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Afro Carribeans: Afro-Caribbeans are Caribbean people who trace their heritage to Sub-Saharan Africa [...] Between the 16th and 19th centuries, European-led triangular trade brought African people to work as slaves in the Caribbean on various plantations. These Afro Carribeans are descendants of slaves. The slaves hady had no rights and a master of a ...


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There is no way to know since we do not know exactly how they were built. It is probably safe to assume that most of the labor was by slaves. Slavery was common in ancient Egypt and slaves were widespread. One researcher, Rosalie David, in her book "The Ancient Egyptians (Beliefs & Practices)" Sussex Academic Press, estimated that up to 80% of the ...


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So my question is, was the Abolition of Slavery in the United States perceived and advertised as an effort to improve race relations or an improvement to labour laws? Others have given sociopolitical answers, let me give a brief economic one. The ultimate reason for slavery's actual abolition was, at least according to the economic history, an economic ...


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Hardly! I can't put my hand on it now, but I wrote an undergraduate paper on the genesis of US slavery, where I referenced the first documented sale of "Negros" in the American colonies in, I think, 1690. It was fairly obvious from this that it was their difference (perceived as "barbarian", "childlike" and of course non-Christian etc) that made their ...


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Neither. Reasons given for advocating the abolition of slavery usually were: 1) Slavery was a form of theft and totally wrong, unethical, evil and against the will of God. 2) slavery was bad for all white people except for the few actual slave owners. It enabled the slave owners to dominate, oppress, and impoverish the white southerners without their ...


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Depends on how narrowly you define 'freedom'. Certainly many nations have fought to remove districts and states from other nation's rule. For example, the French intervention in the American Revolution helped the Colonists be "free" in their minds, even though they were not chattel slaves originally.


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There is a book on the gag rule and John Quincy Adams' multiyear struggle to overturn it (I read the book and it's a good read...): Arguing about Slavery: John Quincy Adams and the Great Battle in the United States Congress (auth. William Miller, 1995).



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