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according to bayeaux, pretty tight: The shield wall tactics are not entitled only to roman origins, almost any culture that develops heavy shields will develop a close formation to take advantage of them. Taking in count the influences of roman military in Brittania, and that during the late empire ( ~400) those tactics were still used and adapted to ...


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There's an underlying question of "why would a commander choose to charge through a minefield?" The main purpose of a minefield is not to stop an attack, but to slow it down and restrict the attacker's movement while they carefully pick their way through it. A good minefield is placed in restricted terrain with clear fields of fire from the defenders, ...


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He didn't, and didn't plan to. The minefield at the entrance to Mobile Bay was well-known and clearly marked. Its purpose wasn't to sink attacking ships, but to force them close to the guns of Fort Morgan, where they could easily be sunk by artillery fire. Farragut's initial plan for the battle was for two columns of ships to enter the bay through the ...


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Because the Roman infantry developed a "two wave" attack structure. The phalanxes used long spears, whose advantage was that they could kill enemies at "long range" (15-20 feet). So the Romans broke up their attack into two stages. The first part was with "pilum" (throwing spears), which were launched from 50-60 feet away, and had a greater range than ...



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