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15

Saladin was an unusual man who tried to win the "hearts and minds" of people he conquered. When he occupied Jerusalem, he ordered his men NOT to kill and plunder (in contrast even to the crusaders). When he occupied Cairo, Egypt, he built hospitals and universities for the city, even though he had to take harsh measures against the leaders of his former ...


12

Can we think of any reason why a major American Holywood motion picture would wish to distance it's hero from Islam? Most of his portrayal in 'literature' is from Walter Scott and the Victorians which tells you a lot more about their attitudes to themselves and what they saw as important values than it does about an actual medieval Islamic ruler


11

Saladin abided by a code of chivalry, for which he was renowned among Muslims and Christians alike. While in the short run this could sometimes look unwise (as in your example), in the long run this insistence on warrior ethics was very beneficial for Saladin who acquid a reputation of a just ruler. This meant for instance that his enemies could surrender to ...


8

Saladin was actually at war with the Almohads. The latter were probably pleased to see the crusaders arrive on the scene. There is a good article on this by A. Baadj in "Al-Qaná¹­ara", 2013, pp. 276-295. A pdf is available on "Google Scholar".


6

At this point in history the Northern European galleys were much faster and seaworthy than anything the Arabs were building. Also, in arms the Northern Europeans had caught up with the Arabs, and exceeded them by far in the quality of shields and armor. Richard's knights were fully armored in steel while the typical Spanish arab was wearing cloth robes and a ...


6

The groundwork that allowed the use of the strait by the crusaders began much earlier than 1190, and has as much to do with other political and military developments around the Iberian peninsula than anything else. The Almohadin fleet had been for centuries a dominant force in the region, and has essentially controlled access to the Mediterranean for 400 ...


2

Assuming this truly did happen, there are a couple of reasons that might explain why. First of all, Saladin was Muslim, and one of the of the main principles of Islam is that Muslims should help those in need. Secondly, Saladin could use this as an opportunity to send men into Richard's camp and report back on the condition and size of Richard's army, ...


1

Excellent article explaining the timeline, each crusade and the complex relationship between Saladin and the Berberic Empire: The crusades were a series of holy wars called by popes with the promise of indulgences for those who fought in them and directed against external and internal enemies of Christendom for the recovery of Christian property or in ...



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