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I'm surprised to hear of women marrying so late, since having children late could be an issue. But maybe they married late due to the fear of death in childbirth. I would also like to know what the differences could be in the different classes. Surely the age of marriage for the aristocracy could well be different to those of the peasant class. I don't ...


1

Why is it that the maiden name is traditionally dropped when a woman is getting married? Is this something that predates back many civilizations ago? Or is this a relatively newfound trend? Inheritable family names may be considered a relatively new trend, only dating back to the dawn of the Renaissance in Europe, that is, their use on a large scale ...


4

Baby-Name Books Down the ages, these mainly did not exist because, down the ages, most people were unable to read a book, and so couldn't use one. Now, it has been suggested that the Bible was a baby-name book. However, a baby-name book (BNB) can be defined as one which exists for people to name their babies out of. I think both the Old and New Testament ...


11

Not really. Generally speaking, most European women since married in their early to mid twenties, to men in their mid to late twenties. The age gap for the commoners, i.e. the vast majority of the population, were typically not large. Unfortunately the question declined to define how much younger is "much younger" supposed to mean, but most Europeans ...


0

It's just another trend. Through most of history, short hair was the mark of a slave. Today, it's mostly because of the industrial revolution and the Second World War. In reality, long hair doesn't get in the way if you know how to. That applies to machinery and warfare. Just another dumb trend accepted by dumb people.


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Movies portray people as having separate beds to get around strict censorship laws which were derived from old religious traditions. In reality, there have been many such movements for and against sleeping together, and it appears to have gone in and out of style through the ages.


2

A few Jews even became prominent slaveowning planters in the Old South ... as successful as these Jewish Southerners were by Southern standards, they represent a very tiny percentage of the 20,000 Jews residing in the antebellum South who could, or would, ever aspire to own a slave. About 5,000 Jews owned one or more slaves - about 1.25 percent of all the ...


19

This modern tradition has its roots in the First World War, when Japan entered on the side of the Allies following the Anglo-Japanese Alliance. Japan's entry carried an initial, overt goal of restoring the German Kiautschou Bay Concession to Chinese sovereignty. The Siege of Tsingtao, the administrative centre of the German concession, ended in the ...


4

First of all, this is not true that "practically all Asian nations were colonized by the Europeans". China and Russia were never colonized and this is a very large part of Asia in territory and population. Middle Asia was colonized by Russia, not by West Europe. European colonizers mostly were successful in those territories close to the ocean. And of ...


-1

Why would you want to colonialize Japan? Japan did not have any interesting resources (gold or spices, like India and America), and did not produce anything that Europe wanted (like silk or porcelain, like China). So, why go into the expense of a war?


-1

Japan's first exposure to the west (in modern times) was through America's Commodore Perry in 1854. American was the most "benevolent" western power insofar as she had few colonies. If Japan had met e.g. British gunboats in the 1850s or 1860s instead, the result might not have been so fortunate Japan undertook the Meiji (modernization) reforms in 1868, only ...


1

Japan compared to China and India, was small and out of the way. They were also extreme isolationists and had very little interactions with outsiders. It wasn't until the 1850's that the US essentially forced open Japan to the outside world. Essentially for the Europeans, Japan was just out of the way, and of no real importance. The only reason the US ...


8

It's obvious that having short or long hair is an identity sign for men and women respectively, more or less worldwide. No, it's not obvious, especially not in history. You may be mistaking a Western, Roman Catholic, modern behavior for something universal. The Romans were a little strange in their belief that men should shave and wear their hair ...


2

There are many books written about this but I am not sure that there is a name for the "filed of study". For example, Carlo Ginzburg, Cheese and worms. The Cosmos of a Sixteenth-Century Miller, https://jhupbooks.press.jhu.edu/content/cheese-and-worms There are also many books, mostly in French which have "Daily life" in their titles, like Edmond Pohnon, La ...


5

Just as I was posting that question and looking for a tag, I saw social-history appear as a suggestion. Sure enough, Social History describes what I am looking for: Social history, often called the new social history, is a broad branch of history that studies the experiences of ordinary people in the past.


2

What period? What place? A soldier for whom? Attacked by whom? Going where? If this guy is a Gaul ambushed by political enemies of his family in the time of Julius Caesar, near his home, it's a different story than a Legionnaire in North Africa during the Punic War. Starting w/road regs differ. First, there were different classes of roads. The ones you ...


2

Unfortunately, I had trouble finding a source of evidence to link to you for this, but I recall that, in a high school US History class, we watched a documentary on the death penalty, and it covered the history of it. There were some hand-painted signs advertising the killing of a known convict, but I can't recall what period they were from. That said, the ...


2

"Race" and "racism" are modern inventions. I have never seen any ancient or medieval writer identifying anybody by race. Actually we can only conjecture to which race some of their personages belonged. The common identifications were by place of birth, religion, social class. And gender, of course (I am not sure what you mean by "sexual identity"). ...


3

I will address race in the west European middle ages, since identity is just too broad to be answered. First of all it is very important to put yourself in the position of a medieval villein, which is what most people were. They usually did not leave the village where they were born. They would know their immediate family, some of the seigneur's officials, ...


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There are a few universal signs that have been true across time and societies as symbols of male and female appearance. They are built in and can't really be emulated by the other gender, and they can be perceived at a distance. Women tend to have wide hips, visible breasts and abundantly thick hair. As a tendency, they usually let it grow out at least to a ...


12

Short answer: no. In general, nobody got "rides" in the ancient world because there were no rides, everybody walked for the most part. Carts were only used to carry cargo, not passengers. You would not want to try to ride in a cart because they had no suspension. Try this: get in a wheelbarrow with a wooden (or iron) wheel (not a pneumatic wheel) and have a ...


3

Just a thought but before World War One men generally had longer hair and beards. However, short hair on men has often been enforced as a mean of control, in police, military and other forces that require obedience and discipline. Slaves and defeated armies were often required to shave their heads. There may be some sort of connection there. As the men in ...



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