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5

This is quite reminiscent of the Ottoman Empire's original Janissaries. At first these were young boys forcibly taken from Christian families as slaves and raised to be the Sultan's personal guard. Not being from Muslim families they could legally be enslaved, and they had no social position in the Empire apart from their relationship to the Sultan. So not ...


3

The thing that seems to have been glassed over here is that the Vettii brothers were Freedmen themselves.The following is from the MIT source mentioned above: The very fact that these two brothers were able to rise from the status of slaves to wealthy merchants speaks to the social mobility within their society. It is theorized that the Vettii ...


3

It appears that the sentence: Commerce between master and slave is despotism. Is an abridgement of something that Jefferson did write: The whole commerce between master and slave is a perpetual exercise of the most boisterous passions, the most unremitting despotism on the one part, and degrading submissions on the other. Our children see this, and ...


1

The official story is that the inscription is taken from Jefferson’s Notes on the State of Virginia, with the last two sentences being from a letter to George Washington. A manuscript. The quote isn't some black-and-white assertion against slavery. Thomas Jefferson had complex and evolving relationships with slaves. He owned lots of them (inherited some 135 ...


2

Those laws are part of a whole set of sumptuary laws that applied not only to slaves, but to citizens as well. For example, another law was that you were not supposed to throw gold into the bier or dress the deceased in more than three robes. If you read the section on Roman sumptuary laws in the link provided above it summarizes the Roman attitudes towards ...


5

I find at least two different sites that show different translations: from here: Anointing by slaves is abolished and every kind of drinking-bout. Let there be no costly sprinkling, . . . no long garlands, . . . no incense-boxes. and here: 6a. ... Anointing by slaves is abolished and every kind of drinking bout ... there shall be no costly ...


1

It is certainly possible. Obviously such a thing would require the monk to learn the Norse language, which would mean it would be years before he would be teaching them anything that required language to convey. Educated slaves rarely appear in the sagas and in fact slaves are rarely mentioned at all for that matter, unlike, for example, in Roman culture ...


3

The Mongols were a relatively backward people in the scholastic sense of the word, and hired conquered scholars to educate them. The Mongols were also very tolerant of most religions in their vast empire, and had priests help "pacify" their various peoples.


-1

I think that this was a terrible time in the US but we learn from our mistakes so maybe this was a blessing in disguise so it would not happen in the future when it would make big impacts.



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