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9

The biggest issue in deciphering the Indus script is that the average length of the known inscriptions is less than five signs, with the longest one containing only 17 non repeating signs: The longest Indus 'inscription' (if that's the right word) on a single flat surface is M-314, which contains 17 non-repeating symbols. Like all but one Indus '...


5

The manuscript letters are I and h making the word Ihs. ΙΗΣ is the Greek contraction for Jesus. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christogram


4

Yes, though their uses tend to be sporadic and/or inconsistent. Ancient Chinese texts also used ▄ as both a full-stop and a comma, or a - for pauses. However, there's a great deal of variation and inconsistency. Often they are omitted and readers are expected to work it out from context, or sentence structures especially if the document is written with a ...


4

There is a gap of fifteen centuries between the demise of Indus script, and the origin of Brahmi script. More, Indus Valley script remains undeciphered despite the corpus of literature written in Brahmi script. On the other hand, there are substantial and irreconcilable differences between Kharosthi, which was based on Aramaic, and Brahmi. The most current ...


3

So others know what is being talked about I am inserting a picture of the versal (ie the ornate capital letter): The transcription is as follows: Ihs autem dixitei egosum et vi debitis filium hominis seden tem adextris virtutas et venientem cu mnubibus caeli. It is from the 26th Chapter of Matthew and says: Jesus however said to them "I am" and ...


2

There is no such thing as "Ostian script". Ostia is known for having been the source of a relatively large number of well-preserved Latin inscriptions (one is shown below). These inscriptions show the same variety of different Latin letters found at Rome itself and in other places within the Roman Empire. Latin inscriptions vary, as one might expect, because ...


2

Ostia was a Roman port, possibly the first of their colonies. As such, the script should have been based on the Latin alphabet, which itself appears to have been derived from the Etruscan script. Looking at graffiti found in the ruins there was a fair amount of variability in writing of Latin characters.



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