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1

I have been doing a study of military service in Hawkins County, TN. That is in East Tennessee, where sentiments were divided about the War. But in that county, a much lower percentage of men served than in the rest of the South. I started with the 1860 census and identified every white male between 14 and 45--these were the men who would have been in the 18 ...


0

I presume you are talking about the North, during the war itself. The newspapers shut down in those cases were invariably Copperhead newspapers that opposed the war, not slavery. It is true many abolitionists criticized Lincoln, but they were not arrested. For example, according to the "Report and Evidence of the Committee on Arbitrary Arrests in the State ...


2

Technically, the gap in the tapes was caused by Nixon's secretary, Rosemary Woods. But most people consider it unlikely that she would erase part of the tapes without the direction, or at least the consent of her boss. But here, the issue is one of the "slip between cup and lip." While Nixon is generally held responsible for the erasing of the tapes, he ...


6

There's a good chance he thought he did. There's actually an 18.5 minute gap in the tapes, about 3 days after the Watergate break-in. Of course that could have contained anything, including unrelated material. However, even sympathetic administration officials of the time now admit it was probably material that implicated him in the coverup of that ...


2

The electors were likely looking toward the future, anointing Hendricks as future (Vice) Presidential material. Hendricks was a Hoosier of national prominence who could help the Democratic Party make inroads into the North in 1876. Benjamin Brown retired from politics after the election, so there was no need for the electors to defer to him. And anyway, ...


2

It seems very unlikely. Why would Lincoln arrest men who, even if critical of the government, were even more critical of the slave states? My TLDR is that the majority of the arrests were of Southerners or Border Staters who, in some way, materially supported the Confederacy. The pattern of the arrests is entirely inconsistent with arrests for mere political ...


8

Both question and answer /comments appear very Americo-centric. I was born in 1949, just 2 years after the OP, and I cannot remember not knowing about the 2nd WW and the atrocities. We did not study the war at school, but as someone said, it was not "history" - it was our parent's and older siblings lived experience. Whilst the word "Holocaust" was not ...


-1

Another reason for this might be that many countries require all citizens to vote on election day. The US does not. Thus, an unmotivated voter in the US stays home whereas in other countries he might pull the lever for some random fellow.


16

It's probably because Ganson--one of the handful of Democrats who voted for the 13th Amendment--was on the fence about this Amendment himself. Voting not to reconsider the bill is similar to voting "present" in order to duck a difficult issue. First, Ganson voted against the 13th Amendment the first time the House considered it. He was widely expected to ...


9

Quite possibly for procedural reasons. There are a lot of little nits about parliamentary procedures that encourage weird things like this. For instance, under the older Roberts Rules of Order extant at the time, a motion to reconsider could only be made by someone who voted on the prevailing side in the previous vote. So if there's a chance the vote might ...


8

No, not even close. Alan T Nolan lists this as one of the components of the Lost Cause Myth in his essay "The Anatomy of the Myth", collected in the book The Myth of the Lost Cause and Civil War History (ed by Gary Gallagher and Nolan). McPherson says in Battle Cry that slavery was more firmly entrenched in 1860 than it had been in 1820. By 1860 the ...


8

There appears to be an explanation in the book Generations by (the late) William Strauss and Neil Howe. It has to do with kinds of people, specifically generations, that became teachers immediately after World War II. The older of these two was the so-called World War II generation. This generation provided the soldiers that beat the Nazis, but having ...


-1

Woodrow Wilson appears to have been for the Versailles Treaty at one point. Certainly, he was willing to let France have it as a quid pro quo for his other agendas, such as the League of Nations and "14 points" (with its rights of self-determination for Eastern Europe, and by implication, French and British colonies). It was "other," Republican leaders who ...


8

The White House, which had been occupied for only 14 years at this point, had been richly furnished with sofas, writing tables, commodes, card tables, and beds by Jefferson. The Madisons "inherited" these furnishings, and brought in their own personal possessions. So most of what was burned or looted (like the small medicine cabinet pictured below) was ...


12

The First World War and the Soviet Union happened. War time hysteria made labour groups and socialists, who were largely against the war, a target of vigilante attacks and political repression. To make matters worse, amid the political suppression internal divisions of the socialist movement spilled into the open. Encouraged by the revolutionary success in ...


3

Take a look at what happened after Saddam was disposed and you get the answer. Or take a look at what happened after the fall of Kadhafi. Those dictators, although certainly not good people, but stabilized their regions. From a political point of view this is what is important. In the case of Iraq it was especially important for the US as a stable Iraq was ...


4

The US was never close to reinstating conscription. This is popularly regarded (and probably correctly) to be political suicide for most elected representatives. However, the needs of the American military did push the volunteer recruitment system to its limits. The Army fell short of its recruitment goal by 5,000 people in 2005. The Army adjusted by raising ...


4

The decline of wagons was very gradual. They were displaced for long-distance movement of bulk goods starting in the 1820s and 1830s by the canal building frenzy sparked by the success of the Erie Canal. Canals were the cheapest way to ship bulk goods for a long time. By the 1840s, ocean-faring steamboats provided direct competition to wagons for ...


