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2

In addition to realpolitik and defensive considerations mentioned above, here are two more reasons: Gibraltar has been under British rule for significantly longer than Hong Kong was, both in absolute terms and (more significantly) in relative terms. Hong Kong was British for 100-150 years and Chinese for 2000, while Gibraltar has now been British for 310 ...


4

I find interesting that many answers just belong to "armchair generals" that point only to the military power, logistics, *1 but forget to mention the issues that could lead to a war in the first place. Remember, war is the continuation of politics.... First of all, I would point the main issue would be noticing how these issues affect the internal ...


3

Another viewpoint, different from the other answers of "Britain could defend Gibraltar but not Hong Kong" is, who would we return it to? Hong Kong was / is by and large made up a Chinese or cultural Chinese populace, with no real ties / history to the UK. Gibraltarians on the other hand, whether the Spanish agree or not, see themselves as British, not ...


4

One other aspect to this discussion is water. Once the UK had returned the leased territories (as they would have had to do), all China needed to do was turn off the tap supplying water to the rest of HK. (Where do you think it came from?) It is unlikely that the rest of HK would have lasted more than a few days - no tanks (yes, I did see the pun) needed. ...


15

Gibraltar was defensible, but Hong Kong was not. In the 1990s, the distance from the UK would have made Hong Hong impossible to defend. Also, Hong Kong is primarily occupied by Chinese, unlike Gibraltar, which is occupied by UK citizens, many of whom are soldiers. Gibraltar is a fortress, and it is relatively close to the UK and hence easily suppliable. ...


58

Despite common misconception, both Hong Kong Island and the Kowloon Peninsula were ceded to the United Kingdom in perpetuity, via the Treaty of Nanking and the Convention of Peking, respectively. London was under no legal obligation to return them to China. However, most of the Crown Colony of Hong Kong actually consists of the New Territories. That was ...


1

One thing that seems to have been overlooked here is that between the time of Trafalgar (1805) and 1914, the Royal Navy was the only outfit that could guarantee the safe passage of trade anywhere. After the War of Independence the fledgling USA needed RN protection to get goods in and out. Aside from the time of the war of 1812 the USA thus clung to the ...


1

Britain and the United States were at loggerheads as late as the Civil War (1860-65), and perhaps even shortly thereafter. They became allies around the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries. This was because of the rise of the Eurasian "Heartland," and of the so-called "Heartland Theories" put forth by people like Britain's HJ MacKinder (in 1904), and his ...


3

It is perhaps not strictly accurate to say warrant officers were appointed by the Board of Admiralty. In general, they actually received their warrants from the Navy Board, which was the Royal Navy's administrative body until it was merged into the Admiralty in 1832. The Navy Board kept records of candidates for a warrant. When a vacancy opens up on a ship, ...


7

An almost categorical no, but I stick with a hardly. As Rajib pointed the war as a complex system, and one single variable not decide the entire destiny, and note the entire British contribution to defeat Germany was not that big. The Red Army [...] defeated 75%–80% of the German land forces (Wehrmacht and Waffen-SS) deployed in the war. Wikipedia So, ...



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