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Attitudes toward miscegenation were governed by two factors: 1) the degree of antagonism toward minorities and 2) the perceived "threat" posed by large minorities. The "North" (the former Union states) were the most tolerant to minorities. In the Northeast, the number of minorities was relatively large, but the degree of antagonism was small. In the ...


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Yes, public opinion matches up with anti-miscegenation laws, except for along the Pacific Coast. First, let's look at a map of anti-miscegenation laws: So the northeast and north midwest had no such laws in the entire 20th century. The West mostly had these laws during the mid-20th century, but repealed them before the Loving decision in 1967. The entire ...


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Yes. The perception in the Kennedy administration is that there was no alternative but to appoint pro-segregationist anti-civil rights district judges to most southern districts. Both Senators from the state in which a judge would serve must approve of the appointment before the full Senate even considers the appointment. Inevitably, then, district judges ...


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I will give this a shot and credit those who made comments on the OP. Starting with the dark-skinned boy in a yellow shirt, that one is obvious. This is an African, perhaps from Algeria (due to the beret and the beret's association with France). The two blond children to his right are indicative of the stereotypical American, an image we inherited from ...



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