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1

Some Roman gods ramaned the integral part of Medieval mythology and arts. For instance, consider the German legend of Tannhäuser (first attested at 1430), a knight who allegedly met Venus and fell in love with her. There are multiple appearances of other classical gods in medieval epos.


3

Greco-Roman polytheism in Rome survived the 455 CE sacking but it is unclear at what point traditional roman paganism transformed into hybrid Christian heresies versus any retention of religious purity. Secret cults by virtue of being secret are both hard to track and likely to mutate in isolation over time. In so far as Roman beliefs fed back into the ...


-3

We still do worship one last Roman god: Modern Cupid from today... and Cupid from Pompeii 2000 years ago The sole survivor of the Greco-Roman pantheon.


1

First, a caveat; religion isn't like Height or Eye Color - you can't measure it. And "religious leaders" don't have a position, they have a constellation of positions. Criteria #3 is, in my opinion, useless; any discussion of #3 is purely about opinion; there is no way to determine what an individual's metaphysical belief might be at any given moment. ...


1

Gustav I of Sweden switched from Catholicism to Protestantism. Initially it was a conflict over the arch bishop Gustav Trolle who Gustav exiled from Sweden as Trolle took sides for the king of Denmark and was regarded as a traitor to the Swedish people. At the Council of Västerås in 1527, the monarch was given the right to confiscate property donated to the ...


2

During post-Stalin time, it was kind of "moderate persecution": it was possible to visit church briefly "to look into architecture and paintings", but practicing openly was not good for the job carrier. On the contrary, belonging to the Communist party was very good for the carrier, and this was of course fully incompatible. Membership in Komsomol was also ...


4

In theory, yes that would cover any religion. In practice, not just no but hell no. Indian cultures, of which their religious beliefs were an integral part, were considered uncivilized and inferior. In the logic of time, this naturally meant the Indian "way of life" was an active harm to the Indians, as well as a standing threat to their neighbors. As such ...


0

The ONLY legal consequence of the establishment clause is that the federal government can't force people to adopt a specific religion. Nothing more, nothing less. Of course over time it's been corrupted to where many think it means the government is not allowed to allow any religion, to not allow any of its employees to be openly religious, but this is ...


3

Wikipedia does manage sometimes to serve up the silliest nonsense. As others have noted, Salem is in the English Bible. It is a transcription of one of the Hebrew names for Jerusalem. “Peter” is a Christian name (St Peter in the New Testament). No Muslim would ever be called “Peter Salem”: it is 100% Christian name. بطرس سالم is in fact a very typical Arab ...


4

Salem Poor and Peter Salem were both freed slaves born in Massachusetts (don't be so surprised, New England prohibitions against slavery weren't always followed), which explains the Salem in their names more than an Islamic background. The name Salem has a strong symbolic significance in colonial Massachusetts: In recognition of this peaceful transition ...


4

Certainly there are major religions in the East in ancient times that never believed in supreme creator/being. Two of these major religions still exist today. They are Buddhism and Jainism. The startling thing is they grew along side Hinduism in India which is a religion full of hundreds of gods! This was mainly because of sensible patronization from kings ...


7

It was basically a business decision. The Dutch West India Company had a large financial stake in the success of the colony, and ensuring that new settlers were treated with "moderation" was seen as necessary. The official response of The Dutch West India Company was the following letter signed by Abraham Wilmandone and David Von Baerle on April 16th, ...


4

I am considering this a reference request for seminal works on "power" in historiography. The most well known recent theorist of "power" as a historical determinant is Foucault. In Foucault's work power seems to be organised by a historical context of possibilities of knowledge, an "episteme," that orders how people perceive and enact power. I do not ...


4

I would think that the main reason for the decline of Christianity in North Africa since Roman Times was largely due to the rapid expansion of Islam in the first century of its existence. Arabs of the Rashidun and Umayyad Caliphates spread Islam at the point of the sword all the way across North Africa, up the Iberian Peninsula into France. The high water ...


1

If you compare the Christian presence in North Africa now to that from 100 years ago, there has been a noticeable decline. The main reason for this was anti-colonialist sentiment at the end of World War II. Of course, this was merely a continuation of a process of exclusion and elimination that has occurred over centuries. For example, in Algeria there have ...



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