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45

Because Russia had been at war with Britain for most of the preceding two decades. One of Russia's problems in owning Alaska was defending it against it being used as a British route to invade Russia (militarily insane - but that's politics) - remember Canada was British at the time. By selling it to America they installed one of Britain's adversaries in ...


22

First of all, aircraft carriers are expensive. Russia (compared to USA) was never resource-rich enough to be able to afford the expense; neither was USSR. Second of all, Russia (or rather USSR) had no motivation. USA's main geopolitical goal is to safeguard seabourne trade routes; and to prevent strong competitors from arising and commanding great sets of ...


20

Yes. Originally, Moscow became a center of power as a defensive measure against Mongols, since it was seen as a "remote, forested location" for the descendants of Kievan Rus. One Wikipedia article says that "a number of rivers provided access to the Baltic and Black Seas and to the Caucasus region", but it seems to me it is in the Volga basin, so the best ...


20

Existence The existence of a Southern Land was postulated by the Greeks, on grounds of symmetry. Aristotle (Meterologica, II, 5) writes: Now since there must be a region bearing the same relation to the southern pole as the place we live in bears to our pole, it will clearly correspond in the ordering of its winds as well as in other things. So just as ...


13

The first one says USSR (right below the star) The Union of Soviet Socialist Republics is a socialist state of workers and peasants See http://www.departments.bucknell.edu/russian/const/36cons01.html (constitution of the USSR), Article 1. The second one says "VKP(b)" in the top-right corner meaning All-Russian Communist Party (bolsheviks) or All-Union ...


13

Let's split this into two questions. First, is it plausible that a population of Russian emigrants from the White émigré population would sing this Soviet song. And second, was it the intention of the film makers to portray the Russian emigrants as influenced by Soviet culture. According to Wikipedia, Russian Americans came to America in four waves: the ...


12

Russia and America (the Union) were very nearly allies during the Civil War. The implied enemies were the South (Confederacy) and Great Britain. Although Russia wanted to "monetize" Alaska, she also wanted it in "friendly" hands. The (re-united) U.S. fit the bill. Great Britain did not, after having allied with France and Turkey in the Crimean war.


12

It wasn't as simple as "13 against 4" as the question states. Russians only had 8 real battleships. 3 were coastal defense Ushakov class battleships. The entire order of battle was significantly less lopsided than the ratio above indicates. Even leaving aside ship quality, the quantity was (from Wiki) | Japan | Russia | ...


11

It's a bit of a long write-up, but the best reason is fairly easy to trace on a map. The southern border of Russia between Caspian and Black seas is pretty defenseless as far as natural features (same is true for other borders). So historically, Russia worked/fought to extend its borders to defensible ranges, in case of this specific area, the Greater ...


11

The Russo-American Treaty of 1824 established a clear border between American and Russian lands on the West Coast as well as trade. It gave Russian claims south of parallel 54°40′ north to the US. Russia was inclined to give away this territory, which was in dispute between them, Britain, America and Spain, to insure their undisputed and ongoing ownership ...


11

Japan agreed to pay war reparations of 1.3 trillion yen. The Japanese GDP in 1952 was 6,217 billion yen. So the reparation was 20.91% of the Japanese GDP. The Japanese GDP in 2011 was equivalent to $5.869 trillion 2011 USD. So the reparations were equivalent to 1,224 billion 2011 USD. This was all proposed at the Treaty of San Francisco in 1952. The soviet ...


10

There was a serious drop in GDP. The following graphic shows drop in GDP per captia for Russian Federation (not the USSR): Passengers transported by civil air transport (RSFSR compared to Russia): Passengers transported by intercity rail transport: There was also a serious drop in demographic indicators. The following plot shows birth rate (red), ...


9

This is an interesting question. With the benefit of hindsight, "Russia" wasn't in a position to help Saddam Hussein in 1990-91 because the Soviet was about to implode. The reason it probably didn't help Hussein in 2003 was that they didn't believe that President George Bush Jr. would invade Iraq; his father, Bush Sr., had declined to march on Baghdad ...


9

The “bela” stems from the common Slavic root for “white”, as has been discussed in the other answers. There were also historical regions called the “Red” and the “Black” Rus’ (Ruthenia) on the territory of todays Belarus and Ukraine-- the Grand Duchy of Lithuania of the middle ages. The origin of the “Rus” part of Belarus is somewhat uncertain. It is first ...


8

The USSR was created in 1922 so the first one for sure cannot be from 1918. The cited first article of the constitution belongs to the constitution of 1936. The image clearly attributes it to the constitution (by small font below the phrase it says "from the constitution of the Soviet Union" and the entire phrase is in the quotes. So my guess is that the ...


