Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

14

It depends on what you consider worse. Time magazine lists an incident that occurred on December 18 1970 at Yucca Flat Nuclear Test site where radioactive debris from the underground test of a 10 Kiloton Nuclear detonation was vented into the surrounding atmosphere. However the Department of Energy stated afterwards that the 86 workers who were exposed did ...


11

Felix Frankfuter, before his SCOTUS appointment, was the founder of the ACLU, and an avid New Dealer. As such, the quote doesn't sound at all like him, or at least not the way its being used. He was just not a guy who thought about government in that way. For reference, here are some documented quotes from him about how he believes the USA operates. Both in ...


10

The Soviets did not know they were supplying the CIA, because Americans are adept at corporate shenanigans. From the book Skunk Works: A Personal Memoir of my Years at Lockheed: Our supplier, Titanium Metals Corporation, had only limited reserves of the precious alloy, so the CIA conducted a worldwide search and using third parties and dummy ...


8

This is a massive case of historical irony and ignorance or worse from Ali Muhammad Ali changed his name from what he called his 'slave name' Cassius Clay when he converted to Islam, the religion that sold his ancestors into slavery from Africa. He got his name 'Cassius Clay' because his Christian father was given the name in honor of the Caucasinman who ...


7

I suppose you could consider Castle Bravo to be a 'nuclear accident.' While we did intend to nuke the atoll, we didn't intend the blast to be anywhere nearly as large as it was, contaminate islands more than 100 miles away, or irradiate a Japanese fishing boat. If you count Castle Bravo, it's almost certainly the largest in U.S. history, much worse than ...


7

Hard to say, military-related nuclear incidents tend to be classified. But I'll wager a guess as to why New York Times felt the need to specify TMI was the worst commercial nuclear incident: Commercial nuclear facility operators generaly operate under the supervision of International Atomic Energy Agency. Among other things, this agency defines an ...


5

Chiefly I believe because those people were not from Virginia, and had thus never been directly ordered by anyone to comply. Generally the way these things work is that when the SCOTUS makes a decision on a local case that clearly applies nationwide, lower court justices nationwide will start using their interpretation of that decision in their own ...


5

Yes. SL-1 is estimated to have resulted in a release of about four to five times as much I-131. SL-1 may have been made public because the scale and location of the event made it difficult to hide. It may also not have been considered sufficiently sensitive to warrant extreme secrecy, unlike projects such as aircraft nuclear propulsion.


5

When in doubt - check the Oxford English Dictionary: (Compact Edition, Vol. I, p. 1174) Crimp: 3 An agent or contractor for unloading coal ships: a contractor. Obs 1700 B. E. Dict. Cant. Crew, Crimp: one that undertakes to unload a ship of coals 1754 STRYPE Stowe's Survey: II v 319's: Any Coal Owner may employ crimps or Factors, not being lightermen ...


4

A "boat crimper" is synonymous with a "boot crimper" - a person who specializes in manufacturing and repairing boots. The process of crimping is used to make leather conform to shapes that can't be created with folding, and involves stretching wet leather over a form with clamps or pliers. You can get an idea of what is involved here. A good example of the ...


4

A boat crimper was a member of a group of sailors whose job was to forcibly impress men into the Navy. They were often referred to as the press gang. The use of such gangs to force Americans into the British Navy was one cause of the War of 1812. For reference, look up the entry for "James Kelly (crimper)" in Wikipedia.


4

I think I may have found it. According to this British Magazine Article from 1820, crimping appears to have been something one would do with a fish, after having caught it. It doesn't go into detail, but I found another book that does: Hints for the Table, by John Timbs in 1859. It appears to be a method for preserving a fish by cutting it open and ...


4

Zinn's book is not so much a history as a collection of essays in chronological order. His book projects a modern left-wing view of events which often veers into distorted depictions that the original participants would have found barely recognizable. His facts are excellent and correct, but he omits key information and ends up portraying things in a false ...


4

Health researchers collected data on causes of death in 114 U.S. cities during the Great Depression. Their findings confirm the impressions of many observers in the 1930s, mortality did not increase during the Great Depression: They include a table that shows trends in death rates per 100,000 population. Starvation does not appear on the list, nor does it ...


