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Hitler split up his Eastern Front army... Bad decision.. He should have kept his army intact, took the oil fields of southern Russia and while having his army intact, he could have taken and kept Stalingrad... He tried to swallow a huge 5 course meal in one bite and inevitably choked to death.


13

A number of things went wrong in the German advance on Stalingrad. One of them is that after Paulus made it to the Volga in late August, 1942, he was supposed to chase the Russians into Stalingrad where the Luftwaffe would supposedly bomb them to death. But the Luftwaffe bombed Stalingrad before the Russians retreated, which is to say that most of them ...


6

The problem was that Stalingrad is actually a huge city. It lies for miles on the west bank of the Volga. The Volga in many places is a mile wide or more and if defenders are in the city it would be easy to supply them by barge from the river. Establishing a force on the east bank would have been pointless because there was nothing to attack there and there ...


8

The answer is Hitler. He was obsessed with the political damage the falling of a city named "Stalingrad" would have upon Stalin and the USSR, and wanted it more or less destroyed, so he explicitly ordered von Paulus not to encircle the city and wait for it to die(as the normal procedure would be), but to capture and raze it. Paulus was hesitant, but ...


11

The Germans changed the gauge from Russian to German and could then use their own equipment. http://www.lexikon-der-wehrmacht.de/Zusatz/Heer/Eisenbahnpioniere.htm shows Wehrmacht railroad engineers (the military sort of engineer) changing the gauge. Reichsbahn personnel, civilians and forced laborers were also used to change the gauge.


5

Unlike other East European states, the Russians did not free Yugoslavia from the Axis, so they never had forces deployed in the country. An attack would be an invasion. Also, Yugoslavia was easy for the West to send support to, from the Adriatic, Greece and Italy. They had their own army, and it was a fairly good one. So you have a good army to fight, ...


8

Actually, the problems were worse than just rebuilding the railroads to narrow the gauge. Soviet stations, where trains were refuelled were too far apart for German engines - the larger Soviet engines carried more fuel and water and could go farther. The Germans had to rebuild the railroad to a narrower and also create new stations along the path to ...


18

It was more of a nuisance, than a reason for defeat. The part of a track that is hard to build is the bed. To narrow a track, all you have to do is pull out the spikes, move the rail and drive the spikes back in again. The bigger problem for the Germans was that the rail system in Russia is a hub-and-spokes design where all roads lead to Rome, meaning ...


33

The overall answer is that the Soviets were not rich in railways and destroyed much of it as they retreated. The Germans anticipated this, and had railway commandos rebuild much of the Soviet trunk lines and some feeders to standard gauge. They also maintained several of the wide gauge lines if captured intact and with enough rolling stock. Some efforts, ...


4

Stalin lacked adequate forces while maintaining other commitments during his life time to do so. While organisation for an offensive was desultory during the 1947-1950 period, from 1950 the Soviet Union decided to reorganise the surrounding state's militaries on a new basis. In the opinion of Tismaneanu, had the Soviet Union bordered Yugoslavia, ...


0

The "original" UN consisted of countries in several distinct categories: 1) the "Big Four" of America, Britain, the Soviet Union, and China 2) British "Commonwealth" countries such as Australia, New Zealand, Canada, South Africa and others 3) Latin "American" countries in Central and South America and 4) "captive" nations under Nazi rule with governments in ...



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