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53

First of all, Japanese Forces were by no means inferior to their enemies in terms of fighting spirit or training. Beyond a doubt, No nation in WW2 had soldiers of such fanatical devotion in her service as Japan did, who actively sought out Gyokusai (Glorious death). Their mindset could be explained in Japanese martial song, Umi Yukaba: If I go away to ...


22

How often were Jews barred from academic and social clubs in the early 20th century? Feynman's experience was hardly unique: At the turn of the twentieth century, quota requirements limited Jews’ matriculation in college and forced them to compete against one another for the few spots elite colleges had reserved for such students. At that time, Jewish ...


19

According to this article there have been three times when six presidents were alive at once. 1861 - Van Buren, Tyler, Fillmore, Pierce, Buchanan, Lincoln 1993 - Nixon, Ford, Carter, Reagan, Bush, Clinton 2001 - Ford, Carter, Reagan, Bush, Clinton, Bush jr There is a pretty good chance it will happen again in 2017: 2017 - Carter, Bush, Clinton, Bush ...


18

tl;dr: Common Law, inherited from Britain, says you're a citizen by right of birth or parentage... but a citizen of what? The principles of the US revolution imply your first obligation is to your society (ie. the people of your state). When your state changes its allegiance, so do you. An analogy can be drawn to if your state rewrites its constitution: the ...


17

I wan to supplement NSNoob's answer with some more information on Japanese small arms. They lacked the firepower which the Americans could bring down, firepower which is very important in obscured and close range jungle fighting. Compared to the Chinese, their primary land opponent, the Japanese army fared fine. This is something very important to remember, ...


11

Japan had a disadvantage in heavy equipment, especially artillery and ships artillery. Many Japanese soldiers were killed in heavy bombardments. After the early battles (e.g. Guadalcanal), Japan seldom bombarded or bombed American soldiers. In some ways, the Japanese casualty rate was not that much higher than that of the Americans. If you take casualties ...


6

Neither. Reasons given for advocating the abolition of slavery usually were: 1) Slavery was a form of theft and totally wrong, unethical, evil and against the will of God. 2) slavery was bad for all white people except for the few actual slave owners. It enabled the slave owners to dominate, oppress, and impoverish the white southerners without their ...


6

My uncle was a Marine in these battles. His generation spoke very little about the war. He was in the Pacific. One day we were discussing wars. He turned to me and said, "You know we did not take prisoners...". There were many reasons for this. 1) There was no place to put or hold prisoners. 2) You had to be constantly on alert with Japanese prisoners since ...


4

In 1788, residents of the thirteen colonies would have been citizens of their state. The Constitution didn't go into effect until 1789. Furthermore, since the Constitution was ratified by the citizens of each state, not by the states, residents were citizens. (several states tried to have the Constitution ratified by the state government; that was not ...


2

I traced down the particular edit which added the phrasing, but couldn't find an explanation. This is a Wikipedia edit, not an authoritative source, so I wouldn't put too much thought into it. ... so let's put too much thought into it. It turns out it leads to some interesting background on the Three-Fifths Compromise. It could be a reference to a similar ...


2

So my question is, was the Abolition of Slavery in the United States perceived and advertised as an effort to improve race relations or an improvement to labour laws? Others have given sociopolitical answers, let me give a brief economic one. The ultimate reason for slavery's actual abolition was, at least according to the economic history, an economic ...


2

Hardly! I can't put my hand on it now, but I wrote an undergraduate paper on the genesis of US slavery, where I referenced the first documented sale of "Negros" in the American colonies in, I think, 1690. It was fairly obvious from this that it was their difference (perceived as "barbarian", "childlike" and of course non-Christian etc) that made their ...


2

During the Great Depression, arguably the most important problem was unemployment, which at its peak reached nearly 25% of the work force, or 11 million people. The start of World War II, solved that problem. By 1944-45, the U.S. armed forces reached 11-12 million in strength, roughly matching the maximum number of unemployed cited in the previous ...


2

Well, I think this question is quite controversial. However, APUSH loves to throw these questions at you to see what answer is MOST correct, rather than having a single correct answer. Although I do think this is a very bad question... the only explanation I could come up with was this: Washington expressed that he supports a ratification process, stating ...


1

Though it has been a couple of decades, here is the situation as it was in the U.S. Army (and as described by my several British officer acquaintances) at that time. To make Major in the U.S. Army, except in a very few specialty professional tracks (doctors, for instance), you NEED to have accomplished a tour as a company commander (or equivalent COMMAND ...



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