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16

It took between 7 and 10 days, depending on the ship and the weather. The ships sailed out of Liverpool and Queenstown. Here is a notice from "London and Its Environs: Handbook for Travellers" (1889):


9

It turns out there was an unofficial award for doing this particular trip the quickest in a passenger liner, so we have pretty good records. Of course a typical passage would be a bit slower than one where a captain was pushing to win the record, but the times can be seen as a close lower bound to how long it would take for a typical trip. In the 1890's the ...


6

I would recommend a read through Janet Abu-Lughod's book, Before European Hegemony. This covers trade routes and practices in different areas of the world during the late 14th through early 16th centuries. The remainder of this answer is pulled in great part from what I understood of the book. Water ways are preferred due to a lower rate of banditry. While ...


-4

You could find a little example of Soviet Union directly now in North Korea. As you can see, it is totalitarian government that exactly a micro-copy of Soviet Union. Why does traveling denied for North Korea's citizen? Because there is War. Great Cold War with 80+ years of history. The same picture was in Soviet Union. Evil capitalist with CIA ( ...



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