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The wording of the question betrays the bias of hindsight. The idea that Hitler could have been brought to heel by decisive collective action in the mid-1930s has tremendous appeal now. But at the time rigidly upholding the terms of an unworkable 20-year-old treaty would have seemed to most people to invite disaster not avert it. Breaching the treaty It ...


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Concentrating on the Rhineland as a major breach of the treaty, Britain and France had 3 choices. 1) War. This was out. A lot of blame has been heaped upon the politicians for that, but the populations of these countries, as well as their colonies and allies, were firmly opposed. 2) economic blockade. In modern times countries are relatively good at ...


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I think it is important to understand the environment in the rest of Europe at that time. Spain had a civil war 1936-1939 (some considering that it was a test for WW2) Italy was under control of fascism. But lets talk about more "important" countries, in England, the primer minister at the time was more inclined to negotiate rather than to attack, the ...


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You and the examiner were right to say 'false'. However, it's not a good fit for a true/false question. In 1688, after the deposition of James II, the English parliament was divided in two groups, Tories and Whigs, whose political characteristics corresponded to the religious creed professed: Tories, conservatives, were Catholics; Whigs, liberals, were ...


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In the old days (meaning pre-Tudor times) the land of Britain was divided into parts each assigned to a man bound to the king by oaths of fealty and often blood ties in one way or another. Such men were responsible for supplying the king with soldiers, if need be, and themselves serving as knights. These men were generally known by the name of the land to ...


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A few things to note regarding this - 1. Official stand was that the state will lapse to independence but Mountbatten told almost every ruler that independence is impossible. 2. Reading's letter to the Nizam of Hyderabad clearly stated that Hyderabad is a subsidary of British Empire and not an independent state/state in alliance. While the British ...


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No. Read up on WIlliam Wilberforce and Pitt the younger. Quakers and anti-abolitionist forces in the UK made noble and exhaustive efforts to end slavery, but the political coalition simply wasn't there. If it had been possible to end slavery earlier, Wilberforce would have done so.



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