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1

Satires have the problem that they are meant to be a little silly, not convincing. I always hold out for the first scifi story being Kepler's Somnium which was an attempt to draw a convincing inhabited moon. (In circulation as a manuscript by 1611.) The earliest not-sacred non-humans might be the scorpion-men in The Epic of Gilgamesh. (2100 BC)


7

Baptism is one time only in a life in the Roman Catholic Church. So this fiction has a major research fail: an Anglo-Saxon (AS) Christian will be Roman Catholic Church, not Protestant anabaptist religion, and cannot be re-baptised. At confirmation, in modern usage he may add a favorite saint's name to his own and take up using it, but that's modern. Camden ...


2

This question is very vague, but I assume you are asking about the Middle Ages in Western Europe, though there is no reason why it should not be about Byzantium, Islam, India, China or any other mediaeval civilisation. But let us stick to Western Europe. In Western Christendom (and also in Byzantium) the universal system of time-keeping was the Julian ...


0

Because simply, they wanted their children to be as best as possible in Arabic language. This is because desert people Arabic is much better than in cities. A very critical part of Arabs life was poems, which of course require a good language tongue. That's why they were competing each other to send their children to deserts. From wikipedia: As was ...


9

For the most part, church and celestial events. In particular, midsummer and midwinter and the equinoxes were both easy to detect and were important events, at least in the colder climates of Europe. One problem with this approach was that the Julian calendar, which was used pretty much everywhere during the middle ages, by the 1500s had gotten seriously ...


-1

The villagers lived with a set of rights and obligations to their feudal overlords and the church. A dozen geese on Martini, three days of labor maintaining roads in the spring, regular church services, ... They'd have to track that, even if they didn't use the names of months and numbered days in the month.


8

Sati were supposed to be voluntary. Since it was offensive to the sentiments of the Mughals, its rulers such as Akbar the Great explicitly banned involuntary sati. On a superficial level, therefore, most these women were not resistant to committing sati at all. In fact, the Mughals expended a great deal of effort trying to convince women applying for ...


22

Because they believed their infant would have a better chance of surviving in the desert. The child mortality rate from disease and malnutrition in Arab settlements was horrendously high, and it was believed that sending the child into the healthier environment of the desert increased the child's chance of survival. - Gabriel, Richard A. Muhammad: ...


5

This was part of the focus of Piketty's Capital in the Twenty-First Century. He prefers to measure income inequality by looking at the share of the top decile/percentile/0.1% in the national income. In general, the story is that inequality decreased sharply throughout the Great Depression and WWII, and continued on a downward trend until the late ...


1

In early medieval England most people had a single name. It was not common to rename children unless the child was adopted or changed families. However, many people would change their names if their circumstances changed or they moved. Also, people would adopt names to disguise their identity especially if they were engaged in warfare or banditry. Sometimes ...



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