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0

You don't really expect us to regard a comic script as a serious historical source, do you?


1

This is kind of tough to answer, as few people look upon themselves as "evil", and there are adherents to pretty much every religion that will happily tell you everyone else is worshiping devils. That being said, the best candidate I can think of is the Thuggee (Thugs). Yes, we got the word from a historical people. This was a society in India that believed ...


0

Mark Weber claims he was baptized Catholic and attended Mass weekly on Sundays until circa 1920, when he didn't want to be seen in a Catholic church. Later on, his viewed changed into deism. Adolf Hitler believed that the root of Western Civilisation was Christianity. Although the Fuhrer did not believe in a personal God and was not himself a Marian ...


3

There were in fact several encounters between Fransiscan friars and Buddhists. Whether it resulted in transfer of "mysticism" can be questioned, but as with all religions, mixing and absorption of ideas is quite likely. Willem van Ruysbroeck, a Flemish Franciscan friar, spent six months in 1254 in Karakorum. In his "Itinirarium" he describes accurately ...


1

Check out this material http://legacy.owensboro.kctcs.edu/crunyon/e261c/06-Plato/greek_mystery_cults.htm The following has been taken from Will Durant, The Life of Greece, vol. 2 of The Story of Civilization, Simon and Schuster, 1966, 188-92. If the verdict was guilty, there would be severe punishment. One form of the doctrine conceived this ...


6

Yes, Puritans supported a state church. Participation in political life was dependent on one's religious background, as voting rights were restricted to members of the church. Note that "church membership" is even stricter than being a Puritan: one had to be a member of the "elect" who could testify to their personal experience of God. Furthermore, ...


2

There are some interesting answers here however none contesting the question itself. I would rather like to put a contradictory view on this. India, in fact, was mass converted by Islam and to a lesser extent by Christianity. I believe most of the answers here see India as it is present in the current form. However if you historically see, the entire ...


2

Some Roman gods ramaned the integral part of Medieval mythology and arts. For instance, consider the German legend of Tannhäuser (first attested at 1430), a knight who allegedly met Venus and fell in love with her. There are multiple appearances of other classical gods in medieval epos.


6

Greco-Roman polytheism in Rome survived the 455 CE sacking but it is unclear at what point traditional roman paganism transformed into hybrid Christian heresies versus any retention of religious purity. Secret cults by virtue of being secret are both hard to track and likely to mutate in isolation over time. In so far as Roman beliefs fed back into the ...


-3

We still do worship one last Roman god: Modern Cupid from today... and Cupid from Pompeii 2000 years ago The sole survivor of the Greco-Roman pantheon.


1

First, a caveat; religion isn't like Height or Eye Color - you can't measure it. And "religious leaders" don't have a position, they have a constellation of positions. Criteria #3 is, in my opinion, useless; any discussion of #3 is purely about opinion; there is no way to determine what an individual's metaphysical belief might be at any given moment. ...


1

Gustav I of Sweden switched from Catholicism to Protestantism. Initially it was a conflict over the arch bishop Gustav Trolle who Gustav exiled from Sweden as Trolle took sides for the king of Denmark and was regarded as a traitor to the Swedish people. At the Council of Västerås in 1527, the monarch was given the right to confiscate property donated to the ...


3

During post-Stalin time, it was kind of "moderate persecution": it was possible to visit church briefly "to look into architecture and paintings", but practicing openly was not good for the job carrier. On the contrary, belonging to the Communist party was very good for the carrier, and this was of course fully incompatible. Membership in Komsomol was also ...


5

In theory, yes that would cover any religion. In practice, not just no but hell no. Indian cultures, of which their religious beliefs were an integral part, were considered uncivilized and inferior. In the logic of time, this naturally meant the Indian "way of life" was an active harm to the Indians, as well as a standing threat to their neighbors. As such ...


0

The ONLY legal consequence of the establishment clause is that the federal government can't force people to adopt a specific religion. Nothing more, nothing less. Of course over time it's been corrupted to where many think it means the government is not allowed to allow any religion, to not allow any of its employees to be openly religious, but this is ...



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