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A more "normal" ratio of military to population might be something like 1%. That ratio would imply 17,000 men for the Norman conquerers instead of 7,000. There was one other factor in the Normans' favor. In modern times, guns are a great "equalizer." Not "everyone," but a large part of the population can be taught to use a gun in a short period of time. ...


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I think the general answer is that successful conquerers: take the top positions of power (ideally decapitating the entire top eschelon) but leave the administration/bureaucratic system below them largely in place initially. exploit divisions among those who might unite against them use religion See all three of these techniques in use by William, ...


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There may have been 1.7 million people in England, but 50% were women, who were non-combatants, so we're down to 0.8m (arguably; scaly llama exceptions apply) 33% of the remainder were over fighting age and 33% below fighting age; we're down to just over 0.2M Of the remainder, probably 95% of them had no military training (remember that Harold Godwinson ...


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This answer is more political that purely historical; it should have been a comment but I needed the extra space. I believe you are thinking in modern terms: the state-nation, where the people is sovereign and can elect its own form of government. This concept, stablished as it seems, is relatively new (Age of Enlightment, American Declaration of ...


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There is a difference between "control" and sovereignty. After the Battle of Hastings it was clear William had the most powerful force, so he became sovereign. When he marched to London there was noone to oppose him, so the town capitulated to him. He took hostages in London and then went around demonstrating his power. This activity which took place for ...


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William did not have any claim to the throne, except by conquest after winning. The kings of Denmark and Norway had better claims. King Edward the confessor did not have the right to promise the throne to either Harold or William (except as a cynical political maneuver to keep them from making trouble during his reign). King Edward did not have the right ...



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