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2

As other answers have mentioned, there were state and local laws that prohibited alcohol before the Constitutional amendment. And there is the obvious fact that a Constitutional amendment is a more permanent measure than a normal law, which would require a more complex measure to overturn. (There may be a parallel to the moves in recent years to enshrine ...


12

Let me illustrate @StuartAllan's answer: if they hear "Japanese castle", people think about this: And while that is pretty and impressive, it will of course be a heap of smoking rubble after no more than a few hits from a battleship's guns. But what the attacking military is really up against is this: and laying waste to it is gonna take some time... ...


5

It looks like a stylisation in brick of the three golden globes of the pawn broker. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pawnbroker


23

This is probably a slightly garbled account of the destruction of Shuri Castle in Okinawa. During the Second World War's Battle of Okinawa, the battleship USS Mississippi shelled the historical Ryukyu palace for three days prior to its capture by US marines. At 0718 on May 25, the Mississippi began a murderous onslaught with her 5 and 14-inch guns that ...


6

I do not know of this incident. Check naval archives or with a librarian in naval archives. This does, however, seem highly likely. The castle itself would be a smoldering ruin (as it was almost entirely wood, designed in such a way to better absorb earthquakes). The stone/Earthwork, on the other hand, would be extremely resilient to artillery fire. Getting ...


2

A few Jews even became prominent slaveowning planters in the Old South ... as successful as these Jewish Southerners were by Southern standards, they represent a very tiny percentage of the 20,000 Jews residing in the antebellum South who could, or would, ever aspire to own a slave. About 5,000 Jews owned one or more slaves - about 1.25 percent of all the ...


2

The association with the 4th of July is relatively recent, starting in 1974 when the Boston Pops played it for a televised celebration of American Independence. The factor that cemented the work's association with Independence Day was its programming by Arthur Fiedler and the Boston Pops for their televised July 4th concert in 1974, replete with ...


0

As Oldcat said, no, Hitler had no plan for defeating the US outright. He didn't need to have one. It was enough that he believed that the Japan had one, and could carry it on up to victory. Thus, his declaration of war against the US was a strategic move, very similar to the declaration of war by the UK to Japan at about the same time. Churchill explains ...


1

To us, the Sedition Act may seem unthinkably contrary to American values. It did not seem this way to Federalists, so it should be no surprise that the Federalist majorities supported these bills. In fact, the Sedition Act seemed to many to be a liberal law: Ironically, the Sedition Act was actually a liberalization of the common law of seditious libel ...


0

The important thing to know is that the passage of the Alien and Sedition Acts represented the "high water mark" of the Federalist Party. Put another way, it rose and fell with these two acts. The Federalists had always controlled the Senate, and the 1794 Congressional elections gave them control of the House of Representatives. Finally, in 1796, John Adams ...


5

This occurred because there was essentially an active campaign to wipe out the great Bison ("Buffalo") herds that the plains Indians depended on to support their way of life (and thus their pushback against American settlement). It would have come to an end during the 1880's, as by then there were only a few hundred Bison left. Sighting one from the rail ...


1

One of the important - and rarely mentioned - differences between serfs and slaves is that former, at least in Russian Emprie, could carry guns. And as the famous quote states, "The possession of arms is the distinction between a freeman and a slaves". Of course, I'm not claiming that serfs were actually free. Neither I claim that this epithet can be used ...


3

Two Problems There are really two issues you raise: 1) The contrast in the American voice (I limit myself to diplomatic and political, since the press was arguably equally anti-Japanese and anti-German) of condemnation of Japanese aggression, versus the lack of same against Germany 2) The apparent contrast in severity of provisions against Japan (in case ...


3

I don't know where you got the idea that the US was more "vocal against" Japan than the Axis powers. I picked a random week in 1938 (July 15-21) and looked at all the stories on page 1 of the New York Times. There were 8 negative stories on the Axis and 3 negative stories on Japan. And remember this was a time when Japan was actively attacking China, but ...


1

There were two main draft exemptions for men in the North. The first was that a man could hire or designate a substitute (e.g. a brother or cousin). The second was that a man could pay $300 (somewhere between $50,000 and $100,000 in today's money) to "opt out." In essence, one could buy one's way out of the draft. There was also a partial "exemption" for ...


2

The doors were kept open. On motion of Mr. M'KEAN, seconded by Mr. Smilie, — Ordered, That the doors of the Convention be left open during the session. The reasoning doesn't seem to be recorded in my source, http://www.constitution.org/rc/rat_pa.htm Evidently the session was a special case, as this is only recorded once, and references to the doors ...


2

Unfortunately, I had trouble finding a source of evidence to link to you for this, but I recall that, in a high school US History class, we watched a documentary on the death penalty, and it covered the history of it. There were some hand-painted signs advertising the killing of a known convict, but I can't recall what period they were from. That said, the ...


0

There was originally no unified term for such people. In Texas and California the Spanish-Mexican people were called "Mexicans". The census never recognized Mexicans separately until the 1930 census, in which they were "Mexicans". The term "hispanic" is an invention of liberal elitist academics during World War I. For example, to quote from the newly minted ...


0

One way to estimate an answer is to first count up all the "hard fighting" (i.e. famous) U.S. Army and Air Corps units. Just the Army Air Corps units in Europe and the Pacific include about 500,000 men who participated in air operations (with about 70,000 casualties). Now add in the U.S. Marines. That adds in another 200,000 who were in serious combat. ...



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