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1

No. There was the west Africa squadron in the British Empire, long before abolition was seriously thought of in America, although the American navy also attempted to suppress the slave trade. [1]: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/West_Africa_Squadron It would be possible to see the Second World War as an anti-slavery war: it was fought to bring an end to the ...


-4

Maybe the slaves were marked with red iron. This practice was done against black slaves during the triangular trade, later than ancient Rome. This practice was also done in Egypt against hebrew slaves, sooner than ancient Rome. In any case, I remember so from the film “the Ten Commandments”. In addition, the slaves were wearing… their skin colour. In ...


19

Although, as you say, a rich slave might be able to engineer an escape, most slaves were not rich and not educated. Slaves could generally be immediately recognized by their dress. Although there were no laws mandating dress for a slave, they tended to wear clothing which set them apart. For example, no slave could wear the toga, so if a man is wearing a ...


24

Well, I suppose it's a matter of means plus motivation. If you're educated - read/speak Greek and Latin etc - then you'd be valuable, and only the psychopathic master would mistreat a valuable peice of property. And you'd need money to get away - some slaves were relatively wealthy, but stealing from your master would be dangerous, the penalties could ...


2

Probably not. Here's a statement by a modern historian: There were no crusaders for universal abolition at this time; while an ancient Christian (or a Stoic) might esteem a slave as a brother, revolutionary efforts to end slavery were never on the table. Source: Christopher J. Fuhrmann, Policing the Roman Empire, p. 27. Conceivably, other ...


3

Not all Roman "workers" were slaves, and in fact my (very small) Latin dictionary has three words for "workman" - none of them being "servus". To say that in Latin " a world without slaves " would mean "a world without workers" is simply wrong. There were butchers, fishmongers, fullers, dyers, schoolmasters, doctors, tavern-keepers - all workers, but not ...


8

The more I read about the ancient world, the more I come to the conclusion that there was no unified notion of slavery at all. There were multiple things (which the people of the time could distinguish) which we call with the same word, slavery. This is similar to how we call nearly any head of state (and sometimes even not head of state) in ancient world a ...


7

As a matter of proselytization (not just in my country but in every country) or actual policy, it doesn't appear that anyone particularly prominent in ancient times did that, no. It has become fashionable to put that belief on ancient Persia's King Cyrus the Great. There's little doubt that his behavior toward conquered peoples was far better than that of ...


1

Well, very quickly three ideas came to my mind Spartacus rebelion, it was just one of the three servant wars in Rome. ALthough it is pretty obvious, the slaves theirselves wanted to abolish slavery (at least some of them) The myth of atlantis talks about the automatons, some kind of robots designed by the atlanteans so that there will be no need for slaves ...



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