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19

The name is Waldo C. Moore. This page says that he was a check collector: Moore sent famous people a request for an autographed bank check for one cent that was accompanied by his signed one-cent bearer note drawn on The Peoples Banking Company, Lewisburg, Ohio. Moore sent this request to hundreds of celebrities and his appeal received a surprisingly ...


7

They didn't end up in any one particular place. In more recent decades, discovered skulls are generally returned to Japan, or disposed of in various ways (lack of identification). Certainly at least some would have been gotten rid of (through burial or otherwise) since WW2 was still ongoing. American authorities did not officially approve of the practise. ...


7

It seems to me that the Democratic Party was not named per se. Instead, it gradually settled upon its present name more or less between 1824 and 1844. As is well known, the original Republican Party largely collapsed into personality-centric factions after 1824. The resulting fledgling parties, however, continued to profess membership in the old Republican ...


6

In his 1827 home medical group, the doctor Thomas J. Graham wrote that: It is a common practice among Europeans in sultry climes to eat plentifully of either fresh or salt meat, at breakfast, tiffin, and dinner; this practice is followed day after day, and my only surprise is, that such a dangerous course of living does not produce a much greater ...


6

Definitely by 1844, since their platform for that year speaks of "the Democratic party of this Union." (By comparison, the platform for 1840 makes no such reference, which may imply that in that year it wasn't yet the official name.) Actually, looking further, here are the proceedings from their national convention of 1840, labeled the "National Democratic ...


6

The build up of the US army from a small, backwards, underfunded, isolationist peace-time army in 1939 to a six million person world conquering colossus in 1945 is one of the under-appreciated triumphs of WWII. Much can be attributed to the cadre of professional, forward thinking officers like George Marshall the US maintained. When it comes to tanks, it ...


5

You are not going to find these statistics. I put the evidence for this “below the fold.” Basically, crime stats experts all say that crime stats are unreliable before the mid-20th century. However, I think private trips must have been robbed at much higher rates than commercial trips for the simple reason that the vast majority of highwaymen operated in ...


3

They way that was phrased should be ringing bells right off the bat. The USA has a long and proud history of having tall tales (iow: outrageous lies) made up about opposing politicians. As a man who split and refounded the Democratic Party, and the first President from a "western" state, Andrew Jackson had more than the typical share of political opponents. ...


3

I doubt native faiths were discussed much. The Founding Fathers would have considered American Indian's First Amendment rights to be a non-issue because Indians were not recognized as citizens unless they were of at least half European ancestry. In fact, judges could cite native religion as the reason why Indians were denied the rights and protections of ...


2

The granddaddy of them all, George Washington became Senior Officer of the United States Army from July 1798 until his death in December 1799. He would have been Commander-in-Chief of armies raised had the Quasi-War progressed further. It's definitely a regular and permanent government role, though not civilian like the others.


2

Retail Banking: There were not national retail banks until the 1980s, due to state and federal restrictions on branch banking and interstate banking. The history of Bank of America is instructive here. After California allowed in-state branching in 1909, BoA opened 453 branches in California by 1929. Attempts to open up branches out of state led to a series ...


2

Not sure if the qualify but the Asheville and Natchez were River Class frigates building in Canada in 1942, for the RN and RCN, transferred while still building under Reverse Lease Lend to the USN. If they qualify there were also a number of Modified Flower corvettes transferred while building. Others?


2

I'm surprised I'm the first to suggest this, and this is probably a bit of a stretch, but with Covington being right on the border between slave and free states, could this have marked a stop on the underground railroad? I know the construction date of the building was stated as 1900-ish so would be too new, but it mentions the concrete in the back basement ...


2

There was always the possibility of a division or squadron acting independently. For example, the Americans learned, the hard way, that their destroyer squadrons were best allowed to attack independently in night surface actions. The squadron staff would prepare plans for this. The staff were not large below the task force level. An added four or five ...


1

No, they didn't. From their point of view there was now a hostile anti-South majority in Congress. Any attempt by themselves to do things to protect slavery through US Congressional action was doomed to failure. So there was no reason to bother trying. The closest thing they had was allied Copperheads, Northern Democrats who felt the issue wasn't worth ...


1

The actual trigger point wasn't a Senate Majority (which was given up in 1850), but rather a more general sense of increasing "containment" by the South. Early in the life of the country, the slave/free balance remained even because there was land suitable for both to expand. 1848 and the War with Mexico added some land, but this land had no slaves and ...


1

Cruisers, and other ships, were organized into groups, or divisions, that fought as a unit. Here was a U.S. naval [Order of Battle].1 This had little to do with sending such ships on "detached duty." These ships fought as units, or divisions with a given fleet (as they would in an "army,") and had division staffs administering them.


1

The UN(United Nations) is a "upgraded version" of what U.S. president Woodrow Wilson and his 14 points had established after the first world war, the: League of Nations, that was expected to keep the peace, and obviously failed. That being said the role of UN was again to keep the peace. The Cold War had a greater impact on the UN since the former allies ...


1

Looking further into the other answers, it does seem that weather and diet were closely linked in the minds of many 19th century writers. Thomas Graham (see Semaphore's answer) may have been important in disseminating the belief that vegetables were most beneficial in hot climates, as this begins showing up elsewhere by the end of the century. For example, ...


1

I am not sure if it is the first recognition of healthiness but about the end of age of discoveries, sailors started to realize if they bring sour cabbage with them, they can prevent various diseases. Or better to say some diseases are just don't show up on their ship for the long trip. In those times they knew nothing about Vitamin C, and most of diseases ...


1

In the past there was a great diversity of opinions about what constituted a good diet and you can certainly find examples of people who deprecated, for example, vegetables. However, this was not typical. Overall, the most common recommendations were to eat a variety of food, and to eat less food. Many physicians going forward from Galen recommended the ...


1

I conjecture that this was an empirical result deduced from experience with long distance sea voyages. Scurvy was a real disaster in many long expeditions. Seaman began the dietary experiments to fight scurvy in 18-th century (or maybe earlier, I just do not know the earlier records). At first they tried sauerkraut. The lemon juice was introduced to the ...


1

Not only was it legal, but until the 1820s workers across the country expected their employers to pay them part of their wages in whiskey. The wage labor system was not yet well developed. Instead, historians like Paul Johnson refer to a "household economy" in which apprentice and journeymen mechanics were treated as members of the household of the master ...


1

None that were taken seriously. Why? Because modern life isn't so linked to the Sun that you can't be an hour off, and because more time zones mean more people having to live and work across those borders every day. It is so disorienting that some places have changed their time zone to be the same as whomever they do the most business with. This (partly) ...


1

Short Answer: Cricket was surprisingly popular in the United States through the entire 19th century. However, baseball was backed and promoted by dynamic marketers like A.G. Spalding. Baseball came to be associated with all-American manly athleticism, while cricket came to be associated with snobbish aristocrats with English pretensions. Sociologists Jason ...



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