innocent words to a reason for hanging I had a third interpretation. A ...


-1

He did not say it. The bon mot was well known in France and was originated by Voltaire in Chapter 24 of his book Siecle de Louis XIV which was published in 1751. According to Voltaire's account Louis XIV said this in a speech before the parliament on April 13, 1865, which would have been 85 years previously to when Voltaire wrote it. In the actual speech ...


5

Part of the problem here is that you have a garbled quote. This is from Botta's book on the Revolution which, believe it or not, was the primary source for many histories on the Revolution for over a hundred years, even though Botta was an Italian, it was written in Italian and the author had never even been to America. The book is actually pretty good, but ...



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