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17

The Colonel was of Scottish descent and served with the King's Own Scottish Borderers in WW I (according to Wikipedia). The trouser pattern in question could well exhibit the unit's (mainly green-and-blue) tartan. Also, the cape he wears appears very similar to those exhibited at the King's Own Scottish Borderers Regimental Museum's web site. And as for him ...


12

The first attempt at unification was sparked by succession disputes, after Margaret of Scotland died in 1290. This lead to a series of conflicts, spanning from 1296 to 1357, known today as the Wars of Scottish Independence. Scotland retained its status as an independent nation after the end of the wars. The claim of Mary, Queen of Scots to the English ...


10

Like most battles, the results of those at Falkirk and Bannockburn depended on the fortunes and momentum of war. At Falkirk, for instance, the initial English cavalry charge didn't do much against the schiltrons (circles) of spearmen, but it slaughtered Scots archers placed wrongly between (instead of inside) the schiltrons. Thus, the Welch archers, which ...


9

To an extent the answer depends on what you mean by 'medieval times'. The answer in 800 is very different from 1400. However, I'll have a go for the later medieval period, post Normanisation around 1100 until 1500. The idea that Scotland in the late medieval period operated under some sort of 'clan system' is not true. 'Clan' is really just another name for ...


7

It seems most likely to me it would have been a local Sept leader, or at best a Earl or Laird, who got run out of his territories in the course of typical Scottish infighting. Over generations of retelling this guy could easily have been eventually promoted all the way to a "King", as it makes the family's origins sound more respectable. You would be ...


7

I am fairly sure this is Mary's cipher (here are similar specimen). It's a fairly simple encryption scheme and was indeed broken by her contemporary enemies in the 16th century.


5

The confusion is due to the difference between the Links - the sandy, grassy areas unsuitable for crops or buildings near the coast - and the course - the actual arrangement of tees, holes and traps. While the Links at St. Andrews has been home to golf for longer, the actual course is newer - in the early 19th Century, the links had to accomodate rabbit ...


4

I've found these numbers for the total population counts at the beginning and end of this period. 1600 - 800,000 (some sources state up to 1,000,000) 1900 - 4,437,000 Now we need to factor in immigration and emigration to get the natural population change. This is very difficult because few records were kept until the turn of the nineteenth century. ...


4

The Library of Congress website has archived a great amount of letters, experimental notes, and general notebooks of Graham Bell. There, using the right search terms, I came up with a whole list of articles related to the tetrahedral kite. Other notes of Graham Bell are available as well, but I haven't researched those.


3

Well, the obvious conclusion would be that this is a reference to the historical fact that the lowlands tended to have a lot more non-Gaelic speakers living in them. Of course, place names can be tricky, so it isn't always wise to go with the obvious. They tend to be very "conservative", in that they can be the oldest words in use in a language, or even ...


3

Not all Scots ran around in kilts - that is very much a Highland tradition. The KOSB being borderers and lowlanders in general did not see the kilt as part of their own tradition, and thus Tartan Trews were worn - and looked very sharp if I may say so. The pipers of the regiment did wear the Royal Stewart in a Kilt, bit other ranks wore Leslie Tartan Trews ...


3

To answer the question here are some extracts from specified sources: Scottish Historical Documents, by Professor Gordon Donaldson (p. 266, ISBN 1-897784-41-4): England retaliated in 1705 with the Alien Act, which declared that, until Scotland accepted the Hanoverian succession, all Scots would be treated as aliens in England and the import of cattle, ...


3

Note just bowmen... The quality of archers, their training, and their equipment did vary. Inexperienced bowmen would be of very little use on the battle field and could even be a hindrance to the side employing them -- friendly "fire" really is not. Bows, as anything made of wood, is sensitive to the weather. Scotland is well known for their rains, cold ...


2

A simple answer is because of the lines of inheritance. In the 16th century, there was a rivalry between two queens, Mary Queen of Scots, and Queen Elizabeth I, who each wanted the throne of the other, and who were cousins. Mary Queen of Scots fled to England after being overthrown in her own country, and was imprisoned for nearly 20 years, before being ...


2

Ă“engus Olmucaid was a high king of Ireland who also conquered and ruled Scotland in approximately 1000 BC. Around the time of Jesus there was a large emmigration to Albion (Western Scotland) at which time the kingdom of the Dal Riata was firmly established. Later Scottish rulers invariably descend at least in part from this kingdom, the Kings of the Dal ...


1

The King's Own Scottish Borderers (formed in Edinburgh in 1689) were a Lowland Scots regiment one of the original truly Scottish regiments formed before the union of Scotland with England (unlike the much younger and junior Highland regiments who were never part of the Scottish establishment) and as such wore trews instead of kilts.



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