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1

The idea that the Third Temple is necessary for the return of Christ appears to be related to Dispensationalism, which Wikipedia describes as a "Christian evangelical, futurist, Biblical interpretation". According to Wikipedia: Dispensationalists believe that the nation of Israel is distinct from the Christian Church,[2]:322 and that God has yet to ...


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Since Christianity believes that Christ is the Messiah that completes the Jewish prophecy, they also view the entire corpus of Old Testament history as part of Christian history - which is why it makes up half the Bible. As a major construction in the past built to specifications given by God, Solomon's temple is thus of historical interest to Christians. ...


3

Many people have good examples of the Mongols, Japan, and other Asian countries, but in the western world other examples come to mind. West Africa is a good example. In Western Africa the Merchants and rulers all converted to Islam, but the general population was still polytheistic. And everyone should note that The Islamic world was always tolerant of other ...


1

Another example in China are Confucianism (formally treated as religion), Taoism and Buddhism, and in particular, with regard to your question, the two last ones.


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Firstly let me say that this question was so nice I decided to do a bit of research into this and was done for the joy of knowing about rainbows. So let's see how people around the world thought about rainbows. The rainbow, a natural phenomenon noted for its beauty and mystical appearance, has been a favorite component of mythology throughout history. ...


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This question is answered on wikipedia: The rainbow, a natural phenomenon noted for its beauty and mystical appearance, has been a favorite component of mythology throughout history. Rainbows are part of the myths of many cultures around the world. The Norse saw it as Bifrost; Judeo-Christian traditions see it as a covenant with God not to destroy the ...


4

I believe the main difference is in how communications worked in the various societies. The Roman Empire was primarily built around the Mediterranean, and its trade routes were primarily via the sea. So what you see with the spread of Christianity is that it first popped up in the large port cities of the Empire. Particularly those that already had a Jewish ...


1

Let me start by saying that the linked video is full of holes. There is no sure-shot way of knowing when a religion began and how it spread across the globe. The only thing that can be known are the shared beliefs from the time. The spread of Hinduism wasn't nearly as uniformed as shown in the video. It grew at different paces throughout the country. Two ...


2

Because Christianity isn't a national religion. It wasn't similar to the case of the Arabs who were Muslim and they brought their religion as they conquered in one big wave. Europe was pagan and a few individual preachers travelled to cities with lots of people who would go to their lectures and the religious spread was initially centered around those ...


4

Mongols and any Christian territory ruled by them - such as Russia. While there was, of course, conflict (it was, after all, a war of conquest), it was NOT in any way, shape or form of a religious nature, but pure geopolitics. Mongols were explicitly, by design, very religiously tolerant and enforced that. Another example would be Armenia (which existed as ...


8

My general impression is that in most great empires of the past, where the population was mixed, most of the times religions coexisted peacefully, like in Persian empire, for example. Some other examples are: In Khazar khaghanate, Judaism, Islam and Christianity apparently peacefully coexisted with paganism and with each other. In the Roman republic (and ...


9

An exact example which adheres to your definition might be hard to find, but I got one which is quite close. In Japan, both Buddhism and Shintoism were practiced in parallel. Buddhism came to Japan in the 6th century. Buddhism focuses on the worship of a single entity, but calling it monotheistic might be kind of a stretch considering that Buddha never ...


11

There are several points to be considered in this question. Let us start by seeing some hard facts. As quoted by Wikipedia article SN1054: "Crab Nebula probably appeared in April or early May, rising to its maximum brightness of between apparent magnitude −7 and −4.5 (brighter than everything in the night sky except the Moon) by July. The supernova was ...


6

Brecher, K., R. A. Fesen, S. P. Maran, and J. C. Brandt. “Ancient Records and the Crab Nebula Supernova.” The Observatory 103 (June 1, 1983): 106–13. A more likely explanation for the lack of widespread European reports of the A.D. 1054 event was offered by Zaleman⁷ and by Thomas⁸, who ascribe it to the Great Schism, which split Christianity into the ...


2

Zoroastrianism had the concept of good-evil dualism with a Satan-like opposite of God (Ahriman) and hell/heaven concept where the souls of good people / bad people go accordingly. Jewish mysticism was most probably influenced by Zoroastrianism, and Christianity and Islam got it from the Jewish mysticism.



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