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1

Some people said that wine is not grown in Britain but I have read of contemporary British wine growing. the climate of Britain was warmer during the Roman Era than in some later eras, and there is evidence of wine growing in Britain in the Roman era and in the medieval era. Lord Bute grew grapes and made wine at his castle in Cardiff, Wales, about 1900. ...


1

This looks more than a coincidence than anything else. Romans did conquer lands which could not grow wine, e.g. the British Isles: the climate of Atlantic-facing areas of Europe is reputed to have been somewhat warmer than usual in Roman times, but this does not mean that winegrowing was actually possible, let alone done by Roman colonists. In fact, ...


1

There are several answers to that question; various authors have favoured one or another, but it is probable that the fall of the Western Roman Empire was due to their combination. From a geostrategic point of view, the stability of the Roman Empire was guaranteed by the legions: strong but not numerous forces, able to intervene in many places thanks to ...


9

Romans weren't very concerned about unique names for just about anyone. In the Late Republic, Fathers, sons, grandsons had about three between them per family. All girls were just named after the family with a feminine ending. i.e. Julia --> "Julian Girl". In the case of Vespasian's family, the second son had the name Domitianus added to the standard ...


6

Tiberius and Nero are also known by their respective praenomen. So it is not without parallel.


1

The main impediment for a nation like the Persians is the relative lack of a standing army. The Persians were a feudal state. In order to go to war "big time" with the Romans, the King of Kings would have to convince his district "kings" to send contingents to join his own household troops. If the KofK's was a weak one, nobody would show up and the Romans ...


7

Ballistae and other ancient pieces of "artillery" are siege engines. Their primary purpose is to provide fire support within the context of laying siege to a town or fortress; the heavy bolts could lay waste to wooden fortifications (especially the kind of light mobile protection against archers). Siege weapons are heavy, very slow to move, and have a low ...


4

I don't think Caesar was a hippie, but like a lot of young folk in history, did do things in dress and deportment to annoy the older generations. A Companion to Julius Caesar (Google Books Link) summarizes a lot of the various controversies over Caesar and his tunic. The ultimate sources are Suetonius, Lives of the 12 Caesars and several cracks by Cicero ...


1

The gold of Tolosa was a treasure in a lake where the celts offered many of their warprizes. However, in 105 BC, the proconsul of Cisalpine Gaul, Quintus Servilius Caepio, reported the discovery of the gold at Tolosa to the Senate, and was charged with sending the treasure back to Rome. Over 50,000 15 lb. bars of gold and 10,000 15 lb. bars of silver ...


1

The answer to your question is that these respective quantities are not known. Modern post-colonial historians routinely speak of how Britain, France, Belgium and other colonial powers looted their colonies by extracting their mineral resources. From this perspective the border between "looting" and "mining" does actually become rather fluid.


4

I'll only provide some data about the mined gold: 9 t p.a. "Production in Asturia, Callaecia, and Lusitania (all Iberian Peninsula) alone." (Pliny: Naturalis Historia, 33.21.78, in: Wilson 2002, p. 27) 190t during whole "Roman Time" in Northwest Spain (I didn't see a specific time range in the paper) ...



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