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10

This information turned out surprisingly easy to find. The Boston Tea Party museum website lists the following facts: 342 chests on three ships 92,000 pounds (roughly 46 tons) reported damage £9,659 equivalent to $1,700,000 in todays money I would be very careful with the total weight stated, particularly because the one chest I could find definitely ...


10

Actual tax figures had less to do with the revolution than the lack of representation in British Parliament. In short, many in those colonies believed the lack of direct representation in the distant British Parliament was an illegal denial of their rights as Englishmen, and therefore laws taxing the colonists (one of the types of laws that affects the ...


9

A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, John Murray, London, 1875 covers custom duties in the Roman Empire at some length: PORTO′RIUM was one branch of the regular revenues of the Roman state, consisting of the duties paid on imported and exported goods: sometimes, however, the name portorium is also applied to the duties raised upon goods for being ...


8

Like most questions about Roman history, the answer depends on the era you're considering. In the early days of the Roman Republic, public taxes consisted of modest assessments on owned wealth and property. The tax rate under normal circumstances was 1% and sometimes would climb as high as 3% in situations such as war. These modest taxes were levied ...


7

Roman taxes varied over time, but was generally a couple of percent on wealth, and sometimes also on sales. However, in the provinces they could not reliably tax in this way, and instead they put a levy on the whole province payable by the governor of the province, who in return got pretty much free reign in the province. So what he taxed and how much, was ...


6

Such concern likely existed, and there is evidence of some cursory discussion to that effect during the proceedings of the Continental Congress. The rationale for creating a federal district with sole jurisdiction of the Congress was probably laid out best (among the surviving documents) by James Madison: The indispensable necessity of complete authority ...


5

I believe the answer is "everything except for the tax on tea". The Townshend Acts except for the taxes on tea were finally repealed in March of 1770. Wikipedia confirms On the 5 of March 1770— the same day as the Boston Massacre—Lord North, the new Prime Minister, presented a motion in the House of Commons that called for partial repeal of the ...


5

Britain taxed the American colonies to help pay for the French and Indian War. Together with the taxes, Britain placed restrictions on their colonists crossing the Appalachian Mountains (to pacify certain Indian allies like the Iroquois. The colonies felt that they had done Britain a favor by fighting on the front lines. They felt that they should have ...


5

The question moves from two observations— that among industrialized nations, the United States spending on philanthropy is the highest (1.67%) and that its taxes on high-income individuals are among the lowest— to a speculation about the thought process of donors. Hmm, well. There have been a number of studies on the effects of income tax rate changes on ...


4

An alternative explanation could be that wealthy people (in general) are just more stingy and less altruistic. Freakonomics releates the story of a Bagel vendor whose business involved leaving bagels and a cash box open at various businesses, and who kept meticulous notes on the amount of theft each business dealt him. One thing he found was that larger ...


4

In medieval times (and even in modern times) taxes were highly irregular and varied from place to place. In many instances a "tax" was really just a robbery. For example, in England since Domesday the most omnipresent "tax" was what was called the "hearth tax". The way this originally worked is that Norman soldiers went from village to village and visited ...


3

First imagine a world without any coinage, where all purchases and sales must be achieved through barter. Further imagine that there are well accepted equivalencies, between all goods so that an average ox is understood to be worth 10 average sheep, 8 average goats, etc. Three of those goods will of course be copper, silver and gold, so that there will be ...


2

Let's look at inflation first. "when the coins are too much altered, the result is inflation." When coins are altered, they are almost always debased - other metals are mixed with silver to allow the government to mint more coins with the same amount of specie. So if I have enough silver to produce 1000 coins, and I mix in 50% tin, I can now ...



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