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I would recommend a read through Janet Abu-Lughod's book, Before European Hegemony. This covers trade routes and practices in different areas of the world during the late 14th through early 16th centuries. The remainder of this answer is pulled in great part from what I understood of the book. Water ways are preferred due to a lower rate of banditry. While ...


6

Honestly I do not have the complete historic reference for this, but the Germans were one of the first groups of people to actually print manuals for fencing. Johannes Liechtenauer was a famous weapon master of the 14th century and most of the people that wrote the initial manuals claim to have trained with him. With the manuals of combat being written out ...


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I think the premise of the question may be arguable. Scientific progress happened everywhere - it's human nature to inquire and explore. Scientific progress is also a threat to those in power. We have seen this problem in Europe, too (see the Copernicus trial). So the real question shouldn't be why scientific exploration took place in Europe, but rather why ...


1

To break it down to the most simple form: book printing and the (re-)discovery of classical works (which were stored in large libraries and were being read by the odd monk from time to time). Furthermore, the Church had an iron grip on society for nearly a millenium, surpressing any attempts of enlightenment throughout the ages. It also had become a ...



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