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Just an addition (or an extended comment) to other answers. I wouldn't say that people being conservative could not change time units quickly. They use time measurements everyday, it is more often than eg. measuring distances, however, people use money everyday also very often. Most money reforms (the largest are converting to euro in EU countries) takes at ...


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Why did decimal time fail? Rhetorical question: Why did the International Standards Organization's (ISO) Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) fail? The answer is that there wasn't a mess that desperately needed to be cleaned up. ISO was a bit late. An ad hoc standard was already maturing and taking over. You wrote your question, and I wrote this answer ...


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They also introduced decimal angle measures (100 degrees in the right angle, each degree is 100 minutes. This explain why the kilometer was originally defined as it was: it is one decimal minute of the Earth's meridian, like the nautical mile is one ordinary minute of the same). I can name three reasons why the decimal system for time did not survive. ...


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Because: a) time change was more complex than the change of other measures, and b) in contrast with the other changes, it actually did not impove anything. Let's go with "a". For dealing with weights, lengths and volumes, sellers would usually have some simple measuring tools, using reference units; for measuring lengths of cloth they would have a stick ...


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I don't know if it will help clarify, but using some of my own-read knowledge, it would be the safest to say that the Japanese sword (to be exact, during the mainstream Sengoku period) were made with processes that DID involve pattern welding or lamination (there may be cases of both for all we know). Do note that these mostly only held true for actual ...


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China's problems with science appear to have begun with the steam and internal combustion engines of the 18th and 19th century. Prior to the 18th century, China appears to have been ahead of Europe in science. On the other hand, China was less noted for "engineering." Basically, the Chinese culture discouraged educated people from getting their hands dirty, ...


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In Dutch this is known as wet van de remmende voorsprong, which has been translated to Law of the handicap of a head start on Wikipedia. The page has a few examples similar to yours. That a page with such an awful name exists plus the number of discussions I find about how to translate the Dutch phrase makes me think that there is no exact name for this ...


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One possible term for the situation you described is technological lock in. This is more commonly associated with the development of sustainable energy (vs cheap oil), so it is probably not the specific name you were looking for. It does however refer to a similar situation where non-optimal (for a given definition thereof) technology becomes dominant, and ...



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