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1

The day hasn't always started at midnight. Up to late 1805 the Royal Navy used three days: nautical, civil (or "natural"), and astronomical. A nautical day entered in a ship's log as 10 July, for example, in fact commenced at noon on 9 July civil reckoning, PM therefore coming before AM. The astronomical day of 10 July, on the other hand, commenced at ...


2

The natural clock on which all systems of time reckoning are based is the Sun. Noon is an astronomically defined event (does not depend on any convention): it is the upper culmination of the Sun. Midnight is similarly defined, it is the lower culmination. The lower culmination is not a visible event in most latitudes, most of the time. So there are two ...


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What I have gathered the best explaination is a combination of the many great answers given, bulleted below -Time accuracy was not neccesary until fairly recent times -When it became neccesary, globalization was beginning in earnest and calandar conversion is much more difficult and trade impeding than other units. -Finally, rather than overhaul the ...


7

Some societies use sunset as the end of one day, and the start of the next: this is recorded in Genesis, chapter 1; for example, the Athenians, or see the Jewish civil day Some traditional agricultural societies start the day with dawn, but Roman civil society defined the day as beginning at midnight. The day was divided into ante meridiem (am) and post ...



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