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15

Oh, but it is in the Constitution - implicitly. The it "isn't anywhere in the constitution" argument is frequently popular to different groups on different topics, but in this case at least has no legal basis in jurisprudence. The judicial Power of the United States, shall be vested in one supreme Court ... The judicial Power shall extend to all Cases, ...


12

Attacking targets in ports is the least productive way of using your ships for at least two reasons: 1) The damage you do can be easily repaired and 2) the chances of your own ships getting "caught" or sunk are the highest. The Japanese found this out at Pearl Harbor. All but one of the ships that they sunk were raised from the sea and recycled. (Only the ...


7

From Wiki with references there: The program engaged in many illegal activities;[3][4][5] in particular it used unwitting U.S. and Canadian citizens as its test subjects, which led to controversy regarding its legitimacy.[3] Some of the methods: administration of drugs (especially LSD) and other chemicals, hypnosis, sensory deprivation, ...


7

Because it would have been suicidal and unproductive. The bulk of the German U-boat fleet barely had enough range for operations in North America at all. They did things like filling water tanks with diesel just to get enough range to hunt convoys. The bigger, less maneuverable Type IX did have better range, but they were also clumsier and more detectable. ...


6

The only ships the Germans could get to the US coast were U-Boats. These had small guns and no armor. A Coast Guard cutter could tear one to pieces. A 50 caliber machine gun hole could make the U-Boat unable to submerge again. So they stayed just outside the port and sunk ships, until the US started convoying and escorting the merchant ships. The sunk ...


5

@Oldcat has the core of the answer. Judicial review was not part of the constitution. The constitution says very little about the judicial branch beyond the assertion that we should have one and the implication that it should be independent of the legislative and executive branch. The constitution mandates only one court, and doesn't say anything about how ...


5

It seems the key word I should've been looking for is "Christian Slavery". E.g. this NYT article says: Southern Christians believed that the Bible imposed on masters a host of obligations to their slaves. Most fundamentally, masters were to view slaves as fully members of their own households and as fellow brothers and sisters in the Lord. Therefore, as ...


5

What the other answers are missing is a clear explanation of why it is dangerous for a sub to enter a harbor. The reason why a sub cannot normally enter a harbor, like Boston Harbor or New York Harbor, is that they are shallow, confined areas. New York Harbor is about 50 feet deep. Boston Harbor is even more shallow, less than 20 feet in many places. It has ...


4

(At least one U boat ventured up into Canadian waters, but there doesn't seem to have been much damage.) The advantage of U-boats was their stealth, but when they were detected then countermeasures could be taken. When attacking a US port, their location would have been easy to narrow down, and there would be massive allied firepower nearby. Far easier, and ...


4

Oldcat already answered for the naval aspects. There were also plans to obtain a long-range strategic bomber that would be capable of striking the contiguous United States from Germany. From Wikipedia: The Amerika-Bomber project was an initiative of the German Reichsluftfahrtministerium, to obtain a long-range strategic bomber for the Luftwaffe that ...


4

According to Gannon's book, Operation Drumbeat and a quote from U-123 commander Lieutenant Captain Reinhard Hardegen, from the article Sharkes in the Water, the issue that most deterred U-boats from entering American harbors was that they did not have detailed charts of the harbor and feared running aground. Hardegen said they neither went aground near New ...


3

It is pretty hard to prove a negative in the social sciences (consider how many people still believe the The Protocols of the Elders of Zion hoax!) but I would bet that Brzezinski never said anything like that - this is an extremely stupid thing to say, and I don't think he is that stupid. The "New world order" was the expression used by Bush-1 to describe ...


3

The reason why your source does not give the starting location (Los Angeles) is because it took him months to do it due to weather and other delays, so the arrival notification just included the final legs: The Brooklyn Daily Eagle Almanac, 1912 Robert G. Fowler (Wright Model B), started from San Francisco for New York Sept. 11, 1911, reaching Colfax, ...


