Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

The earliest I could find was by a John R. Norris in 1957 for a radio earpiece: There are a lot of behind-the-ear headphone/microphone combos, but that's not quite what you're asking about. The first dedicated behind-the-ear headphone I found was Simeon Schreiber's 1988 "Bone Conduction Audio Listening Device and Method": But importantly, the first patent ...


5

What the current Wikipedia entry says on this is accurate and succinct: In the United States religious activities of cults are protected under the First Amendment, however cult members are not granted any special protection against criminal charges. In other words, no law is allowed in the USA that abridges anyone's right to join a religion of their ...


4

Note that the first Congressional nominating caucus was in 1796, and was only to select a VP nominee. Thus the "King Caucus" system really only operated for POTUS candidates for 6 election cycles (1800-1820). In the USA, the presidential election is essentially a set of separate elections where every state simultaneously votes for its state's choice of ...


4

. . . . The election of 1824 brought an end to both the Democratic-Republican-dominated “era of good feeling” and the use of a congressional caucus as a nominating device. Although the Democratic- Republican caucus nominated William Crawford of Georgia as its candidate, three other candidates (John Quincy Adams, Henry Clay, and Andrew Jackson) ...


3

My answer is that there was no such umbrella term in common use in the 1800s that corresponds directly to our "Hispanic" or "Latino" category. I think T.E.D.’s answer is correct in that people with Mexican origins were called Mexicans. And if you lived in an area where most people who have Spanish names were of Mexican descent, then residents may have ...


3

There are isolated instances of flag desecration in America's colonial and revolutionary past, but the perpetrators were not especially influential. From Robert Goldstein's "The Great 1989-1990 Flag Flap: An Historical, Political, and Legal Analysis", published in the University of Miami's Law Review, p. 37: Although a scattering of flag desecration ...


2

It is difficult to make exact estimates because reliable figures from different publishers making the same book are hard to come by, especially in the case of pirated editions, which were rampant at that time. The popularity of Uncle Tom's Cabin has been somewhat exaggerated and there were many publications that compare to it. For example, if you include ...


1

Probably not. It's impossible to prove a negative like this, so this answer is necessarily inferential. Let's start by looking at Franklin's letter: Benjamin Franklin to John Bartram London, Jan. 11, 1770. My ever dear Friend: I received your kind letter of Nov. 29, with the parcel of seeds, for which I am greatly obliged to you. I cannot ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible