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4

Here in the UK, a network of bunkers were built and maintained into the 1990's - mostly by the MOD. Unfortunately for us plebs, the vast majority of these bunkers were not intended for use by the general public. Instead the bunkers were intended to be used by local council members, police chiefs, government ministers, military personnel and, of course, the ...


5

Well at least there is social commentary in the form of cartoons. St. Louis Post-Dispatch cartoonist Bill Mauldin drew a cartoon of a dog with its own personal fallout shelter, which was widely reprinted. On the fallout shelter debate Mauldin observed, “The government provided plans for do-it-yourselfers, and speculators got rich selling family-size ...


6

Claude S. Fischer's "America Calling: A Social History of the Telephone to 1940" explores this, and is my source for all that follows. All page numbers refer to that book. For the most part, the telephone was a welcome invention that, aside from its practical applications for business, helped to alleviate the loneliness of rural existence. It was adopted ...


3

New media has often been met with criticism - Semaphore rightfully pointed out that often not the medium but the topic (sex, violence, drugs, blasphemy, ...) is condemned. Still there are example where this wasn't the case. Probably the most clear cut example is from Socrates There is an old Egyptian tale of Theuth, the inventor of writing, showing his ...


0

Once again, it's Google Ngrams to the rescue. Both British and American English show a very strong preference for "Uncle John" over "Uncle Smith" during the Victorian era.


2

I can only answer from a British perspective, but I think the answer is certainly "yes". Jane Eyre always refers to her aunt as "Mrs Reed", and addresses her as " Aunt Reed". First names were far less frequently used in Victorian society - men, and boys at public school (private schools for US readers) almost universally addressed each other by their ...


3

This question cannot be answered historically because the majority of human interactions precede textual records of human interaction.


2

Confining your perspective to just one approach is bound to yield highly subjective results. Modern history tries to implement scientific theory into its proceeding: Gathering evidence, establishing the factual basis, confronting source material (be it written, chemical, archeological...). Quantify what is quantifiable. Postulating a falsifiable hypothesis ...



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