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6

Anne's half-brother, James the Old Pretender would be her next of kin. He was the closest living relative; son to the deposed King James II & VII and sibling to Queen Mary II. However, it seems what you really want to know is who would succeed Anne to the throne of England. In that case, it would still be the heirs of Sophia the Electress of Hanover. ...


-1

I'm pretty sure the molten calf didn't have feathers either. My fault though I actually edited this post to add a U in molt, my mistake.


1

Nat Geo sponsored DNA tests and 3d scans of him and his father but refused to release the details, why? Anyway Nat Geo then produced an episode which showed scientists looking at the results on a monitor, experts around the world noted the results and though these were inconclusive gave evidence that he was European with the highest match in Ireland. which ...


0

Speaking for Europe: People in the past used to be very religious, almost all of them. And they (tried) to follow very strictly the Bible, what to do and what not to do. Since the Bible condemned homosexuality, it was a no go for all countries.


3

I would highly recommend this podcast for more information: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00txj8d Around the 24 minute mark, Pythia is discussed. The historian on the program says that some of the women who served as Pythia likely did speak gibberish, which provided a chance for "translation" into a well-composed answer (Plutarch's theory). However, she ...


-1

This subject is covered in detail in the Wikipedia on the Pythia. I have not read any ancient account that describes the Oracle as speaking "gibberish". They commonly speak of the Oracle giving hints and riddles, or saying mysterious or ambiguous things, not gibberish. The account of Strabo circa 10 B.C. reads as follows: They say that the seat of the ...


11

Probably not. Wikipedia's claim that the Pythia goes into a vapor frenzy and spoke gibberish is not so much a usual theory as it is a common misconception. According to Pierre Amandry, the idea of an ecstatic and unintelligible priestess was sparked by Plato in his Phaedrus, section 244. Amandry argued that early Christian writers adopted this image of ...


5

This is a bit of a tricky question. Before speaking of historical views of homosexuality, it is very important to understand what is being spoken about. Prior to the 20th century, there really was no concept of homosexuality as we understand it today. In the late 19th century, the concept of homosexuality as an actual orientation was first proposed and ...


-3

This isn't a comprehensive method but it's a really useful history tool. Google has a tool called Ngram viewer that allows you to search for the frequency of words used in books dating as far back as 1800. Here is a simple example: ...


1

(This answer isn't very historically rigorous, as I wrote it thinking I was on Worldbuilding.Stackexchange where citations and rigorous detailing aren't expected, but I think it is worthwhile here because it adds a different perspective which I would say is valid overall, and seems needed to me to relate the question to historical cosmologies instead of only ...


3

Technically speaking, aren't gods extraterrestrial too? Especially the ones that were supposed to create the earth, they must have come from somewhere. And they hang out in alternative planes (Asgard) or on top of stuff (Olympus). The ones with animal heads or multiple arms are pretty alien.


21

The main storyline to Lucian's Αληθή διηγήματα (2nd century CE) is the war between the people of the Sun and the people of the Moon over colonization of the Morning Star. As you can probably imagine from the satire's topic, several alien life forms are mentioned. Here's a quote describing the narrator's encounter with Endymion, King of the Moon: We ...


5

Cosmic pluralism (many inhabited worlds) is an idea which goes back to the Ancient Greeks. Also this is one of the beliefs that folk wisdom has that Giordarno Bruno was condemned and burned for (1600).


8

I believe Cyrano de Bergerac's Comical History of the States and Empires of the Moon and The States and Empires of the Sum, both published posthumously in 1657 and 1662 respectively, precede both Swift's Gulliver's Travels (published 1726, amended 1735) and Voltaire's Micromegas of 1752. Arthur C. Clarke credits Cyrano' books with: being the first ...


9

I would say, Voltaire, Micromegas (1752). It describes a creature from one of the planets orbiting Sirius, who visits Solar system, befriends some guy from Saturn, and they both visit Earth. Of course it is always difficult to prove that something was the first, so let someone give an earlier reference.


2

The Norse did not use symbols. They were primarily oral people that did not use writing. Writing was often seen in Norse culture as something for "wizards" or other evil beings. The vast majority of Norsemen during the viking period were completely illiterate. For a modern-day, literate person, the logical symbol for Loki would be mistletoe, a sprig of ...


2

Hi Islam is not banned in Greece. Muslim Greeks are however discriminated against. Evidence of Islamic rule is very evident in Northern Greece. There are dozens of operating mosques on use in Thrace. These citizens are unfortunately exploited by the secular Kemalist State of modern Turkey. The majority of Greek Muslims were expelled to Turkey after the ...


5

Technically, the Ecclesiastical Courts Act of 1813 (53. Geo. 3. c. 127) provided that: And be it further enacted, that no person who shall be so pronounced or declared excommunicate, shall incur any civil penalty or incapacity whatever, in consequence of such excommunication, save such imprisonment, not exceeding six months, as the court pronouncing or ...



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