7

The decline of wagon trains in the United States started in 1869, with the completion of the first transcontinental railroad, and wagon trains as a way of migrating essentially ended in the 1890s. Covered wagons, on the other hand, stuck around for a long time. The covered wagon of the migrations evolved from freight wagons such as the Conestoga, and ...


1

Since World War 2, US became the strongest military power followed by Soviet Union. Before that, England and Germany were competing for the top position.


3

This will be a poor answer because I cannot locate my sources. Several years ago the Colonial Williamsburg podcast did a series of episodes on slavery and indentured servitude. One of the inflection points was Bacon's rebellion; after Bacon's rebellion there was a shift away from indentured servitude and towards stricter forms of slavery. Cultural, legal ...


0

It's true that slavery and indentured servitude were somewhat competitive, but it was NOT true that slavery was always preferred to indentured servitude. One major exception was the establishment of Georgia, by James Oglethorpe. It was founded on the indentured servitude of British prisoners (usually debtors), but Oglethorpe was actually against slavery. ...


5

There can be little doubt that indentured servitude decreased as reliance on slave labor increased. However, the dwindling supply of indentured European labor must be considered as at least one of the reasons American planters increasingly turned to an enslaved African labor force. Nonetheless, without the increased availability of enslaved Africans, ...


2

For the most part yes, as their fundamental issue in both cases was support for segregation and white supremecy. They were a bit different in theory, in that the AIP was founded as a conservative (far right) party that then courted southern whites, while the Dixiecrats were formed out of the southern Democratic party. However, in practice they both drew all ...


3

Pay huge amounts of money to invade some other country where there were no Americans. Huh? You are applying 2015 morals to 1800 America. In 1804, we did not have thousands of helicopters and ships with millions of tons of fuel just lying around and trillion dollar budgets for invading random countries. In 1804, the United States Navy only had 3 ships (USS ...


8

Realpolitik: American foreign policy under Washington, Adams, and Jefferson was aimed at threading the needle between England and France, avoiding European entanglements. Getting involved in Haiti would have angered at least one of them. Better to sit back and let the European empires expend their own resources. Also, intervention would have been ...


2

It'a a (partially) false premise. Cricket was popular with Americans (at least those with high social status) long after the Civil War. While the increasing popularity of baseball did present a formidable challenge to American cricket, the two games existed comfortably side-by-side throughout the 1850s and 60s. It was not uncommon, in fact, for ...


1

I'll offer an alternative theory: organized crime in the US was to a great extent the product of Prohibition. It had given them immense profits, and a network of well-bribed police & other public officials, since many people regarded ignoring Prohibition as almost a public duty. Once it was repealed, the crime syndicates had to redirect those resources ...


0

I think demographics played some part, too. Baseball was very popular in New York, even called at one time "The New York Game." With the large number of soldiers from New York serving in the Federal army, it was widely spread.


5

I feel that answers linking crime to ethnicity should at least try to provide some documentation relative to the ethnicity of union ranks. I would say that the factor more important was the use of organized crime (which existed before trade unions) to suppress worker movement. Organized was a more important force in USA than in UK. In the USA, the ...


0

Trade unions in North America were often dominated by immigrants, e.g. Sicilians, and later Russians, who had been members of organized crime syndicates in their home country, prior to immigrating. Trade unions in Britain were (mostly) dominated by "locals," who had no previous ties to organized crime.


8

I don't know if there is a proven definitive answer to this, but let me propose an explanation from first principles. At the time that Labour Unions were organizing in North America, and lobbying for legal recognition, careers such as teamsters and longshoremen were largely selected from the recently immigrated communities of Italians, Irish, and East ...


5

It was very rare. OP specifically asks about Montgomery. The passengers OP mentions are the only other passengers who were arrested there before Parks, according to History.com, this NPR story, and every other source I can find. However, outside of Montgomery there were protestors arrested for not giving up their seats going back to at least Irene Morgan in ...


1

This is answer was written by a woman named Gwendolyn as a response to another article The Real Roots of Southern Cuisine from deepsouthmag.com. I thought it would serve the same purpose here...Jamillah Comments regarding the African contribution to southern cuisine are greatly lacking in substance, truth, and in a basic understanding that the ...


0

Attitudes toward miscegenation were governed by two factors: 1) the degree of antagonism toward minorities and 2) the perceived "threat" posed by large minorities. The "North" (the former Union states) were the most tolerant to minorities. In the Northeast, the number of minorities was relatively large, but the degree of antagonism was small. In the ...


4

Yes, public opinion matches up with anti-miscegenation laws, except for along the Pacific Coast. First, let's look at a map of anti-miscegenation laws: So the northeast and north midwest had no such laws in the entire 20th century. The West mostly had these laws during the mid-20th century, but repealed them before the Loving decision in 1967. The entire ...


5

The bulk of the work had already been completed during Teddy Roosevelt's term in office, with the creation of: 4 National Game preserves 5 National parks 18 National Monuments 24 Reclamation Projects 51 Federal Bird Preserves 150 National Forests; and 230 Million total acres set aside for the enjoyment of all Modern sensitivities may disagree with ...



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