8

To complement kubanczyk's excellent answer: Moscow's rise to power was the result of a masterful political play by their rulers jockeying for power/position in front of the Horde (e.g. Mongols). It was cemented when Moscow's Dmitry Donskoj and his army was the main force behind the first battle where Russians defeated Mongols (Kulikovo Field battle). As ...


8

Belarus was earlier called White Russia. Belo is the "Russian" word for White. It is probably not a reference to the Latin "bella" or beautiful. Nor do I believe that "Rus" is a reference to a woman. "Rus" was a reference to a group of Vikings who settled the western parts of what later became the Soviet Union, including modern Belarus and the Ukraine. ...


8

The Review Article, Antony Kalashnikov (2012) "Differing Interpretations: Causes of the Collapse of the Soviet Union" Constellations: "there is a correlation between mediums of writing and the "factor of collapse" they tend to espouse." "that the historiography is best classified by "factors for collapse", and that these are: economic, nationalities, ...


8

Vienna was besieged in 1683. In the Treaty of Bakhchisarai, Russia agreed not to fight Ottoman Empire for the time between 1681 and 1701, and actually kept the promise... until 1686 that is. Then it joined the European coalition and started Russo-Turkish War (1686–1700), which it won, gaining Azov and Taganrog. Both were lost soon in 1711, Azov re-taken by ...


7

In my reading of Lenin, he very rarely criticizes Marx. He is much more interested in developing the dialectical concepts of Marx (ie. Speaking to the development of capitalism, the worker's struggle , and the tactics of the of socialist movements. ). That said , his major theoretical developments was to challenge the overly mechanical interpretation of ...


7

First note that besides Chechnya there are some related and similar peoples in the North Caucasus: Ingushs, Dagestan peoples, Adygh people, Circassians etc. That is Chechnya is only a part of greater North Caucasus community. The ancient lifestyle of most of these people, and especially, of Chechens was making raids on neighboring settlements, capturing ...


7

I think everyone who has posted here (@ihtkwot, @mgb, @Russell) have all brought up important points. I agree with @ihtkwot and @Russell that Russia simply did not have the military capacity to challenge Britain's hold on India (a territory that the British would have vigorously defended). Also, Russia seemed far more interested in territories to the west ...


7

I think Stalin is quite popular in Russia. It would be quite surprising if Stalin was not that popular. The popularity of Stalin today may be even greater than it was in 1970s and 1980s. There are multiple reasons. First of all, Stalin is credited for winning the Great Patriotic War, the most bloody war in human history and the history of Russia. Many ...


7

Russia was the ally of the socialist Baath party in Iraq, of which Saddam was a member. However, the Iran-Iraq war changed this allegiance. Since during the cold-war there were really only two poles (in military, economic, and ideological power), most countries allied with one or the other. This ultimately became a binary decision, as allying with one ...


7

The Dardanelles campaign was as much about resupplying Russia as knocking the Ottoman Empire out of the war by taking the capital, Istanbul. It's also easy to say in retrospect that not enough soldiers and ships were sent to that theatre, but at the time the commanders evidently thought they had enough. Calling the effort "half-baked" only makes sense with ...


7

The Khazar's have no known descendents. Their language is dead, with no successor languages. It is currently considered to have been Turkic, of the Oghur branch. The only remaining living language of that branch is Chuvash in Central Russia, but those would at best be descendents of sort of cousins of the Khazars (the Bulgars). There have been lots of ...


7

Interesting question and highly creative conjectures but ultimately the answer is no. The trade routes didn't play much of a role: Russian trade remained oriented on Western Europe; as for the great Russian music, it was the product of the 19-20th centuries and followed and developed, once again, Western patterns. So, to sum up: I can't think of any ...


7

Poland was already by the Seven Years War a joint protectorate of Russia, Prussia, and Austria [edit] as well as France and Turkey. In a war amongst these three powers, and given the liberum veto which allowed any member of its Diet to nullify the proceedings of the whole, it was unable to have any bearing on the course of the war: (The Cambridge History of ...


7

There have been several travels in boats reconstructed from the relevant times. One that I can find good records of is the boat known is Aifur. It travelled in 1994 from Sigtuna in Sweden to Novgorod. This took 41 days. In 1994, the Aifur crossed the Baltic Sea and sailed up the rivers Neva and Volkhov to Novgorod. Distance covered was 1382 km. The ...


7

On October, 20-21 1941, the German occupation authority of Borisov (headed by Stanislav Stankevich with the participation of obersturmfuerer Kraffe) performed liquidation of the Jewish ghetto. At the day were killed 7 245 Jews. The upcoming action was announced on a banquet by the city administration. The performers were mostly Russian auxiliary police ...



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