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16

Yes, there are quite a few. The very first was in 1688, when Quakers in Germantown, Pennsylvania wrote a two-page condemnation of the practice and sent it to the governing bodies of their Quaker church. The Society for the Relief of Free Negroes Unlawfully Held in Bondage was the first American abolition society; it was formed in 1775, primarily by ...


14

Maybe your source was National Geographics. However, it completely fails at explaining where this theory comes from and which facts speak in its favor (it prefers to present it as a fact). This BBC article does only a marginally better job, it lists some evidence but one is bound to ask whether a different interpretation of the same evidence wouldn't have ...


14

I believe this is referring to the gag rule (aka: Pickney Resolution 3) of the US House, adopted in 1836. It read: Resolved, That all petitions, memorials, resolutions, propositions, or papers, relating in any way or to any extent whatever to the subject of slavery, or the abolition of slavery, shall, without being either printed or referred, be ...


12

As I've understood it, selling entire tribes or large parts of it was already an ancient use. This was useful to the victors for money, as well as power and the guarantee that the particular tribe wouldn't attack them in the near future. Furthermore, slave trade deep into Africa was also in use by the Arabs, who, like the Europeans did at first, bought the ...


11

It is incorrect to perceive that there was a single concept of slavery in ancient world. The Latin word for slave, "servus" at the same time meant a servant. The concept of slavery differed very much between ancient societies and also differed in time. Sometimes a slave would be considered a member of the family to the extent that a formal kinly ...


10

According to The Dawn of European Civilization by G. Hartwell Jones (1903), slaves in Rome were "looked upon as fit for nothing but the cross, the stake, or the arena" [for gladiatorial combat]. In Rome, the "principle that the slave was destitute of legal rights" applied. Improvements in their status were slow to come. The position of the home-born ...


10

As @Luke states, there seems to have been a tipping point in the 19th century; I'd have dated it a few years earlier, and I'd have located it in England; Britain started out as a major participant in the slave trade (more slaves went to British possessions in the Caribbean than to the US colonies). Sometime between 1780's and 1830's there was a major shift ...


10

I'm not into proscribing a lot of collective guilt onto modern peoples for acts of their cultural ancestors. In fact, its damn silly. However, if someone else is trying to do this publicly, they should be really careful, because when it comes to slavery almost no culture on earth has clean hands. This includes Muslim society, and local Negro1 cultures. ...


10

This answer is for a previous version of the question The most persuasive answer to this that I have read recently can be found in "American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America" by Colin Woodard. It has been a few years since I read it, but if I remember correctly, he posits that different cultural patterns that were ...


9

Various Middle Eastern countries (e.g. Omani Empire which had the eastern coast of Africa) participated in the East African Slave Trade (a.k.a. Arab Slave Trade).


9

Most African slaves were sent to the Americas — basically a new world with large industrial-scale labor-intensive agriculture. There isn't much point in taking slaves to Europe to replace serfs or cheap farm laborers on small farms. Destinations of slaves Africa→Americas Portuguese America (modern Brazil) 38.5% British America ...


7

First, Haiti achieved independence in 1804, way before the US Civil-War. Haiti was originally called Saint-Domingue Wikipedia says that name was originally "Ayiti" as derived from Taíno and African languages At the end of the double battle for emancipation and independence, former slaves proclaimed the independence of Saint-Domingue on 1 January ...


7

Liberia is near the Ivory Coast and the Gold Coast (Ghana) that was the center of the slave trade. But it was a piece of relatively uninhabited land near the other two. "Freed" slaves came from two sources. 1) Slaves that were freed in the United States and sent to Liberia, and 2) Slaves that were "intercepted" and freed coming from the Ivory and Gold ...


7

The answer to the current question in the title, "Did people in antebellum Asheville N.C. own slaves?" would seem to be a clear yes. This is actually a remarkably topical question since Buncombe County (of which Asheville is the county seat) "has apparently become the first county in the country to digitize its original slave records" and put them online. ...


6

The material aspects of life for slaves at Mount Vernon--things like their quarters, clothing, food--were very similar to the way things were done on other large plantations in 18th century Virginia (places like Monticello or Sabine Hall). In the case of infants, mothers at Mount Vernon were given a new blanket at the time of the birth and baby clothes of ...


