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28

The question I might have asked is, "Is the U.S. a Superpower today because of World War ONE?" And that's the question I'll answer. In 1914, the U.S. probably was not the strongest country in the world (perhaps third or fourth, no weaker than fifth). By 1918, the U.S. was the strongest country in the world, with Germany, Britain, France, and Russia having ...


23

This is a matter of very hot debate. It depends on what assumptions you make about what would have happened in the future. But there are two basic scenarios: The bombings saved somewhere in the neighborhood of 250 - 500 thousand US lives, and Japanese lives in the millions. The bombings saved US lives numbered only in the thousands, and actually cost the ...


22

Hiroshima, the first city, was "an important army depot and port of embarkation in the middle of an urban industrial area. It is a good radar target and it is such a size that a large part of the city could be extensively damaged. There are adjacent hills which are likely to produce a focussing[sic] effect which would considerably increase the blast damage. ...


20

The U.S. likely did not target Tokyo for the atomic bomb strikes as it was the seat of the Emperor and the location of much of the high ranking military officers. These are precisely the people you do not want to kill if you want to negotiate a surrender, as they are the people you would be negotiating with. The U.S. decided to drop the bombs onto military ...


15

The United States is a federation where, in theory, the States delegate certain powers to the federal government (USG) which they could not effectively exercise individually (such as defense), while reserving all other powers to themselves and the people. Due to reserved powers, internal matters like labor regulations would generally fall under State ...


14

Perhaps this is a generational thing? As a Gen-X'er, I grew up hearing about things like the Bataan Death March, The Rape of Nanking, and how in general the Japanese didn't feel like adhering to the Geneva Conventions, (as dramatized in Bridge over the River Kwai, among other movies and books). When I was a kid we also had lots more Pacific Theater veterans ...


14

I believe this is referring to the gag rule (aka: Pickney Resolution 3) of the US House, adopted in 1836. It read: Resolved, That all petitions, memorials, resolutions, propositions, or papers, relating in any way or to any extent whatever to the subject of slavery, or the abolition of slavery, shall, without being either printed or referred, be ...


13

The reason for battleship parts lying in Nevada Desert is (from nps.gov) : The gun barrel was taken off the Missouri during the Korean War (battleship guns were removable) when the ship was refurbished. The gun barrel was put into storage at the Naval Weapons Depot at Hawthorne, Nevada, for possible re-use aboard another battleship. But it was ...


12

The phrasing is a bit unfair, I think (and probably a misquote, as it turns out). The first important international patent agreement didn't exist until 1883, and the United States signed on 4 years later. Before that, all countries were free to discriminate against foreigners in patent applications. Even with that agreement, a person wanting patent ...


12

American Wasteland: A Social and Cultural History of Excrement,1860-1920 By Daniel Max Gerling, B.A.; M.A. Dissertation Presented to the Faculty of the Graduate School of The University of Texas at Austin in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy The University of Texas at Austin: Although Gayetty’s Medicated ...


12

The most persuasive answer to this that I have read recently can be found in "American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America" by Colin Woodard. It has been a few years since I read it, but if I remember correctly, he posits that different cultural patterns that were set in the first few generations of settlement got ...


11

You betcha! In fact, the movie was rather mild. The most famous incident in the Congress (comprising the Senate and the House of Representatives) was the caning of Senator Sumner: Walking cane used in beating Sen. Charles Sumner. Old State House Museum in Boston MA. Via Wikimedia Commons Lithograph by John L. Magee (1856). Via Wikimedia Commons On ...


10

You might want to reivew the history of the NATO alliance, Charles De Gaulle, and the special relationship. In particular Immensely patriotic, de Gaulle and his supporters held the view, known as Gaullism, that France should continue to see itself as a major power and should not rely on other countries, such as the United States, for its national ...


10

Werner von Braun and Neil Armstrong met with each other several times over the course of their lifetimes. I am not yet certain if pictures were taken at any of these meetings, or where to find these photographs, but I do know that they met. The first time the two met was in, I believe, 1962, when Neil Armstrong and eight other astronauts-in-training visited ...


9

I wonder whether what you're recalling was the battle waged against Einstein by the Woman Patriot Corporation. The "corporation" was anti-suffragette in character, possibly anti-Jewish and certainly anti-communist and anti-pacifist. In 1932 the organisation filed a memorandum complaining about Einstein's return to the United States. They claimed, according ...


