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4

Probably not. Posey's brigade had only 1300 men. Wright was advancing into the gap left when the III corps under Sickles advanced out to the Peach Orchard and Emmitsburg Road. Odds are that Posey would have been advancing into the II, I, and XI corps units on the hill that the next day would repel Pickett's Charge. Posey would have been exposed to ...


3

A lot of the main reasons have already been mentioned, such as supplies, strategy (you wouldn't want to leave an enemy behind you etc) and the fact that you can setup base if you overtake it - allowing you to push forward. It would have been a strategic move to put the castle there in the first place, so being able to have that advantage is worth it. ...


2

If we talk about those small castles on hilltops which (or their ruins) can be found all over mainland Europe, it's important to first understand what their purpose was. We are not talking about early medieval castles which were just protecting the property of a single family, but military installations of late medieval to early modern Europe. So, what ...


5

Because they're the goal Go around castles to where exactly? Military campaigns usually have some goal in mind - typical goals include (a) conquering territory; (b) robbing wealth; (c) long-term damage to an enemy. Achieving these goals requires taking the castles - in earlier times, most of important people, wealth and military force would be moved ...


2

Most often, it would be related to supply - castles will often overlook or block roads or passes. An army requires a vast amount of food and other supplies, which can either be brought by wagon from 'home' or taken from your enemies (and thus it's likely stored in the castle). A large army might be able to walk around a castle, but then when the army has ...


27

Armies go around castles all the time, but what usually happens is that the castle is placed under siege. This is done at least with the intention of keeping the defenders in, and hopefully taking the castle via attrition, bombardment, sapping or treachery. The need to siege the castle is important; if you ignore the castle and march on, this leaves the ...


21

There are at least two reasons. The first is that a castle is usually located on the most strategic ground in the area, a hill, river, etc. Basically, it is, or controls, the most valuable "real estate' in the region. If an attacking army controls the "rest of the region" without controlling the castle, it hasn't achieved much. The second reason is that ...


55

There are two assumptions that need to be clarified. What is the attacker's strategic intent? What time are you talking about? If the attacker wants to possess the territory defended by the castle, then "going around" isn't an option. "Going around" only makes sense if the attacker wants to control territory beyond the castle. This also assumes that the ...


11

Spraff, you aren't considering why the castle is placed where it is. Does it control a ford or landing point? Does it guard the best passage through a hill/mountain range? The placement of the castle is why it exists in the first place; they're built at strategic locations which forces the enemy into either attacking or besieging them.



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