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24

The question I might have asked is, "Is the U.S. a Superpower today because of World War ONE?" And that's the question I'll answer. In 1914, the U.S. probably was not the strongest country in the world (perhaps third or fourth, no weaker than fifth). By 1918, the U.S. was the strongest country in the world, with Germany, Britain, France, and Russia having ...


12

The most persuasive answer to this that I have read recently can be found in "American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America" by Colin Woodard. It has been a few years since I read it, but if I remember correctly, he posits that different cultural patterns that were set in the first few generations of settlement got ...


6

I think that it will be impossible to provide the kind of data you want, but we can approximate an answer. A google search on "Decline of Christianity in Britain" will reveal multiple articles by eminent Britons that agree that Christianity is declining. Lord Carey thinks soAmericans think so. The Telegraph thinks so. The same search repeated for the USA ...


4

It's hard to not include possibly biased views or controversial arguments when answering such a question. But considering the vague nature of the question, there will be no definite answer anyhow. Apart from the fact that one can not give a strict definition of the term "superpower", there is no single chain of causalities between a global event like WWII ...


4

The answer appears to be "yes" in both cases: Tariffs in United States history: In the colonial era, before 1775, nearly every colony levied its own tariffs, usually with lower rates for British products. There were taxes on ships (on a tonnage basis), import taxes on slaves, export taxes on tobacco, and import taxes on alcoholic beverages. The ...


4

To make a long story short, it appears as though two things happened: A man convicted of the death penalty gave a moving speech (or perhaps sang a hymn) which convinced the crowd that capital punishment was a travesty. At roughly the same time, Canada put a Detroit resident to death for a crime which was later confessed to by another man on his death bed. ...


4

Wikipedia's page on conscription actually gives a pretty good breakdown. In WWII, males between 18 and 64 were required to register, but the selections were limited by executive order on December 5, 1942 from from 21–45 to 18–38. Assuming the citation (George Q. Flynn, The Draft, 1940–1973) is correct, 50 million men from 18 to 45 were registered. The ...


3

This is a great question, since many middle school text books are using this framing. I'm partial to NC: Who own's the land? The traditional view of European-Indian land deals is that Europeans tricked the Indians, who failed to understand the consequences of their actions....English colonists rarely, if ever, forcibly displaced an Indian village or took ...


3

And your question? your source clearly stated it was created, as a radio telegraphy service, in 1938. An undersea cable wasn't laid, as the same source states. And by the time telegraph cables were already being replaced by wireless telegraphy services (or radio telegraphy as the Americans called it). Wikipedia states that the first cable from the US across ...


3

This is a really complicated question. I will try to be brief. In order to discuss corn its relevant to discuss other major crops. The reason is that farmers choose to grow things that will compliment another thing to prevent soil erosion and lower costs. In North America, fields are often planted in a two-crop rotation with a nitrogen-fixing crop, often ...


3

The Spanish-American War took place in 1898. Cuba became independent only in 1902. History records February 24, 1895 as the date, when the (preceding) Cuban War of Independence began. The latter war turned into the former when America intervened. If one were to refer to the Spanish-Cuban-American War instead of Spanish-American-War, others could perhaps ...


2

traditionally, Europeans were told what to believe in, Americans came to American to believe in things of their own choosing. Of course this is not wholly the case any more, many European countries are as religiously liberal as the US are now. But a strong monoculture exists in those countries still, with the majority of churches being of a specific ...


2

It is almost certainly selection bias. In fact, a dialect humor that resembles today's "Lolcat" was all the rage as comedy and Lincoln used to read it before cabinet meetings: HIGH-HANDED OUTRAGE AT UTICA - Artemus Ward In the Faul of 1856, I showed my show in Uticky, a trooly grate sitty in the State of New York. The people gave me a cordyal ...


2

Naming conventions can seem a bit weird. For example, here in the States we know the Seven Years' War (well, to the extent that we know it at all) as the French and Indian War because... it was fought between the French and... the English, with various Native American tribes joining in on the French side. Southern sympathizers liked to call the American ...


2

Hmm. That's a tricky one for many reasons, which I'll hope to elucidate: One bit of "low hanging fruit" you may want to explore first is taking a look at publications such as Time, Life, and Newsweek at your local library. While you're unlikely to find every gubernatorial, Senate, or House candidate there, you'll likely find pictures of some of the major ...


2

Interesting question! I can't say for actual averages and all, but I can explain how this worked and the factors affecting both people. I do know that with livestock, open grazing was done, taking them out to what pasture you can find. So probably lots of communal grazing too. But you probably want to know how much land they owned for themselves to crop. ...


1

I have read someone referred to phenomena such as this as the American anti-pattern[1]. He asserts that in the US, an initially slight advantage to a particular group tends to be exploited. The exploiting group uses this to reinforce itself. Even though this later causes a problem, the group already has a strong advantage and can use their influence to ...


1

In speaking about preliminary medical certification, there are a few elements to consider: education, ethics codes, promotion of evidence based medicine and licensing. Education Setting standards for education was the first undertaking, because through doing this it develops the idea of what is a "doctor" and what is not. The first American medical school ...


1

It's a negative number; the bombs were militarily unnecessary to secure the Japanese surrender. The US Strategic Bombing Survey, released 1946, estimated that: Based on a detailed investigation of all the facts, and supported by the testimony of the surviving Japanese leaders involved, it is the Survey's opinion that certainly prior to 31 December 1945, ...


1

It is not selection bias. Types of writing should be compared only against a comparable type of writing, controlling for the education and social class of the author, using comparable methods to a proper cross-sectional analysis. This is commonly done and then the text is placed into a software program to create a text analysis, so there this an ...


1

In addition to the lend-lease reasons given by others, Japan had declared war on Britain at the same time as it declared war on the United States. Japan including the British Empire on the war declaration against the United States had to be reciprocated on the German side of the alliance with a declaration of war against the United States (since Britain and ...



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