6

For a slave-owner if he felt sympathy to his slaves it was natural to improve their conditions and not to abuse them. Freeing the slaves was also very widespread, because it became a powerful means of political manipulation: a rich slave-owner would free a mass of slaves before an election so that they could vote for him. This led to a state prohibition of ...


6

Not all rowers were slaves, free men would be unlikely to be chained to their oars. Galley slavery was the harshest form of slavery a man could face, apart from maybe some mines, and could thus have been a form of punishment for those guilty of serious crimes just short of warranting execution (though I'd guess many would wish they were executed after some ...


6

There is a text of Cicero in which he defends a friend of his, named Milo. Milo was on trial for the murder of P. Clodius Pulcher, but manumitted (freed) all his slaves in advance. Roman slaves where required to be tortured for evidence against their master, hence freeing them will make this impossible. (Cicero, Speech in Defense of Milo 57, 58). I don't ...


5

Read the journals of David Livingstone, Henry Stanley, Meriwether Lewis, William Clark, Olaudah Equiano, Quobna Ottobah, Ignatius Sancho.... You will learn more about slavery and what the world was like a few hundred years ago from these journals than from second hand historical accounts. Slavery has no color or nation. From early times, small tribes beat up ...


5

There are two ways to go about effecting such a change; peacefully at the ballot box (like England did) or at the point of a weapon (like Haiti did). The English Model: The problem with outlawing slavery (or really anything nationwide) in the USA before the Civil War, is that before the war it wasn't really The United States of America, but rather The ...


5

No. Slavery was banned in the first 1820 constitution and this ban was explicitly re-enforced in the 1847 constitution when Liberia declared independence. If Liberians owned slaves within Liberia they did so without any legal recourse and the strong risk of losing their property.


5

It seems the key word I should've been looking for is "Christian Slavery". E.g. this NYT article says: Southern Christians believed that the Bible imposed on masters a host of obligations to their slaves. Most fundamentally, masters were to view slaves as fully members of their own households and as fellow brothers and sisters in the Lord. Therefore, as ...


4

It's difficult to give a proper answer, as the situation of slaves was different among various states and the same with different parts of Russia. So some particular conditions of Russian serfs can be similar speaking of one state, while can be a difference if to compare it with another state. In the matters of economy and law there were quite many ...


4

Nice question, but you've got the premise a bit wrong. Roman slaves could not be called by their master's name, not ever. But freedmen were, as a matter of law/custom. This applied to all cases, and wasn't the whim or fancy of a particular nobleman. Of course to differentiate, the slave would append his old, "barbarian" name as a cognomen. So if one Marcus ...


4

As surprising as this may seem, there is some truth in these allegations, but of course this does not change in any way their antisemitic character. Why there is some truth The French Triangular Trade was conducted primarily from the harbor of Nantes, from where departed almost as many slave-carrying ships as from all the other French harbors combined. ...


4

No Slavery is an incredibly broad topic, with different cultures and different times practicing different forms of slavery. It also isn't a topic in which I consider myself an expert. So I'll offer a very broad brush response. definition of terms "economically effective" - I'm going to interpret this phrase to mean that a system is more economically ...


3

After Franklin suggested that no serf ever realized the potential of improving their conditions and the right to education, I'd like to introduce a story of Aleksandr Nikitenko, who went to school being a serf and later, as a free man, became a professor at St. Petersburg University. He was emancipated by his owner in 1824, at the age of 20. In 1824, ...


3

For Athens wikipedia deals with the question in detail: Contrary to popular perception, in the ancient navies, crews were composed not of galley slaves but of free men. In the Athenian case in particular, service in the ships was the integral part of the military service provided by the lower classes, the thētai, although metics and hired ...


3

According to this link, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_North_Carolina, soemthing like one-third of the pre war population in North Carolina consisted of African slaves. But they were concentrated in the eastern, lowland, part of the state, where cash crops such as cotton, tobacco, and indigo were grown. Slaves and African Americans generally, were ...


3

Perhaps the earliest attempt to free Negro slaves (at least within their jurisdiction) was by the Quakers of Pennsylvania, late in the eighteenth century. "Abolistonist" reformers picked up the pace early in the nineteenth century. Perhaps the most famous of them was William Lloyd Garrison, whose first issue of the Liberator in 1831 opened, "I will be as ...



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