3

Plutarch, writing about 100 AD, in his "Lives of the Noble Greeks and Romans" has a commentary about the Roman Cato the Elder who recommended working slaves hard and selling them off when they became unable to work. He critiques this as being inhumane and immoral, saying that slaves should be cared for after their life of service. So humanizing slavery ...


3

Swing music and swing dancing peaked in popularity around World War II. The war made it difficult to assemble a big band, and there were musicians' strikes in 1942 and 1948. A lot of jazz also started to become less danceable; this started with bebop and continued with Coltrane and West Coast Jazz. Starting around 1955, rock and roll started to be heard on ...


2

Any substantial reform of the endemic corruption engaged in by both major parties, from Atlanta to the Pecos, would most likely of resulted in vastly larger number of Blacks being able to vote. Prior to the Civil Rights era ushered in during the Kennedy administration, this was not a result desired by either party (in the South). In consequence, neither ...


2

I'm not sure I agree with your premise at all. Dance has never 'gone out of style'. Sure ballroom dancing has. What were discos of the 70's and 80's if not group synchronized dancing? Now we still have raves and clubs. Even in the age of indie rock, there was still mosh pit's and club dancing. Dancing in the big band era was different than that in the 1800's ...


2

Starting in 1776 and continuing through the end (!) of the Civil War, there was a gradual evolution in the institution of slavery in the US. Some of the changes could possibly be described as making slavery more "humane," although that's not necessarily the word I'd use. Slave marriages were not legally recognized, and were initially discouraged. But when ...


1

I think you are being misdirected by the theatre of politics. It works like this. Somebody does something "against" the leader. The underlings and sycophants make a noise about it, as they must. The leader takes it in their stride, rises above and appears more statesman-like. So, from my recollection, the answer is that it had a positive effect on ...


1

Although the article on the Cuban missile crisis at Wikipedia cites John T. Correll's article from the August 2005 issue of Air Force Magazine as saying that the Soviets had possibly only 4 operational ICBMs in October 1962, the record has changed as more and more documents come to be declassified. According to Robert S. Norris' presentation at the Wilson ...


1

I had explained that judicial review was not a power invented in 1803, but rather an established legal practice. This has been questioned ("The power is not in the constitution, and was not, to the best of my knowledge, discussed in the formation of the constitution."); since I'm apparently not allowed to edit my first answer, I thought I'd address the ...


1

Your description accurate enough. The US Constitution is a broad document and does not have paragraphs for every little action that the government does. It set up the Supreme Court, to have jurisdiction over all law cases appealed to them. When Marshall first used Judicial Review, it 'made sense' that if anyone were to decide that a Federal Law violated ...


1

To a Cuban, it looks like a "Spanish Cuban, (North) American" war. But to a (North) American, it looks like a war on several fronts against Spain, of which Cuba was one. Other battlefields included Puerto Rico, Guam, and the Philippines. To the American way of thinking, it was a transfer of Spain's (remaining) overseas empire to the rising Americans. ...


1

My first thought was that the legislative session for each one of these states ended right before July 1, however, a look at the National Conference of State Legislature's website showed that the legislature in each state adjourns at a different time, although these times could have been different in the late 60s. What appears most likely is that during the ...


1

Surprisingly, there does not seem to be a lot of information online about what changes took place after the 1948 election. This is probably because what little I could find suggests that not much changed. Texas has a history of distrust of centralized authority, and so strong local control over elections was the norm in 1948 and continued to be the norm ...


1

Courtesy of Billy Joel's Uptown Girl: I'm gonna try for an uptown girl She's been living in her white bread world As long as anyone with hot blood can And now she's looking for a downtown man That's what I am A white bread girl is of course a pampered suburban princess, while the Billy Joel's downtown man protagonist is clearly, by way of contrast, ...


1

We can go into these long winded discussions on Supreme Court decisions and the law about secession. A document that is more important than the Constitution is being overlooked. The Declaration of Independence. Does this not give a state the right to break away from a government that has become destructive to the people. What did we do when be declared ...



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