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12

The first thing that came to mind was the Rosetta Stone. While King Ptolemy V Epiphanes' decree that's inscribed in it is not particularly significant, the Rosseta Stone is a trilingual inscription, written in hieroglyphics, demotic Egyptian and Greek, and it's discovery in 1799 lead to the decipherment of hieroglyphics and thus to a far better understanding ...


11

There are some minor works that have been discovered over the past twenty years or so, but nothing of any major importance that I can recall. As to whether or not these other major works have been lost forever, the answer is that they most likely have indeed been lost. The great fire of Rome that Suetonius mentions was responsible for destroying a ...


8

This is the answer I owe you, which I am sure by now will be of no use to you. Disclaimer: here I answer to my own interpretation of the question. Although this is true for every worldly answer, I felt like writing this warning because of the extent of my freedom of interpretation. Also, because of my limited Mediterranean/European background I might be ...


8

I think the Norse discovery of the Americas fit. Around year 1000, an expedition led by Norseman Leiv Eiriksson winter camped on Newfoundland. From the Wikipedia article: For some centuries after Christopher Columbus' voyages opened the Americas to large-scale colonization by Europeans, it was unclear whether these stories [of Leiv Eiriksson's ...


8

The only remotely related quote I could find was: A discussion of the rights of animals would be regarded with far more complacency by many of what are called the wise and the good of our land, than would be a discussion of the rights of woman. (Frederick Douglass in the North Star, 1848) It could be that his words were transformed into the statement ...


7

There are so many lost works that it is probably impossible to establish a comprehensive catalogue. Not to mention of course those works we will never know they even existed. Even in recent times the burning of libraries can wipe out invaluable manuscripts (e.g. Jaffna library). Two examples which immediately come to mind: The history of the Etruscans ...


6

Not to quibble, but this isn't really an 'or' question. Yes, we'll keep discovering things we haven't found, and yes, there are many things that have been permanently lost. Keep in mind that before the printing press you didn't go to the bookstore - you found a guy who had the book you wanted, and asked if you could crash at his house for a couple of ...


6

I'll start with the archetypical story of the type: Troy. Up till 19th century, people believed that Homer's and Virgil's troy was a legend, not a real city (unlike Greeks and Romans). In 1865/1868, Calvert and especially Heinrich Schliemann have found what they believed to be real Troy (though later archaeology, fully detailed on Wikipedia, showed that ...


5

The Wikipedia page on the British Official History of the Great War. A lot of the volumes are available as PDFs in various web archives. For example, this map, in the chapter on First Contact with the Enemy is extracted from a volume freely available:


5

Following-up on @FelixGoldberg's answer I found this in Sources and Notes of Vincent Cronin's Napoleon: The remark attributed to N[apoleon], "I know men, and I tell you that Jesus Christ was not a man" is apocryphal. [Robert-Antoine de] Beauterne, who coined it never met N[apoleon]. This is good enough evidence for me; it suggests the following: ...


5

The problem there is that there isn't a lot of written work from that area available that early. The only real literate society of the ancient era was the Bronze-Age Indus Valley Civilization, and we haven't deciphered their script yet. After the IV civilization was eclipsed, writing was unknown there until about the third century BCE. So for the vast ...


4

The dead sea scrolls are an example of something major being found by chance. It is possible there are other stores like those but it is unlikely. The further we go, the less chance of finding something usable exists. A better link would be the dead sea scrolls online.


4

If the historian Tacitus simply provides too much of a Roman perspective and/or is too late in history (1st century AD), then archaeological evidence is likely the best source (as DVK previously commented). The people of Iron Age Britain Demography The Roman historian described the Britons as being descended from people who had arrived from the ...


4

This quote appears in several mid-1800s texts, including the above-referenced "Sur Le Christianisme" text. Henry Parry Liddon wrote a footnote regarding the quote suggesting its authenticity. He references another Bertrand source, "Sentiment de Napoleon sur la Divinite de Jesus Christ." He cites a response to the author of the preface to Campagnes d'Egypte ...


3

As a community wiki answer: Authorial ignorance. It doesn't test the scope of knowledge of the author Authorial context. Similar texts produced in the similar time. General source context. Survival rate. Did only controversial idiocy survive in the libraries. Did this survive monastery burning because it was being used to insulate a bamboo wall? ...


2

A very interesting question. Not much I can say at the moment, but according to this apparently serious website which gives an annotated list of Napoleonic memoirs, Bertrand did write a book. Bertrand, General Henri-Gratien, comte (1773-1844): Haythornthwaite calls him the most loyal of Napoleon's followers. He served in many of the campaigns, and ...


2

The Archimedes Heat Ray seems to be a good example.


2

The Rigveda, a collection of sacred texts that has formed the base of the Hindu religion and much Indian culture, was verbally composed (originally in archaic Sanskrit) as early as 1700 BC. The Rigveda represents the earliest known writings by the Indo-Aryan peoples, though no document survives containing the original Sanskrit text -- in fact, nothing from ...


2

You can get some pictures of India before CE from: The Vedas and the major Upanishads Arthasastra by Kautilya (Chanakya) Early Buddhist and Jain literature


2

According to the wikipedia article at least, it does seem that there were some political objections to King Edward, but from what I've read and heard, the main reason was the marriage issue. While Edward's political statements and leanings might have made him less popular, without the marriage issue, he would not have been forced to abdicate. He definitely ...


2

The absolutely excellent author is Fernan Braudel. I am afraid, I don't know about the quality of translation of his "Civilization and Capitalism, 15th–18th Centuries", 3 vols. (1979) English translation by Siân Reynolds. The first volume is all about how they lived what ate, what put on, how and why travelled, and everything. This book was also translated ...


2

The art of history is that of using all the knowledge you have, and making logical conclusions based on primary sources. The only way to accurately determine what happened in the past is to get as many different sources as you can, and put them together like a puzzle. Each piece on its own has some truth in it, so that all the pieces together make the whole ...


2

There are no Indian accounts of the Battle of the Hydaspes River. It is difficult to prove a negative, but since there is very little historical material from that era (326 BCE) at all, we can be reasonably certain that there are no historical accounts. Tarn (1966) discusses this when talking about the Bactrian Greeks. Had the story of the Bactrian ...


1

Romila Thapar in "Early India" (pp 48) does say that a Hindu Temple was converted to a Muslim Mosque at Ajmer. But her context is that Religious exchange and interchange cannot be simply explained either by tolerance or bigotry. She also refers to Buddhist "chaityas" being converted to Hindu temples. Note however, there is no direct reference to the Chisti ...


1

Using my elite Amazon search skills, I discovered Tibet: A History by Sam van Schaik, which looks like what you want. Personally, I'm a fan of reading literature and/or biographies, as I find concrete stories give me a better handle on the more abstract cultural or political issues covered in a regular history. Sardathrion's books look interesting, as does ...



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