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4

It was very rare. OP specifically asks about Montgomery. The passengers OP mentions are the only other passengers who were arrested there before Parks, according to History.com, this NPR story, and every other source I can find. However, outside of Montgomery there were protestors arrested for not giving up their seats going back to at least Irene Morgan in ...


1

This is answer was written by a woman named Gwendolyn as a response to another article The Real Roots of Southern Cuisine from deepsouthmag.com. I thought it would serve the same purpose here...Jamillah Comments regarding the African contribution to southern cuisine are greatly lacking in substance, truth, and in a basic understanding that the enslaved ...


0

Attitudes toward miscegenation were governed by two factors: 1) the degree of antagonism toward minorities and 2) the perceived "threat" posed by large minorities. The "North" (the former Union states) were the most tolerant to minorities. In the Northeast, the number of minorities was relatively large, but the degree of antagonism was small. In the ...


4

Yes, public opinion matches up with anti-miscegenation laws, except for along the Pacific Coast. First, let's look at a map of anti-miscegenation laws: So the northeast and north midwest had no such laws in the entire 20th century. The West mostly had these laws during the mid-20th century, but repealed them before the Loving decision in 1967. The entire ...


2

The bulk of the work had already been completed during Teddy Roosevelt's term in office, with the creation of: 4 National Game preserves 5 National arks 18 National Monuments 24 Reclamation Projects 51 Federal Bird Preserves 150 National Forests; and 230 Million total acres set aside for the enjoyment of all Modern sensitivities may disagree with Teddy's ...


0

This is not an objective question, but I can tell you that the idealist abolitionists were mainly liberal elitists living in Boston and New York. The average farmer types in Ohio, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, etc, opposed slavery on grounds of principle, but also wanted to put a stop to the importation of Africans into the country and wanted them out of the ...


1

There were no public opinion polls, so obviously it is impossible to get an exact estimate. One good data source, then, is elections. The Liberty Party was supported by abolitionists with moral objections to slavery. (This is opposed to the Free Soil Party, which as OP has noted garnered support from those more concerned with white labor than black slaves.) ...


-1

And if the south won the war there magically would have been a 'right' to secede. Can't we just admit this was settled by force and force is the number one determinant in whether a secession effort is valid. If the strength of the entity seeking to split off is such that it can win territory then it deserves that territory.


1

JimZipCode wrote a long and passionate answer which tries to debunk many of the other answers here and claim that the law was settled before the Confederate states seceded. He brings up some interesting points that should be debated. However, he also clearly goes too far. His choice of quotations is selective: I could just as easily come up with dozens of ...


8

There seem to be two major lines of reasoning here, both conjecture, because apparently Congress never explained itself. Arizona's state historian Thomas Edwin Farish wrote: For some reason, to this day unexplained, the greater portion of the land in this Arizona county [Pah Ute County] was ceded to the State of Nevada. The first line of reasoning ...


9

Yes. The perception in the Kennedy administration is that there was no alternative but to appoint pro-segregationist anti-civil rights district judges to most southern districts. Both Senators from the state in which a judge would serve must approve of the appointment before the full Senate even considers the appointment. Inevitably, then, district judges ...


-2

Sweden supplied war materials, especially ball bearings to both sides, why didn't Hitler declare war and cripple the Allies mechanized forces ? The day Hitler declared war on other Aryans to uphold a unworthy non Aryan ally like Japan, he wrote Germanys epitaph of doom.


1

On August 31, 1918, President Wilson wrote a letter to Rabbi Stephen Samuel Wise which referred to the Balfour Declaration and said in part: I welcome an opportunity to express the satisfaction I have felt in the progress of the Zionist movement in the United States... This letter was published a few days later, September 5th, 1918, in the New York ...


0

Smoking hemp, meaning Cannabis indica, was widely traded alongside tobacco in those days. Jefferson was very interested in agricultural products and collected them from all over the world. He would send large numbers of seed varieties to different farmers with whom he corresponded. He would have undoubtedly had free access to cannabis and many other drugs. ...


2

There are several meanings for "white plague", but the only one I've found that makes sense in this context is as a synonym for Tuberculosis (and some similar diseases that make the afflicted pale). The first vaccine for TB was used on humans during Wilson's tenure, so quite likely that (or some competing remedy) is what they are referring to. Albert ...


17

The "white plague" refers to tuberculosis. The incident, which captured the nation's imagination for one day, is described by this report from the Grizzly Bear Magazine, April 1914: 4000-MILE HIKE TO NATIONAL CAPITAL The Pacific Coast has done much to attract the attention of the world, but one of the most unique things that has been formulated ...


1

I originally thought it was because of best way to reduce number of coins needed before I read Semaphore's answer. I thought it was designed this way due to efficiency: for example at all values between 0 and 1 dollar that ends in 0 or 5 5 cent = 1 coin 10 cent = 1 coin 15 cent = 2 coins 20 cent = 2 coins (1 coin if using 5/10/20) 25 cent = 1 coin (2 ...


27

This is because Americans were used to dealing in quarters at the time the denomination was chosen. During the colonial period, a common unit of currency was one eighths of a Spanish real de a ocho. Since each of these Spanish dollars were worth eight Spanish reales it was habitual to divide the eight-real coin into 12.5% wedges known as bits. Two of these ...


2

For the most part they borrowed the money. A lot of the money was borrowed from France and Holland who were both eager to make trouble for the British. For example, in June of 1787 John Adams borrowed 1 million guilders from Holland on behalf of the Congress. The congress also issued a lot of domestic debt, notably bonds they called "loan-office ...


3

Good question - you have to dig past the superficial to understand, and I'm not fond of the way it is phrased, but the fundamental question is interesting. Here is one example: Having fought as a teenager in the French and Indian War, Robbins served in an Acton militia company at the end of the siege of Boston. Caesar Robbins became free during the war. ...


5

The Congress of the Confederation could "ascertain" and "appropriate" money from states or make "requisitions" on the States, as is stated in the Articles of Confederation: The United States in Congress assembled shall have authority . . . to ascertain the necessary sums of money to be raised for the service of the United States, and to appropriate ...


1

Here's a great map from the book German Seed in Texas Soil: Immigrant Farmers in Nineteenth-Century Texas by Terry Jordan: Page 33, visible on Google books, discusses this map in much greater detail.


2

Krauss (High Road to Promontory) notes that the Central Pacific had trouble keeping workers. Here's why: the railroad was being built through the mining regions of California (which was perfectly natural as the CP hoped to profit from shipping the ore). The CP would transport the workers from San Francisco up to the worksites. After a week of work, the ...



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