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Snow removal takes a lot of effort. It was easier to switch out wheeled carriages for sleighs. Sleighs work better with more snow, so that according to this article: in the 18th and 19th centuries, "snow was never a threat" to road travel, "but rather it was an asset." The more densely packed snow became, the better. Some municipalities even had ...


9

Smoking was allowed on the hydrogen filled zeppelin, the Hindenburg, but only in a specially made pressurized smoking room. the smoking room was separated from the rest of the passenger section by a double-door airlock. The smoking room was closely monitored at all times by a member of the zeppelin’s staff, and only one electric lighter was ...


8

Conventions for driving on one side of the road go back to at least the Roman Empire: In late 1998, the remains of a Roman quarry was discovered at Blunsdon Ridge, near Swindon, England. It is one of the largest and best-preserved Roman quarries known. Ruts in the road leading to this quarry are much deeper on one side of the road than on the ...


7

The decline of wagon trains in the United States started in 1869, with the completion of the first transcontinental railroad, and wagon trains as a way of migrating essentially ended in the 1890s. Covered wagons, on the other hand, stuck around for a long time. The covered wagon of the migrations evolved from freight wagons such as the Conestoga, and ...


7

It took about two weeks. By 1890 postal unions had been formed allowing mail to transit around the world to most places. The domestic rate in the US was 2¢ per ounce. For a first class letter weighing 1/2 ounce or less to Britain the union cost would be an additional 5¢. Thus, the total cost was 7¢ for a first class letter. Here are the rates from 1890, ...


6

A rough estimate of the time is as follows: the distance from London to NY is approximately 3000 (nautical) miles. The Blue Riband prize was awarded to passenger liners which showed the average speed of about 15 knots, (20 knots was the world record in 1889), so I suppose it is safe to assume that an average ship at that time could cross with the average ...


4

The decline of wagons was very gradual. They were displaced for long-distance movement of bulk goods starting in the 1820s and 1830s by the canal building frenzy sparked by the success of the Erie Canal. Canals were the cheapest way to ship bulk goods for a long time. By the 1840s, ocean-faring steamboats provided direct competition to wagons for ...


4

It seemed to follow the bright red path depicted in this image: The Incan Empire had built and maintained a very extensive road transport system prior to their conquest by Spain. Segments of the old roads were converted into, and subsequently expanded upon, to form this particular El Camino Real.


3

I am a regular stackexchange user but never in the history boards before. This post caught my eye. My Great Grandmother lived as a pioneer homesteader/farmer in Klamath Falls, Oregon. Her father died when she was very young, and her older brother badly injured his knee on a nail that worked itself loose on a horse drawn sleigh. He moved into the city to ...


3

@twoshedas answer, currently the accepted one, mentions just one approach but there were others. For example, in Montreal, Canada, large shafts that lead from the street level down to the sewers were used by city workers to push snow off the street and out of sight. From UnderMontreal A 19th century snow-dump shaft at the beginning stages of the Cote ...


3

There are web sites that discuss the history of Channel ferries. Paddle steamers made their appearance in the early 1800s: Of course, every kind of boat could be used as a ferry, even small foot powered paddle boats. The 1827 scene below is from the United States, but the same kind of boats were used in the English channel:


2

Tripodon Street, in Plaka, Athens, has been used continuously since 500 B.C


1

The simple answer is that they used a form of surveying tool called a groma. This basically consisted of two pieces of wood nailed together to form a square cross with right angles in all corners. Each piece of wood had lead weights attached to the end, and they determined they had a straight line when the lead weight from one piece of wood lined up with the ...


1

The main reason may simply be that there doesn't need to be a speed limit, and that there never was a compelling reason to implement one. For the most part, freeway speeds are self-regulating. Secondly, it is simply not true that there is no speed limit on the freeway. There is no general speed limit, but most stretches of the Autobahn do have individual ...



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