4

There were electoral and administrative reasons for Lincoln to balance the ticket with a Democrat. He did legitimately fear that he might lose the election to McClellan, and Lincoln would do what it took to win. Lincoln did not much respect McClellan at this point. Furthermore, the Democrats had endorsed a peace plank at their convention. Thus Lincoln was ...


4

It's going to depend on how you define "nuclear accident" and how you define "worst." USS Thresher (SSN-593) went down with all hands in 1963. The cause (we think) was a significant sea-water leak (flooding casualty). The reactor was scrammed (emergency shut down), and without its main source of propulsion the submarine sank. Everyone on-board was ...


3

Hanford, right on the Columbia River which flows through my city of Portland, OR, is probably the largest non-commercial nuclear disaster in terms of cost and scale of environmental damage. Its a former top-secret nuclear processing facility for the US military. Hanford was used for decades for nuclear processing with nine reactors and five plutonium ...


3

The Demon Core was a 6kg sphere of Plutonium that was involved in two criticality incidents in the forties at Los Alamos, each time resulting in the death of the scientist involved in the experiment.


3

The New York Times article is undoubtedly referring to the deaths of Harry Daghlian and Louis Slotin. Since noone died in the Three Mile Island accident, the Daghlian and Slotin deaths could be considered worse accidents. There were also 2 deaths and a critical injury due to a non-nuclear chemical exposure at the Philadelphia Navy Yard in 1944 as part of the ...


3

If there were slaves with classical names, it would have been nothing unusual. Consider that when Joel Chandler Harris named his famous narrator--a kindly, folksy, former slave--Harris chose the name Uncle Remus. There are slave narratives written by Lucius Henry Holsey and Octavia V. Rogers Albert. This will mentions slaves with the names Caesar, Bacchus, ...


3

A possibly related quote attributed to Frankfurter is: The real rulers of a nation are undiscoverable. He reportedly said this at a cocktail party after being asked who really runs the United States. This appeared in an article titled “Globalists Run U.S., Says Sen. Malone” appearing in the Chicago Daily Tribune, April 25, 1949, p. 1, as documented by ...


3

Nicholas Jeeves of the Cambridge School of Art addresses this question well in a lengthy essay: The Serious and the Smirk: The Smile in Portraiture. In this sense, a portrait was never so much a record of a person, but a formalised ideal. The ambition was not to capture a moment, but a moral certainty. Politicians were particularly sensitive to ...


2

The United States did not experience famine conditions during the Great Depression. Consider that a major economic problem during the Depression was that there was too much food. This "excess" supply made food too cheap, which bit into farmers' profits. To address the "problem" of overproduction, the government paid farmers not to plant crops: The ...


2

Federal courts do not have any direct power over state courts, they can only overturn their decisions and only when a case is appealed to the Federal court. The Supreme Court decision in Loving only nullified a Virginia law. To nullify an Alabama law, that law would have to be appealed to a Federal court as well. In practice, since the Alabama law may have ...


1

At the time Hitler declared war on the U.S. there was no existing plan for how to win it at all. In fact, based on all the information I have studied, I have come to the opinion that the timing of the whole thing was more about the German military situation in Russia at that moment. I really don't think Hitler had any plans of a serious German war effort ...


1

President Hoover created the President's Organization on Unemployment Relief (POUR) in 1931 to generate private contributions to aid the unemployed, but by mid-1932 it closed from a lack of funds. He endorsed a few public works programs like the Grand Coulee Dam in Washington to employ laborers. The Hawley-Smoot Tariff also raised import duties on foreign ...


1

Cassius Clay was not a name "given" to slaves; it was the name of a famous abolitionist, in whose honor the subject's father was named. The boxer was his son, hence Cassius Clay, Jr. "Muhammad Ali", as he preferred, considered his birth name a "slave name" because it was the type of name which ex-slaves adopted. The original Cassius Clay and his brother, ...


1

In regards to the French government, they had been informed well in advance by their ambassador in Berlin In The Gathering Storm Churchill writes (in Chapter 20, The Soviet Enigma): From the moment when Molotov became Foreign Commissar, he pursued a policy of an arrangement with Germany at the expense of Poland. It was not very long before the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible