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First, I would say that Lithuania was less colonized by the Soviet Union, meaning that we are only making a comparison with the other two. First, Lithuania is less accessible than the other two. It has less coastline than Latvia, and much less coastline than Estonia (before World war II, most of the Soviet Baltic fleet was stationed at Talinn). Also, ...


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As the other answer and comments pointed out, all three Baltic states fought to resist the Soviet re-occupation after 1944. The Lithuanian effort were relatively more determined, costing the Lithuania about as many lives as the rest of the Baltic resistances. More importantly, however, during this period Lithuania was slower in its economic development ...


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Lithuanian resistance was very determined, well-organized, and violent, and it persisted for almost a decade after re-occupation by Soviet Union in 1944. The "forest people" were hiding in the forests, gather info from largely pro-resistance population, and assassinate pro-Soviet functionaries of any level up to 1953. Some of the assassinations were based ...


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1932 There are two chief interpretations of the 1932 Soviet famine, or especially the more infamous Ukrainian component, the Holodomor. That the famine was at least partially caused or exacerbated by Soviet policies is well established. The main difference between the schools of thought is the degree to which Soviet authorities perpetuated or even ...


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In general, yes, sort of. First of all there are two main divisions of Russians, the Bolshoi Russky (great Russians) and the little Russians. Then beyond this there were innumerable so-called "Slavic" tribes (Pechenegs, etc etc etc). It is important to realize that the "Slavic" peoples have widely varying ethnicities and it is only language similarities that ...


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There are two ways to answer this question, the easy way and the hard way. The easy way is to use language as an indication of lineage. Language is probably the foremost component of a culture, so this is a valid and typical approach. The language Russians use ("Russian") is Slavic, while the language the Varangians used was Germanic. Historically it ...


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Yes, there was a definite city/folk divide in European musical cultures. City dwellers, especially the more educated, listened to classical music. A conscious "back to the country" movement developed within classical musical culture. It is perhaps best known through Brahms' Hungarian Dances and then Dvorak's Slavonic Dances, which together had been written ...



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