Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

13

The question is poorly stated. The Founding Fathers were not all of one mind on many subjects— the Federalists saw danger in direct democracy, whereas the Anti-Federalists did not. Additionally, popular usage of terms like "democracy" or "republic" is quite different from a political scientist's use of such terms— indeed, quite a lot of things "don't mean ...


10

The word "caliph" comes from the Arabic "khalifa", which means "successor [of the Prophet]". The caliph claims a religion-based legitimacy, instead of popular support as in republics. The philosophy is totally different. A caliphate's objective is to have a government based on the Sharia, while a republic seeks to have a government based on popular will. ...


7

Ptolemy da Lucca (c. 1236 – c. 1327), also known as Bartholomew of Lucca, Tolomeo da Lucca, and Tolomeo Fiadoni is considered today an advocate of republicanism, mainly from his contributions to Thomas Aquinas' De Regimine Principum (On the Government of Rulers), which he completed after Auquinas death (1274). Ptolemy's main influences were Aristotle's ...


3

In short, because the means of power were dictated by democratic means. During the time of Oliver Cromwell's rule England was a commonwealth that can be considered a republic because the people were represented in the government by elected officials. After the defeat of Charles I in 1653 the victors drafted the Instrument of Government (full text here), and ...


2

@ChintaLaura's explanation is excellent - well researched and reasoned analysis of the question you asked. Your question however hints at a deeper interest in the function of government and various alternative mechanisms to fulfill that function. I think Fukayama's Origins of Political Order might provide a useful analytical framework. Loosely summarizing ...


1

Basically, a state is considered a republic if it has no king (or other type of monarch, i.e. duke, prince, count, atabeg, whatever). That's of course a narrow legalistic definition but that's the definition. As Drux has pointed out, there is no formal reason that the son of a ruler should succeed him, it just "happens", unlike in a monarchy where the line ...


1

In ancient world many peoples employed the idea of collective government. In most tribes there was a tribe's council which usually elected the military commander (whom we would call "king" or "prince"). Sometimes a tribe was divided into several genses which had their own leadership so in the tribal council only the leadership of the genses participated. ...


1

During the early days of the Republic, the franchise was only limited to members of certain families (aka: Patricians). This made their "Republic" very hard to discern from your typical ancient big-city Oligarchy, except that the size of their voting body was a bit bigger than is typical (in the three digits rather than two). The fact that the franchise was ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible