New answers tagged

3

http://www.zdnet.com/article/the-wwii-german-army-was-80-horse-drawn-business-lessons-from-history/ Up until 1943 the Wermacht was only 20% motorized. However, this understates the importance of mechanized transport. Consider that a significant fraction of forces were held back for defending and occupying territory, and you'll see that the percentage of ...


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After Germany was defeated in World War 1 the Red Army attempted to invade and conquer Poland. Russia was defeated in this as well so Germany and Russia actually became close allies in the 1920's and 1930's. Its important to note Stalin was Georgian and even though the "Russian side" lost to the "German side" during the Spanish Civil War of 1936 this ...


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In a now-deleted answer @Alex has correctly pointed out that Stalin handed over to the Nazis many German communists who had sought asylum in the USSR. Other users have asked to name some people who have been handed over. Well, for example: Margarete Buber-Neumann Fritz Houtermans Hans Walter David Some more names and details are given here and here. ...


5

There is a list of tonnages by type and year (or rather by 'protocol period', July-June) here. It's very high-level, but it does at least let you show, for example, that food deliveries peaked in 1943-44 and dropped off the following year, replaced by railway equipment and petrol. Chart 6 here gives a rough year-by-year breakdown of numbers of aircraft, ...


0

This remains even today a Battle very much shrouded in mystery...and it's not for lack of Historians digging into the archives. The only substantive reading on the Battle that I have read is that there were 3 Russian Commanders including Zhukov with one of the other two being executed. According to most historical accounts this was the first attempt by the ...


0

the soviet fleet did assist on the arctic convoys as mentionedin a post.it was also a soviet submarine that sank a german hospital ship willhiem gustloff that was acting as a evacuation ship as the russians advanced on the eastern front. wasn't the only timea hospital ship was attacked. a dutch and australian hospital shipswere attacked in the pacific by the ...


1

As an American born in the 1950s, I remember a "fear of the bomb" in the early stages of the Cold War. In addition to "fire drills" we (as schoolchildren) had "bomb drills" of hiding in a "basement," or absent such, under our desks. This was perhaps less so immediately after World War II (1945-1950), and escalated during the 1950s after the McCarthy "anti ...


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One example: Molotov was an old Bolshevik, and a prominent figure. He lived until 1986! There must be some who survived through the 90's.


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The other answers are fantastic, but one more one important point: The perception that the "the USSR was very weak". This perception could be the result of anti-Russian and anti-Soviet propaganda, and is not well grounded in a factual analysis. Stereotypes about Russian bureaucracy and culture are widely present in historical English language media. ...


1

This question is factually silly. Deng Xiaoping was in the same generation as Mao Zedong. Deng Xiaoping was present in Guangxi and Jiangxi, and he was present for the long march, the anti-Japanese war, and the fight against the GMD. He was born in 1904, and was just 9 years younger than Mao Zedong. Officially, he was only in office between 1981 and 1987, ...


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My understanding of the Russian response to the 3rd Reich's "November Campaign" as I think it is known in German History was a shock at the speed with which Germany took "their half" (including Warsaw.) most historians believe this caused the Red Army to dramatically move up the time table for their "part." Whether or not the notable and bloodless success ...


13

No, there were no dates formally agreed upon. Some historians (ref. Victor Suvorov's "Icebreaker") speculate that there is indirect evidence suggesting that along with the "Communazi Pact", the specific date of joint German/Russian invasion on 1 September was agreed, but Suvorov did not provide with any documental evidence. Moreover, it is known that ...


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In the USSR there was none among the common people, maybe except the Cuban crisis period, I don't know. There was totally no fear of war, let alone, a nuclear one. The state propaganda emphasized peace and and international friendship. Regarding the Cuban crisis some people I had talked to said that they realized how dangerous it was only years after, and ...


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I can't think of a single one militarily. The last time I can think of any actual cooperation was under "Nunn/Lugar" which involved the deconstruction of the former Soviet Union's vast stockpiles of nuclear weapons. There are rumors that the USA and Russia are cooperating in Syria...but Russia's stated goal is to keep Assad in power whereas the USA has ...


3

Depends somewhat on your definition of 'engagement' and 'conflict'. (Or, in the case of Syria, your definition of 'joint'...) The UNTSO peacekeeping/observation mission in the Middle East had a permanent allocation of both American and Soviet military representatives (36 of each) between 1973 and the end of the Cold War. UNTSO still has Russian ...


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There were not many military interventions by the USSR in the decades between WWII and ISIS. The Soviet Union only fought with Afghanistan and China during these decades, and a couple of 'invasions' of Warsaw pact countries. This list shows where the USSR fought in these years. Comparatively, the US actively fought in Vietnam, Korea, Laos, Cambodia, ...


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No, individuals didn't have and couldn't have electricity for free. It's clear that if there were just a limit on the maximum consumption of electricity (or water or anything else), most people would saturate it and the production wouldn't be sufficient. The prices only followed the template of "total regulation" and "permanent monopoly", so they were ...


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These questions are nicely answered in various historical books, e.g. Political Legitimation in Communist States. The short answer is that he didn't. If you click at this link, you will be told that first of all, contrary to an uninformed claim by another user, Lenin has never been considered a charismatic man during his life – simply because he obviously ...



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