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1

Looking further into the other answers, it does seem that weather and diet were closely linked in the minds of many 19th century writers. Thomas Graham (see Semaphore's answer) may have been important in disseminating the belief that vegetables were most beneficial in hot climates, as this begins showing up elsewhere by the end of the century. For example, ...


1

I am not sure if it is the first recognition of healthiness but about the end of age of discoveries, sailors started to realize if they bring sour cabbage with them, they can prevent various diseases. Or better to say some diseases are just don't show up on their ship for the long trip. In those times they knew nothing about Vitamin C, and most of diseases ...


1

In the past there was a great diversity of opinions about what constituted a good diet and you can certainly find examples of people who deprecated, for example, vegetables. However, this was not typical. Overall, the most common recommendations were to eat a variety of food, and to eat less food. Many physicians going forward from Galen recommended the ...


1

I conjecture that this was an empirical result deduced from experience with long distance sea voyages. Scurvy was a real disaster in many long expeditions. Seaman began the dietary experiments to fight scurvy in 18-th century (or maybe earlier, I just do not know the earlier records). At first they tried sauerkraut. The lemon juice was introduced to the ...


3

In his 1827 home medical group, the doctor Thomas J. Graham wrote that: It is a common practice among Europeans in sultry climes to eat plentifully of either fresh or salt meat, at breakfast, tiffin, and dinner; this practice is followed day after day, and my only surprise is, that such a dangerous course of living does not produce a much greater ...


7

Ululation is of such ancient origins, likely in Sumer, that it would be difficult to trace its diffusion to other cultures. For example, a Sumerian proverb written down 4,000 years ago reads: (What characterizes) the carpenter is the chisel (What characterizes) the reed weaver is the basket The blacksmith (is known to) make tiny sides ...


3

The code of Hammurabi included laws regulating beer and beer parlours and it dates back to about 1754 BC, indicating that beer parlours and the commerce of beer were already common at that point. Taverns were also common in the Roman Empire. However with the fall of the Western Roman Empire they seem to have somewhat faded into the background. Wine was too ...


0

Until very recently beer was not sold in bottles or tins, but was tapped from a keg. This meant that if you wanted beer you either went to a tavern, or else you lived in a palace and had a lot of space and a lot of servants, or in a big monastery. In the middle ages beer would normally have been brewed locally, in the tavern itself, the estate or the ...


8

Yes, sort of. Illiterate people could "sign" using hand prints, which is a reasonably reliable biometric (totally anecdotal, but my university's experience was <10% false identification) that's a bit easier to authenticate by the naked eye. Prints of the finger (more than just the tip) could also be authenticated based on feature such as lengths between ...


3

This book chapter, "Childhood in History" by Pat Thane, mentions how children dressed in medieval times in brief. For most of medieval Europe, children dressed much as adults did, which is very much like today (with the exception of school uniforms). In the past few years understanding of such historical changes has been much influenced by the work of ...



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