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28

Snow removal takes a lot of effort. It was easier to switch out wheeled carriages for sleighs. Sleighs work better with more snow, so that according to this article: in the 18th and 19th centuries, "snow was never a threat" to road travel, "but rather it was an asset." The more densely packed snow became, the better. Some municipalities even had ...


14

Seems to be an apocryphal story. The first steam locomotive that transported passengers is thought to be the Puffing Devil, created by Cornish inventor Richard Trevithick. Its first demonstration was on Christmas Eve 1801, after being assembled in a Redruth blacksmith shop. The event became a passenger carrying exercise because bystanders jumped on to the ...


5

The best candidate for protagonist in this story is probably William Murdoch, an employee of Boulton and Watt's who had an interest in using Watt's steam engine concepts for locomotion. What is well-documented is that in 1784 he built a working model in his living room (yes, household model trains are older than real trains!), and then probably another ...


4

It seemed to follow the bright red path depicted in this image: The Incan Empire had built and maintained a very extensive road transport system prior to their conquest by Spain. Segments of the old roads were converted into, and subsequently expanded upon, to form this particular El Camino Real.


3

I am a regular stackexchange user but never in the history boards before. This post caught my eye. My Great Grandmother lived as a pioneer homesteader/farmer in Klamath Falls, Oregon. Her father died when she was very young, and her older brother badly injured his knee on a nail that worked itself loose on a horse drawn sleigh. He moved into the city to ...


3

@twoshedas answer, currently the accepted one, mentions just one approach but there were others. For example, in Montreal, Canada, large shafts that lead from the street level down to the sewers were used by city workers to push snow off the street and out of sight. From UnderMontreal A 19th century snow-dump shaft at the beginning stages of the Cote ...


2

There are web sites that discuss the history of Channel ferries. Paddle steamers made their appearance in the early 1800s: Of course, every kind of boat could be used as a ferry, even small foot powered paddle boats. The 1827 scene below is from the United States, but the same kind of boats were used in the English channel:


2

The idea that the first steam engine powered locomotive was treated as such magic is ludicrous, the steam engine was invented in the first century AD, but first became commercially useful during the industrial revolution, with the Newcomen Atmospheric Engine, which was used to pump water out of mines (that's a problem when you dig bellow sea level!) which ...


2

Tripodon Street, in Plaka, Athens, has been used continuously since 500 B.C


1

The simple answer is that they used a form of surveying tool called a groma. This basically consisted of two pieces of wood nailed together to form a square cross with right angles in all corners. Each piece of wood had lead weights attached to the end, and they determined they had a straight line when the lead weight from one piece of wood lined up with the ...


1

The main reason may simply be that there doesn't need to be a speed limit, and that there never was a compelling reason to implement one. For the most part, freeway speeds are self-regulating. Secondly, it is simply not true that there is no speed limit on the freeway. There is no general speed limit, but most stretches of the Autobahn do have individual ...



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