9

Diapers back then were not made of synthetic materials, and thus were not really a "consumer good". The first consumer disposable diaper did not come along until 1948 (right after the war). Instead, they were made of cloth, and were washed between uses. People of middle-class or better means typically had a service for this purpose. Much like a milk ...


9

In 1974 the PLO adopted what is called "The Ten Point Program". It is a program that outlines a phased plan for liberating all of Palestine. Liberating here means liberating it from Israeli rule. Obviously once all of Palestine has been liberated that means there is no Israel at all. If we take this at face value, that means that any compromise you make ...


9

Is this first time an initiative was taken for a state to change its name after becoming a state within the Union.? No, 1989 was not the first time. In 1947 a similar resolution was proposed and defeated in North Dakota. See below Origin of State Names Also see Somewhere in America: At least four times since the end of the Second World War - 1947, ...


9

Back in the days when women (let's be honest here, particularly middle to upper-class women) were not in the workforce, maternity leave was not much of an issue. It took until the 1990's when the changing demographics of the workforce, the increasing status of women, and the political parties in power, all aligned properly to allow for a push for maternity ...


8

Yes, there was such a bill, known as Indiana Pi Bill, but it was never approved by the State. You can find a very interesting article on the matter, written by Arthur E. Hallerburg, in the text of Proceedings of the Indiana Academy of Science. Search for the phrase House Bill No. 246 Revisited. The whole affair started in 1894, when American Mathematical ...


8

The Marine Corps is the United States' expeditionary force. As such, it must work in close concert with the Navy, which provides logistics and seaborne support for expeditionary activities - but it is explicitly its own branch of the armed services. It has a mission different from that of the US Army, which is mostly concerned with large-scale combined-arms ...


8

There are three big questions there, with the second, on profitability of the colonies, a tricky one which can plunge us into discussion and the last, on why states bother, quite broad. Others may like to weigh in on them and I'll focus on your first part, "I have been told by many acquaintances that the loss of the thirteen colonies actually BENEFITED the ...


8

A quick Google search solves this question. Pausing at the tomb of Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette, he [John J. Pershing] was reputed to have uttered the famous line "Lafayette, we are here," a line spoken, in fact, by his aide, Colonel Charles E. Stanton. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_J._Pershing That statement cites ...


8

World War II was in progress - most of the men were busy elsewhere. While most of the workers were women (see above), there was no requirement to be a woman. See Rosie the Riveter Rosie the Riveter is a cultural icon of the United States, representing the American women who worked in factories during World War II, many of whom produced munitions ...


7

Ray Monk in Inside the Center: The Life of J. Robert Oppenheimer tells the story thus: Truman returned to Washington from Potsdam on the evening of 7 August and was immediately caught up in a whirlwind of activity generated by Groves, who was determined to proceed as quickly as possible with a second bombing of Japan. He and Admiral William ...


7

France has a lot of major (part) foreign weapons systems. It too operates E-3s, and prior to that E-2s for example. And many of the British systems are historically part British, developed either as joint ventures with other countries, produced under license in the US, or substitution British systems for part of the equipment in a system (the RAF's F-4 ...


7

The causus belli of the First Gulf War was the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait. President George (HW) Bush managed to get a series of UN declarations calling for the Iraqi troops to leave, and authorizing succesively more drastic actions to achieve this, culminating in 678, which authorized "all nessecary means". This provided a certian amount of international ...


7

The answer to the current question in the title, "Did people in antebellum Asheville N.C. own slaves?" would seem to be a clear yes. This is actually a remarkably topical question since Buncombe County (of which Asheville is the county seat) "has apparently become the first county in the country to digitize its original slave records" and put them online. ...


7

He believed that once we were free from British rule, we should no longer use British spellings. See NOAH WEBSTER & HIS WORDS, Houghton Mifflin Books for Children, 2012. It won the Golden Kite award for best NF book of 2012 in the U.S. It's for children, but packed with fascinating information on this most interesting of men. He talked with B. Franklin, ...


7

Wow - it would take me a long time to find the appropriate sources to answer this the way I want to. I also feel obliged to admit that I have an opinion on this topic, and I hope that @Samuel Russell or someone from the other side of the aisle will contribute to counterbalance me. @John Craven is correct that the great depression was a complex, global ...



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