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I saw a television show "The Naked Archaeologist" that had on the show a large (several foot square) slab of glass in Israel with some graves around it. The slab was intended for the Temple in Jerusalem but never left for some reason, and later rabbis liked to be buried near it after the fall of the Temple to partake in its leftover spiritual closeness to ...


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Technically speaking "flat glass" was introduced by the Romans as glass for construction of window panes. These were produced as early as the first century CE, and is commonly found in Roman sites in Britain as well. Pieces as large as 30 by 40 inches have also been uncovered at Pompeii. Such early windows were usually quite small, of irregular thickness, ...


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Although the Romans and Greeks used glass to make vessels, the use of glass for window panes did not start until the middle ages. Bede states that the first use of glass in England was in 684. Until about 1200 window glass was very expensive and only found in cathedrals or large monasteries or other similar major buildings. From about 1200-1600 the Venetians ...


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Well the answer is they didn't. The pyramids were built by pulling blocks up on ramps. ^ that is probably what it looked like. Herodotus's machine did exist according to painting but it was probably not used to build the pyramids like he said. But it was used for getting water out of the nile river. The second theory centers on Herodotus's machines. ...


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I remember being told that the development of glass making was one of the key technological breakthroughs that enabled the Enlightenment in Europe. Originally used for making vessels and windows, it allowed optics such as telescopes, magnifiers, microscopes, etc to be made. Once these had been invented sciences such as astronomy, chemistry and biology could ...


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Ony theory I have read is (I believe Jared Diamond) that Europes diversity and fragmented nature spurred innovation, while the united China was much more controllable. To explain that: China produced more Iron, better ships etc. in the time of the early European (1600+) conquests, but when the empires bureaucracy feared the growing power of the merchants it ...


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First, you can put aside the "Well the Europeans were just cleverer", as even a cursory glance at world history will show inventions and developments from all societies at one time or another, from the Incan to the Chinese. What I think could likely be the main trouble the Chinese had with technology is that the scale of the Chinese nation was so large. In ...


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This is kind of an off-topic question because any answer will be a matter of opinion, but I guess I will take a stab at it. First of all, Indian mathematics was very advanced in some regards and we ended up borrowing elements of it (via the Arabs), such as the use of "Arabic" numerals, which are actually of Indian origin. Indian computation of planetary ...


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Although the wikipedia article notes that a major cause of the rebellion was an agrarian crisis, note that famine is often caused due to factors other than agricultural production alone. Often bad distribution, heavy taxes and low market prices for agricultural produce cause famine. While it may look like agricultural technology was in its infancy then, ...



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