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4

There are quite a few great sources on this topic. If by “how common”, you are implying that you are looking for hard, measurable and very-much-incomplete sample data (that you have to, of course, collate yourself), this is going to come from digitized historical court records like the Assize Courts that @Kobunite linked to, or from the proceedings of the ...


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Many Greek works of history and otherwise are gone. I suppose it's possible that the odd scroll or piece of information might be found, but it's not likely to ever fill in the gaps that exist. One example would be the Stoics. They are sometimes divided by time period into Early Stoa, Middle, and Late. Among those philosophers, little to nothing is known ...


3

A "primary" source is the first or original source of information about a fact. It has nothing to do with time. Even if an event occurred hundreds of years before, the source is still primary if it is the first or original source of information. For example, let's imagine Henry Neville (1564 – 1615) wrote a letter in 1594 which said that George Neville ...


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assuming the author was in contact with actual eyewitnesses This assumption makes the question dreck, as the question contains the answer within itself. Going then, from the question, assuming that Luke-Acts are a primary source, Luke-Acts are then a primary source.


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There is always hope of recovering lost works. Recently a new fragment of Aristotle was recovered in Oxyrhynncus. Lost works are sometimes found in newly discovered tombs and trash middens. Also, they are sometimes discovered as palimpsests. In other cases, important works are discovered hidden away unnoticed in libraries. A typical example of this was the ...


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Agnes Smedley, Communist spy and triple agent, was writing much of the "reporting" about the Communist army in the field. So, an independent observer rating of less than zero. She also helped the Communists by suckering Gen. Smedley to send them arms. http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/venona/dece_smedley.html


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First of all, it should be noted that Norse mythology was only the longest-lasting offshoot of a much wider spread Germanic mythology. If we restrict ourselves to Norse contemporary sources, then there are only short inscriptions and pictures. For the Germanic mythology, there is one contemporary non-Christian source that must be mentioned: Tacitus. In his ...


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The closest thing we have to a Jewish text in which Jesus makes claims about himself - whether as the messiah, the son of God, or anything else - is Josephus' Antiquities of the Jews. Josephus was a well educated, relatively well-to-do Jewish man, who became an officer in the Jewish rebel army during the Jewish Revolt. He led a unit of soldiers until they ...


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Aside from some short inscriptions on stone, no. The received texts of the sagas generally all date to after about 1000 A.D. and were written or copied at times when Christianization had taken hold. That said, however, it is important to remember that it is likely that the received texts may, in many cases be close copies of manuscripts written during ...



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