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The Glorious Revolution in the UK where Mary II (although mostly by her husband William of Orange, later William III) deposed her brother, James II & VII. I'm not entirely sure if it fulfils your criteria, there was not much more than a skirmish during the actual revolution, but it did result in the Jacobite uprising in Scotland and the Williamite war ...


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In 1822, Dom Pedro I led a revolution of Brazil against its mother country, Portugal, that was (nominally) headed by his father.


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Louis Philippe II the Duke of Orléans, who avidly supported the French Revolution - arguably, the quintessential revolution of the modern era. As First Prince of the Blood, he was one of the most senior members of the ruling Bourbon dynasty. In fact his son would assume the French throne in 1830. I think he qualifies both as a royal and member of the high ...


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The turning point was not the French revolution but American revolution which happened 13 years earlier. The Declaration of Independence (1776) is the first official political document where these rights (for all) are mentioned. The idea should probably be credited to French philosophers of 1700s. Human rights (in the sense of the rights of ALL humans) ...


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In a rather simplistic answer, because of bourgeoisie. The French Revolution was a commons revolt, but we need to remember that not all "commons" where poor. Bourgeois where commons, in the third estate. As they are rich, they are stronger political and ideological players that could patronage thinkers ans artists that supports the overthrow of society based ...



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