Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

18

Let me answer as a German with an analogy. You can compare the German speed limit to weapon ownership in US. Any party suggesting introduction of a general speed limit would conduct political suicide and face serious debates with the automobile lobby and voters (most workplaces here come from this branch). Most rational arguments points towards a speed ...


15

I think, it depends on the definition of a road. Most old roads will start as a path trail, later it will be paved. Maybe it will decline and become again a trail. I think some of the oldest roads will be a mountain pass. An example: The Brenner Pass in the Alps was already used in the stone age (Ötzi was found nearby).


13

Seems to be an apocryphal story. The first steam locomotive that transported passengers is thought to be the Puffing Devil, created by Cornish inventor Richard Trevithick. Its first demonstration was on Christmas Eve 1801, after being assembled in a Redruth blacksmith shop. The event became a passenger carrying exercise because bystanders jumped on to the ...


9

The common date is the massive introduction of the automobile, in the early 1900s (interpreting these data) or 1908 (Ford T model production start). After the US civil war, a lot of train robberies happened, but the trains (as later the planes again high-jacking) were rapidly secured. The car itself rapidly became more value for potential robbers than most ...


8

According to this inscription on a Pony Express marker only one out of 120 riders was killed in the 19 months. This would mean that the probability of getting killed on this job within a year was 0.5%. Then again - one death isn't anywhere near statistically significant. I see little reason to doubt these figures that are repeated on many websites. The ...


8

Before the war, only a limit of 30 km/h inside towns was in force, but no other general speed limits. In the Third Reich, there was a general speed limit of 40km/h inside of towns, and 80km/h outside. This was mostly to conserve resources for the war (and because several high ranking Nazis had been killed in accidents on the new Autobahnen). Being a ...


7

Damascus, in southwestern Syria, is widely believed to be the oldest continuously inhabited city in the world. Therefore, it's not a stretch to suggest that the city of Damascus has the oldest road in the world. A road that would also meet the following criteria. 1. System of paving 2. Continual upkeep 3. Continual control by a city 4. Continuous use, ...


7

There have been several travels in boats reconstructed from the relevant times. One that I can find good records of is the boat known is Aifur. It travelled in 1994 from Sigtuna in Sweden to Novgorod. This took 41 days. In 1994, the Aifur crossed the Baltic Sea and sailed up the rivers Neva and Volkhov to Novgorod. Distance covered was 1382 km. The ...


5

I wasn't able to find a definitive proof yet, but most likely it was because of the largest taxicab company (associated with both livery service AND manufacturing of taxicabs) that was called "Checker Taxi". The 'Checker', particularly the 1956-82 A8/Marathon, remains the most famous taxi cab vehicle in the United States. The vehicle is comparable to the ...


5

I guess the first one could be the Pullman's promotional train of 1870. It started from Boston on May 23rd, 1870, went to San Francisco and then back to Boston, completing the round-trip on July 1, 1870. It was not a regular line. Specifically built for the trip, it took 130 passengers, mostly wealthy members of the Boston Board of Trade with families. ...


5

I would vote for Grand Trunk Road. EDIT: I just learned about the Ridgeway, in England. Over 5,000 years old and still in use.


5

Probably for "Field Carrier Landing Practice". Here is a modern example Of course it's a "probably", I can't find a decent source for this in particular. I imagine they would have stored chocks, arrestor wires in there but I can't find a source. Another image link ,Different Picture


5

The best candidate for protagonist in this story is probably William Murdoch, an employee of Boulton and Watt's who had an interest in using Watt's steam engine concepts for locomotion. What is well-documented is that in 1784 he built a working model in his living room (yes, household model trains are older than real trains!), and then probably another ...


5

There are some very old streets in England, the oldest believed to be Vicar's Close in Somerset, from around the 14th century - but that is actually quite modern compared to others. Pompeii is an obvious example from the 6th-7th century, where the street names were clearly signed. A street plan shows that pretty much all streets and alleys were named. ...


5

According to this source, Carthage remained a minor Phoenician outpost until after the fall of Tyre to Alexander the Great in 332 BC. At that time many of the wealthy citizens of Tyre, having ransomed themselves from Alexander, moved to Carthage and began the constructions that led to it rapidly becoming the wealthiest city of the Western Mediterranean. If ...


4

So finally, after all google searches failed, I had to search manually and now I must admint that the information is available even in english. A: The first screen door system was installed on 4. November 2005 at Sadang Station. Source: Seoul metro official site


4

The numbers can only be estimated, and that is especially difficult for the overland arrivals. There is some basis for the arrivals by sea in that the only major port, San Francisco, did try to keep records. Clay and Jones (2008) estimate that in 1848-50 there were over 101,000 overland immigrants and likely over 75,000 by sea, or perhaps 60% by land. ...


4

Italy's Appian Way began construction in 312 BCE. It is still in use, at least as a bicycle path. I am not certain whether any of the current material could be dated to the original construction. Links: Wikipedia; New York Times (reg. req.).


3

This isn't a complete answer, but may help. An alternate line of attack is to look at the history and etimology of the word 'Valet' itself. I can't vouch for the reliability of the source, but etymonline.com drops these suggestive titbits: Modern sense is usually short for valet de chambre; the general sense of "male household servant of the meaner sort" ...


3

Tim Blanning The Pursuit of Glory has a whole chapter dedicated to this covering Europe between 1648 and 1815. It covers costs, travel times, and road availability as well as water ways. However, that is just a narrow part in time and local.


3

The "Propaganda de Portugal Society" probably refers to the "Touring Club de Portugal", previously known as "Sociedade de Propaganda de Portugal". It's foundation date is 28/02/1906. That's probably why they date the poster as post-1906. The only thing I can guarantee is that it can't be from before, not in that form. Maybe the society recycled some other, ...


3

Things I'm noticing: Mostly steam ships are depicted. The big one in the foreground also has masts for sails. The first such hybrid ocean liner was the SS Great Western, in service from 1838 to 1856. The last such ocean liner to be built was perhaps the SS La Touraine which was in service from 1890 to the 1920s. The two-mast depiction there looks much more ...


3

The reason why your source does not give the starting location (Los Angeles) is because it took him months to do it due to weather and other delays, so the arrival notification just included the final legs: The Brooklyn Daily Eagle Almanac, 1912 Robert G. Fowler (Wright Model B), started from San Francisco for New York Sept. 11, 1911, reaching Colfax, ...


3

HMS Spurious was a 1930's Albion Bus that, as your quote says, was converted to resemble the island of an aircraft carrier. It was used by the Deck Landing Control Officers school based at RNAS East Haven. Extract from The British Fleet Air Arm in World War II By Mark Barber. The book, at least in its google books form, does not directly mention HMS ...


2

The idea that the first steam engine powered locomotive was treated as such magic is ludicrous, the steam engine was invented in the first century AD, but first became commercially useful during the industrial revolution, with the Newcomen Atmospheric Engine, which was used to pump water out of mines (that's a problem when you dig bellow sea level!) which ...


1

Here is an interesting and well-cited article from Ferris State University College of Technology Surveying Engineering (there's a name that flows from the tongue) covering the technical aspects of ancient Roman surveying techniques.


1

The question should be why are there speed limits for driving in other countries? There is no limit as to how fast you can walk, run, ride a bicycle, or various other forms of travel. Even planes and ships do not have speed limits - so why should automobiles? They really shouldn't. It is mostly a ploy to get money - fine people who are going "too fast" ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible